Women in Technology

A Dice Talent Community

Women in Technology Talent Community

A community for discussing issues related to women in technology. We’ll explore hiring and workplace issues, education and training, as well as organizations devoted to fostering women in science and technology.

Women in IT: The Landscape | Pioneers

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THIS DICE TALENT COMMUNITY SPONSORED BY:

Deloitte is where leaders thrive.

Deloitte is committed to hiring a diverse workforce that brings together people from all backgrounds, cultures and perspectives to help its clients and communities uncover solutions to complex issues. One way we demonstrate our intentions is through our Women’s Initiative, which we launched more than 20 years ago to retain, develop and advance our women professionals. We have also recently created a community for women pursuing careers in technology to help them learn more about Deloitte and connect with others who have similar interests.

In this collection of videos and slideshows, we offer the perspectives and experiences of women at different levels who work in our technology practice. You will also find information on Deloitte University – our learning and leader development facility – as well as the benefits we offer, our approach to work-life fit and support of our communities.

It is an exciting time to be a technology professional at Deloitte. Our practice is growing, fostering a culture of innovation that benefits our people, clients and communities.

The Latest From Dice

AMD’s New Female CEO Paid Less Than Her Predecessor

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Advanced Micro Devices is catching some flak over the salary for new Chief Executive Officer Lisa Su. The company plans on paying Su around $850,000, significantly less than what her predecessor, Rory Read, received during his tenure in the CEO chair. Read had earned roughly $1 million per year since 2011. According to Bloomberg, AMD issued a statement defending the gap: “Rory’s compensation included various incentives common in situations in which a person joins a new company. As a current… continue…

This CEO Thinks Women Make Better Executives Than Men

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In a wide-ranging interview with Business Insider, The Container Store CEO Kip Tindell revealed that women occupy 70 percent of his company’s senior ranks, a reversal of what one sees in most firms. “Obviously, we have nothing against men,” he told the interviewer. “It’s just that the skillset—communication, empathy, emotional intelligence, understanding what we stand for (Conscious Capitalism, servant leadership), and being like our target customer—really fits the bill with women.” Click here to find IT management jobs. The rest… continue…

Microsoft CEO Gaffe Highlights Gender Pay Issues

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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella spoke to an audience of female tech pros at the annual Grace Hopper Conference, and things didn’t quite go as planned. During an onstage question-and-answer session, Nadella suggested that female employees trust “karma” to get them the salary raise they deserve, rather than actually asking for one: “It’s not really about asking for the raise, but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along.” That ignited… continue…

Are Women Tracked to Certain IT Roles?

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Think of the stereotypical software architect or developer, and you might picture a guy in a hoodie, jittering from too many energy drinks. Like most clichés, it isn’t really true: Women have taken more roles in IT, from running startups to managing enterprise databases. Despite that progress, people still associate certain jobs in IT with men, suggests Kira Makagon, vice president of innovation at RingCentral, a San Mateo, Calif.-based provider of cloud business phone systems. Women made up only 19.7… continue…

Shortage of Women in Tech Kills Productivity

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In recent months, it’s become more apparent than ever that the culture inside many IT organizations isn’t welcoming to women. Whether the result of benign neglect or outright failure to call misogynistic behavior to account, the end result is that there are fewer women as a percentage of the IT workforce: a recent New York Times article reported that women hold only 25 percent of IT jobs, and that roughly half will eventually quit to pursue a completely different line… continue…