Training

Hack Reactor Tries MOOC Approach to Boot Camps

Posted In Looking in Tech
TRAINING---Big-Stock
San Francisco-based boot camp Hack Reactor is launching a remote program that it describes as “the world’s first work-from-home immersive coding school,” reports VentureBeat. Hack Reactor Remote will teach software and Web development, with an emphasis on JavaScript. While online programs usually take a somewhat flexible approach to learning, Hack Reactor Remote puts students into a three-month immersion program in real time, with a live instructor. It mirrors the company’s in-person classes, offering the same coursework and approach of pairing… continue…

‘NanoDegrees’ Offer Entry-Level, Job-Specific Credentials

Working Online
AT&T and the online education company Udacity have unveiled a “NanoDegree” program designed to teach the basic programming skills necessary to qualify for entry-level technology jobs. The program costs $200 a month and can be completed by a working student in six months to a year, without their having to take time off. Starting this fall, courses will be offered in front- and back-end Web development, iOS development and data analysis. More subjects—including Android development—are on the horizon. AT&T says… continue…

How to Compare Boot Camps and Online Training

Posted In Looking in Tech
Decision Blackboard
Coding boot camps position themselves as an effective way to learn new technology. But are they the most effective way to do this? Aaron Skonnard doesn’t think so, though he’s not without bias. He runs Pluralsight, an online training destination that offers courses for developers and other tech professionals. Writing in Venturebeat, he contends that boot camps can be valuable, but are limited in their approach. He thinks online learning is a better alternative because: Boot camps require students to… continue…

How Long Does It Take to Learn a New Skill?

Posted In Looking in Tech
BlackJack Program
When employers say they need specific skills, job seekers often reply that an experienced IT professional can learn a new language or technology quickly. But is that really the case? It may be if the skill in question is closely related to your experience, but if you’re looking to pick up a new language from scratch the challenge is much greater. There aren’t many programming languages general purpose enough so that when you learn one you may never need to… continue…

2 Little-Known Certifications That Could Get You Promoted

Posted In Looking in Tech
OpenGroup Certified Thumbnail
When it comes to earning certifications, tech professionals always worry about whether it’s worth their time and money. For enterprise architects and IT specialists, there’s some good news: Two credentials earned through the Open Group — including its Open Certified Architect and Open Certified IT Specialist — pay off, though not as you might think. Their value seems to be higher when it comes to moving up within your existing employer, as opposed to getting the attention of new hiring… continue…

How to Spot Your Next Big Skill

Posted In Looking in Tech
Programming Languages
Keeping your career on track is challenging enough without having to worry about timing: If you learn an emerging technology too soon, the jobs won’t be there. If you wait too long, you’ll face stiff competition. So how can you develop impeccable timing? By actively monitoring the evolution of promising technologies that align with your skills and interests. When new tech starts to gain momentum and more and more people get their hands into it, it’s time to make your… continue…

Can Hacker Schools Provide the Training You Need?

Posted In Looking in Tech
Programming Training Iron Yard
An alternative is rising for people who want to develop new technical skills: Hacker schools, which are billed as quick, cheap alternatives to traditional educational approaches. The schools are cropping up across the country, especially in tech-heavy areas like San Francisco, New York and Boston. They’re not cheap, though. A program at the Iron Yard, based in South Carolina, takes three months and costs $9,000. A two-month program at Atlanta’s Tech Talent South runs $6,250 for full-time students and $4,250… continue…

What the Next 18 Months Hold for Software Careers

Tech Forecast
It’s easy to put your head down and focus on the work that you have to do today. To think about the job you’re doing now. To think about the technology you know already. To understand the team structure you’re currently in. That’s what’s now. But what’s next? Let’s take a walk through the next 18 months and see where engineering is going. Focus on Learning What’s Going On: Hiring managers have figured out that tomorrow’s skills won’t be today’s… continue…

How to Tell If an Employer Takes Training Seriously

Posted In Looking in Tech
Training
Software engineers, architects, programmers and project managers are often left to their own devices when it comes to training. If they’re interested in learning new programming languages or updating certifications, the work often gets done on their own time. But according to Edmond Freiermuth, a Los Angeles-based management consultant, there’s a link between training and corporate culture. Companies that want to train their people, he contends, generally pursue a longer-term commitment to their workers, one that translates to the employee’s… continue…

Authentication’s New Methods Spotlight Need for More Training

Fingerprint Authentication
IT security professionals may want to brace for more training and skills development on emerging forms of authentication following Google’s acquisition of Israeli startup SlickLogin and moves by organizations like the Fast Identity Online Alliance (FIDO). Companies are seeking ways to keep their customers and employees secure online beyond reusable passwords, as cybercriminals become increasingly sophisticated and attacks more massive in scope, as evidenced by the recent Target security breach. Earlier this week, Google acquired SlickLogin, which uses a unique,… continue…