Security

The Most Popular Bad Passwords of 2014

Posted In Living in Tech
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Despite near-constant news of high-profile hacks, and the omnipresent threat of identify theft, millions of people around the world persist in using terrible passwords. SplashData just released its annual list of the 25 most common passwords (a list it compiled from 3.3 million leaked passwords over the course of 2014), and the results are depressing, to say the least: 1. 123456 2. password 3. 12345 4. 12345678 5. qwerty 6. 1234567890 7. 1234 (Up 9) 8. baseball 9. dragon 10.… continue…

Tech Jobs That Will Win (and Lose) in 2015

Posted In Looking in Tech
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If you’d like to change jobs or switch from freelance to full-time status, prepare to pounce: 2015 is shaping up to be a blockbuster year for the IT labor market, according to David Foote, CEO of research firm Foote Partners LLC. “This year started out slow, just as we predicted,” Foote said. “But U.S. employers added an average of 17,633 IT jobs during September, October and November, and we see that momentum continuing into 2015.” Foote’s optimistic forecast is based… continue…

Sorry, Your Online Privacy Is Doomed: Report

Posted In Living in Tech
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What’s the future of privacy? The Pew Research Center (a nonpartisan think tank) recently asked 2,511 privacy experts and “Internet builders” to offer their predictions on how security and privacy online will evolve over the next several years. To those experts, Pew posed three questions: Security, liberty, privacy online—Will policy makers and technology innovators create a secure, popularly accepted, and trusted privacy-rights infrastructure by 2025 that allows for business innovation and monetization while also offering individuals choices for protecting their… continue…

Google Building Kid-Friendly YouTube, Chrome

Posted In Living in Tech
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Google wants to make a selection of its products more kid-friendly. In an interview with USA Today, Google Vice President of Engineering Pavni Diwanji suggested that versions of Google search, Chrome, and YouTube designed for the 12-and-younger set could appear within the next year. “We want to be thoughtful about what we do, giving parents the right tools to oversee their kids’ use of our products,” she told the newspaper. “We want kids to be safe, but ultimately it’s about… continue…

Google Wants to Nuke CAPTCHA for Good

Posted In Living in Tech
Google recaptcha API
We’ve all filled out those CAPTCHA tests that websites place at the end of online forms to determine whether we’re human or a bot. Pretty much everyone can agree those tests are annoying—who wants to spend even a few seconds peering at a mush of distorted letters, trying to figure out whether a particularly troublesome one is an “a” or an “o”? Click here to find bot-related jobs. Google’s reCAPTCHA project wants to save the Web from CAPTCHA. The underlying… continue…

Daily Tip: Never Use These Passwords

Posted In Living in Tech
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Sony suffered a massive hack late last month, which resulted in a hacker collective not only dumping five of the company’s unreleased films online, but also leaking internal documents. Those documents contained salary data and other employee information. According to Mashable, the hacked files included a folder marked “Passwords,” containing employee usernames and passwords in plain text. Some of the passwords in that folder are truly awful: “Password,” “s0ny123,” and so on. (It’s unclear whether the hackers used that information… continue…

Developers: Stop Using Buggy Code

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As researchers uncover one serious flaw after another in widely used software, it’s increasingly clear there are lots of vulnerabilities, everywhere. While there are efforts underway to identify and fix these issues before criminals exploit them, the bigger challenge is stopping developers from using buggy code. There is no such thing as perfect software, but developers can reduce the number of bugs by following secure coding practices. There are also tools which can analyze individual libraries—both open-source and commercial—included in… continue…

Certifications With the Highest Demand

Posted In Looking in Tech
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For years, cynical IT pros have maintained that certifications aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on. But recruiters and analysts report a growing interest in IT certification. While it’s true that employers still want to see experience, certification can provide outside validation of your skills… and signal a commitment to furthering those skills. Certifications in these areas are showing some of the sharpest growth in demand: Security The recent breaches at Target, Home Depot and the almost-daily privacy and security… continue…

Best Tips for Secure Data Retention

Posted In Working in Tech
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Corporate retailers including Home Depot, Target, Michaels, Dairy Queen, and Kmart have all been victims of security breaches, and are still feeling the aftereffects. In addition to the financial repercussions, even mainstream brands suffer from diminished trust when customer data is compromised. This trust can be difficult to rebuild, and the negative effects are often even more pronounced for small- or medium-sized businesses. To find IT security jobs, click here. Privacy Policies Being upfront with users about how long you… continue…

Americans Fear for Their Privacy Online: Report

Posted In Living in Tech
Pew Word Bubble
Americans fear for their privacy online, according to a new survey of 607 Americans by the Pew Research Center. Given the amount of publicity surrounding last year’s revelations about the extent of the National Security Agency’s spying, it’s no wonder that 87 percent of Americans have heard anywhere from “a little” to “a lot” about the government’s mass collection of electronic communications and telephone calls. (A mere 5 percent had heard “nothing at all.”) For more privacy-related jobs, click here.… continue…