Women in Technology

A Dice Talent Community

Women in Technology Dice Talent Community

A community for discussing issues related to women in technology. We’ll explore hiring and workplace issues, education and training, as well as organizations devoted to fostering women in science and technology.

Women in IT: The Landscape | Pioneers

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Deloitte is where leaders thrive.

Deloitte is committed to hiring a diverse workforce that brings together people from all backgrounds, cultures and perspectives to help its clients and communities uncover solutions to complex issues. One way we demonstrate our intentions is through our Women’s Initiative, which we launched more than 20 years ago to retain, develop and advance our women professionals. We have also recently created a community for women pursuing careers in technology to help them learn more about Deloitte and connect with others who have similar interests.

In this collection of videos and slideshows, we offer the perspectives and experiences of women at different levels who work in our technology practice. You will also find information on Deloitte University – our learning and leader development facility – as well as the benefits we offer, our approach to work-life fit and support of our communities.

It is an exciting time to be a technology professional at Deloitte. Our practice is growing, fostering a culture of innovation that benefits our people, clients and communities.

The Latest From Dice

Diversity’s Not So Hot in the Game Business, Either

EA SIMS Screen Shot
Young and hip as it may be, the world of game development is as white and male as the rest of tech, according to a report from the International Game Developers Association. The organization’s 2014 Developer Satisfaction Survey found that a full 79 percent of developers are white, followed by 8.2 percent Hispanic/Latino, 7.5 percent Asian and 2.5 percent black. The IDGA says this represents a slightly better diversity picture than was seen in 2005, when 83.3 percent of the… continue…

Surprise! Facebook’s Workforce is White and Male, Too

Facebook Tech Team Diversity
Facebook has released figures showing the diversity of its workforce and, as with Google and Yahoo before it, the numbers depict a company that’s overwhelmingly male and white. Men constitute 69 percent of the company’s overall employee base, and 85 percent of the technical team. Fifty seven percent of the overall workforce is white, while 34 percent is Asian, 4 percent is Hispanic and 2 percent is black. Looking at technical employees, 53 percent are white, 41 percent are Asian,… continue…

Interview: Blackhawk Network CIO Christine Vonderach

Christine Vonderach
Christine Vonderach is CIO of Pleasanton, Calif.-based Blackhawk Network, which uses proprietary technology to offer a broad range of gift cards, other prepaid products, and payment services in more than 20 countries. Vonderach is one of a rare breed: According to a 2013 survey by recruiter Harvey Nash found that just 8 percent of American CIOs are women. Her approach was simple to express: Focus on being an overachiever. Before joining Blackhawk in 2010, she held leadership positions at Ask.com/IAC,… continue…

Yahoo’s Diversity Report Shows Lack of Women in Tech, Leader Roles

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Women are a significant minority at Yahoo, according to its newly released diversity report. Women make up 37 percent of Yahoo’s global workforce, while men compose 62 percent (roughly 1 percent of employees either said “Other” or didn’t disclose their gender). Women only occupy 15 percent of Yahoo’s technical jobs, and 23 percent of its leadership positions; they’re better represented in non-tech roles, where they make up 57 percent of headcount. Yahoo declined to break out its gender percentages by… continue…

CMU Sees Dramatic Rise in Women Computer Science Majors

Woman at Computer
Women comprise 40 percent of the incoming class at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science. That marks, in the school’s words, “a new benchmark.” It’s certainly a respectable number when compared to the proportion of women who earned bachelor’s degrees in computer science during the 2012-2013 school year: 14 percent, according to the Computer Research Association. It’s also nearly double the 22 percent that entered the school during that same period. Click here to search research jobs. The last… continue…