Women in Technology

A Dice Talent Community

Women in Technology Talent Community

A community for discussing issues related to women in technology. We’ll explore hiring and workplace issues, education and training, as well as organizations devoted to fostering women in science and technology.

Women in IT: The Landscape | Pioneers

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THIS DICE TALENT COMMUNITY SPONSORED BY:

Deloitte is where leaders thrive.

Deloitte is committed to hiring a diverse workforce that brings together people from all backgrounds, cultures and perspectives to help its clients and communities uncover solutions to complex issues. One way we demonstrate our intentions is through our Women’s Initiative, which we launched more than 20 years ago to retain, develop and advance our women professionals. We have also recently created a community for women pursuing careers in technology to help them learn more about Deloitte and connect with others who have similar interests.

In this collection of videos and slideshows, we offer the perspectives and experiences of women at different levels who work in our technology practice. You will also find information on Deloitte University – our learning and leader development facility – as well as the benefits we offer, our approach to work-life fit and support of our communities.

It is an exciting time to be a technology professional at Deloitte. Our practice is growing, fostering a culture of innovation that benefits our people, clients and communities.

The Latest From Dice

A Bechdel Test for Tech?

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In order for a movie or television show to pass the Bechdel Test (named after cartoonist and MacArthur genius Alison Bechdel), it must do three things: Feature two female characters Have those two characters talk to one another Have those characters talk to one another about something other than a man A lot of movies and shows don’t pass. How would programming culture fare if subjected to a similar test? One tech firm, 18F, decided to find out after seeing… continue…

SXSW Session Shows Diversity Issues in Tech

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Improving the male-to-female ratio in the technology industry emerged as a big theme at South by Southwest this year—especially after a panel in which a prominent female executive, United States CTO Megan Smith, found herself repeatedly interrupted by Google executive chairman (and former CEO) Eric Schmidt. The session, titled “How Innovation Happens,” also included Aspen Institute CEO and author Walter Isaacson, perhaps most famous for his controversial biography of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. The event was advertised as a “conversation”… continue…

Apple Pledging $50 Million Toward Diversity

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In 2014, Apple unveiled a diversity report that sent CEO Tim Cook into a very public display of angst. “I’m not satisfied with the numbers,” he said, after Apple’s own internal data revealed that the company was 80 percent male and 54 percent white. Now Apple will partner with a handful of nonprofits to increase diversity in the tech industry as a whole. Under the terms of the new agreements, the National Center for Women and Information Technology, the Thurgood… continue…

Microsoft CEO Pledges More Company Diversity

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Microsoft will look less white and male in coming years, according to CEO Satya Nadella. Speaking at the company’s annual shareholder meeting, Nadella emphasized the Microsoft’s commitment to a “more diverse workforce” and “creating opportunities at every level of the company for all of Microsoft’s employees,” according to Business Insider. Nadella finds himself under a particular microscope after his comments at this October’s Grace Hopper Conference, in which he suggested that female employees trust in “karma” to secure them raises… continue…

Is the Tech Industry More Welcoming to Women?

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As awareness of the challenges facing women in the tech industry continues to grow, measures intended to help mitigate the problem may be having some effect. One core problem stems from an education system that has systematically failed to promote inclusion of women. Fortunately, progress is being made with regard to the hiring of women to teach STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) classes at the nation’s universities. In an editorial opinion piece recently published in The New York Times,… continue…