Security

How I Made the Leap to IT Security

Posted In Data
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Fifteen years ago, the landscape of IT was so fluid you could almost pick your specialty and start working. The need for computer engineers was so great, that anyone with some ambition could go far reasonably fast. Document services specialists—who type for a living—were moving into application deployment. A night security guard who spent his time studying Novell became a certified Novell administrator. I worked in a copy center in a small law firm and became their network administrator literally… continue…

SourceForge Q&A: Open-Source Antivirus Engine

Posted In Programming
ClamAV
SourceForge’s February “Community Choice” Project of the Month is ClamAntiVirus, a GPL antivirus toolkit for UNIX that integrates with mail servers. The ClamAV team sat down with SourceForge’s editors to share their thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction. Check out the latest open source development jobs. Tell me about the ClamAV project, please. ClamAV is an open source (GPL) anti-virus engine used in a variety of situations including email scanning, Web scanning, and end point security. It provides… continue…

White House Issues Report on Big Data, Privacy

Posted In Data
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In early 2014, following months of revelations about the degree of NSA spying on Americans’ electronic communications, President Obama ordered a government review of how “Big Data” will affect how people live and work. Check out the latest Big Data jobs. Roughly a year later, a report has arrived (PDF), with recommendations for preserving Americans’ online privacy protections. According to the report’s authors, “technology alone cannot protect privacy absent strong social norms and a responsive policy and legal framework.” The… continue…

Google Paying Out Grants to Bug-Hunters

Posted In Data
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For security researchers who specialize in hunting down bugs, Google just made the profession a tad more lucrative. Over the past five years, Google has paid out more than $4 million to roughly 200 security researchers who have discovered bugs in its software. (In total, those researchers have discovered more than 500 bugs.) For some bug-hunters, that work has opened the door to a full-fledged career: George Hotz, a 25-year-old hacker, earned the largest award ($150,000) in 2014 for discovering… continue…

The Most Popular Bad Passwords of 2014

Posted In Living in Tech
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Despite near-constant news of high-profile hacks, and the omnipresent threat of identify theft, millions of people around the world persist in using terrible passwords. SplashData just released its annual list of the 25 most common passwords (a list it compiled from 3.3 million leaked passwords over the course of 2014), and the results are depressing, to say the least: 1. 123456 2. password 3. 12345 4. 12345678 5. qwerty 6. 1234567890 7. 1234 (Up 9) 8. baseball 9. dragon 10.… continue…

Tech Jobs That Will Win (and Lose) in 2015

Posted In Looking in Tech
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If you’d like to change jobs or switch from freelance to full-time status, prepare to pounce: 2015 is shaping up to be a blockbuster year for the IT labor market, according to David Foote, CEO of research firm Foote Partners LLC. “This year started out slow, just as we predicted,” Foote said. “But U.S. employers added an average of 17,633 IT jobs during September, October and November, and we see that momentum continuing into 2015.” Foote’s optimistic forecast is based… continue…

Sorry, Your Online Privacy Is Doomed: Report

Posted In Living in Tech
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What’s the future of privacy? The Pew Research Center (a nonpartisan think tank) recently asked 2,511 privacy experts and “Internet builders” to offer their predictions on how security and privacy online will evolve over the next several years. To those experts, Pew posed three questions: Security, liberty, privacy online—Will policy makers and technology innovators create a secure, popularly accepted, and trusted privacy-rights infrastructure by 2025 that allows for business innovation and monetization while also offering individuals choices for protecting their… continue…

Google Building Kid-Friendly YouTube, Chrome

Posted In Living in Tech
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Google wants to make a selection of its products more kid-friendly. In an interview with USA Today, Google Vice President of Engineering Pavni Diwanji suggested that versions of Google search, Chrome, and YouTube designed for the 12-and-younger set could appear within the next year. “We want to be thoughtful about what we do, giving parents the right tools to oversee their kids’ use of our products,” she told the newspaper. “We want kids to be safe, but ultimately it’s about… continue…

Google Wants to Nuke CAPTCHA for Good

Posted In Living in Tech
Google recaptcha API
We’ve all filled out those CAPTCHA tests that websites place at the end of online forms to determine whether we’re human or a bot. Pretty much everyone can agree those tests are annoying—who wants to spend even a few seconds peering at a mush of distorted letters, trying to figure out whether a particularly troublesome one is an “a” or an “o”? Click here to find bot-related jobs. Google’s reCAPTCHA project wants to save the Web from CAPTCHA. The underlying… continue…

Daily Tip: Never Use These Passwords

Posted In Living in Tech
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Sony suffered a massive hack late last month, which resulted in a hacker collective not only dumping five of the company’s unreleased films online, but also leaking internal documents. Those documents contained salary data and other employee information. According to Mashable, the hacked files included a folder marked “Passwords,” containing employee usernames and passwords in plain text. Some of the passwords in that folder are truly awful: “Password,” “s0ny123,” and so on. (It’s unclear whether the hackers used that information… continue…