Salaries

IT Jobs With the Best (and Worst) ROI

shutterstock_Kostenko Maxim
Many IT jobs come with rigorous academic requirements, but not all of those jobs offer high starting salaries and explosive growth potential. Which ones offer the best (and worst) return on investment (ROI)? IT Jobs With the Best ROI DBA Entry-level salary: $59,000 Average salary: $102,446 Although 60 percent of DBAs have a bachelor’s degree, 16 percent have an associate’s degree and 20 percent have some college, according to data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau. Demand exceeds supply, with… continue…

The Highest-Paid Big Data Skills

Posted In Data, Looking in Tech
shutterstock_Maksim Kabakou
Yes, “Big Data” has become one of those buzzwords, along with “cloud,” that’s way overused these days. But it’s clear that employers want tech pros who can analyze massive datasets and deliver actionable intelligence: According to the most recent Dice Report, firms in several states consider data-analytics skills a critical resource, one that they’re more than happy to shell out big bucks to obtain. Dice found that a full 24 percent of survey respondents in Seattle had Big Data skills—an… continue…

How to Avoid Messing Up Your Salary Negotiation

shutterstock_Maryna Pleshkun
So you applied for a job, landed the interview (which you aced), and now the employer’s offering you the position. Here comes the next tricky part: negotiating over salary. Whether getting a new job or looking to take the next step up after working at the same company for several years, a successful salary negotiation demands some research and prep work on your part. It’s also all about avoiding critical mistakes. With that in mind, here are some pointers: Do… continue…

For Developers, Startups Could Equal Big Salaries

shutterstock_Gonzalo Aragon
Conventional wisdom suggests that, if you want to make truly big money as a developer or programmer, you should head to the biggest possible firm. On the surface, such advice makes sense: Who has deeper pockets than Google or Apple, after all? While those big firms might provide job security and some very nice perks (who has a better cafeteria than Google?), they’re not the only ones with money: Startups are shelling out quite a bit for tech talent, recognizing… continue…

Dealing With Salary Requests Before the Job Offer

Shutterstock Africa Studio
You’ve probably dealt with it before: You sit down for a job interview, and the interviewer asks how much you expect to be paid. At those moments, you should resist the urge to say, “A million-billion dollars.” All joking aside, a potential employer asking you for a salary number ahead of a job offer can create significant problems. If you state a figure that’s too high, you may sink your chances of landing the job; if you lowball yourself, you… continue…

Linux Pros Prepared to Jump in 2015

shutterstock_Family Business
With more and more companies relying on Linux—some 11,800 developers from 1,200 companies have contributed to the kernel over the last decade, according to the Linux Foundation—it stands to reason that Linux pros would find themselves in ever-increasing demand, especially those who specialize in anything cloud- or security-related. And Linux pros are sensing that opportunity; in a recent Linux Foundation survey, some 55 percent of them said it would be “very easy” or “fairly easy” to find a new job… continue…

H-1B Visas Proving Lucrative for Engineers, Leads

Posted In Data, Looking in Tech
Swizec
Ever wanted to know how much H-1B holders make per year? Developer Swizec Teller, who is about to apply for an H-1B visa, took data from the U.S. Department of Labor and visualized it in a series of graphs that break down H-1B salaries on a state-by-state basis. Teller found that the average engineer with an H-1B makes $87,000 a year, a good deal higher than developers ($74,000) and programmers ($61,000) with the same visa. “Don’t call yourself a programmer,”… continue…

Will Your Next Employer Advance Your Career?

shutterstock_Sergey Nivens
A lack of career progression is the No. 1 reason why people quit their jobs, according to a list of deal-breakers compiled last year by BambooHR. Poor work-life balance came in second, with pay dissatisfaction the third-leading cause of worker defections. If these complaints sound familiar, you may already be seeking greener pastures. But how can you tell if your advancement and earning potential will be any better at another company? Here are four ways to investigate your chances of… continue…

Why 2015 Could Prove Great for Tech Pros

shutterstock_Valeri Potapova
The U.S. tech industry added 129,600 net jobs between 2013 and 2014, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data analyzed by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA), which counts 2,000 companies as members. The industry accounts for 6.5 million jobs overall, CompTIA’s report added. IT services racked up nearly a third of that total, with 2.1 million jobs in 2014, followed by R&D, testing, and engineering services (1.6 million jobs), telecommunications and Internet services (1.2 million jobs), tech manufacturing… continue…

Why You Should Run Your Career Like a Startup

shutterstock_Jirsak
Times are good in today’s technology job market. The IT unemployment rate is hovering below 3 percent and employers are scrambling to find developers and engineers. But that doesn’t mean a successful career is a foregone conclusion. Even in heady times, corporate needs evolve, the skills in demand change and some industries lose favor among consumers while new ones gain prominence. Business moves fast, and employer loyalty has all but vanished. “In today’s job market, nobody’s going to take care… continue…