Programming

Here’s Apple to Teach You About Swift

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As a company, Apple has a well-earned reputation for CIA-caliber secrecy. New products are developed under tight security, employees always refuse to comment on new projects and good luck trying to get a quote out of an executive if you’re a member of the press. With that in mind, the company’s latest move is a bit of a shocker: the debut of an official blog devoted to Swift, meant to provide “a behind-the-scenes look into the design of the Swift… continue…

New Programming Language Uses Schwarzenegger’s One-Liners

Posted In Living in Tech
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There are lots of programming languages out there. But how many of them let you code using Arnold Schwarzenegger’s iconic one-liners? The answer is one: ArnoldC, available on GitHub. If you ever wanted to type “I NEED YOUR CLOTHES YOUR BOOTS AND YOUR MOTORCYCLE” in place of “MethodArguments” or “YOU HAVE BEEN TERMINATED” instead of “EndMain,” this is the imperative programming language for you. (And yes, those all-caps are a necessity.) The language currently features 33 keywords, each coded to… continue…

Secret Service Wants Sarcasm Detection. That’ll Work Out.

Posted In Looking in Tech
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The Secret Service is in the market for software capable of detecting sarcastic language online, according to the Washington Post. In a note posted on FBO.gov, the agency indicated that it wants a software tool that can perform real-time stream analysis, sentiment and trend analysis, audience and geographic segmentation, access to historical Twitter data and “ability to detect sarcasm and false positives,” among other attributes. Click here to see jobs involving sentiment analysis. “Our objective is to automate our social-media… continue…

50 Reasons to Celebrate BASIC

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I started programming in BASIC 38 years ago, in 1976 while I was in my last year of school. I enjoyed it so much that it decided my university degree and career. Back in the mid 70s, if you had access to a computer, it was most likely through a dial-up terminal and you programmed it in Dartmouth BASIC. May 1, 1964, was the date BASIC was launched onto an unsuspecting world at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. That makes… continue…

May’s Programming Challenge: Resource Trading

Posted In Living in Tech
Roman Trade Network
In this problem, you are given a 20×20 map that contains 20 trading islands, each occupying a square. Each island is a trading port for gold, iron and wood. The map also contains a few reefs and uninhabited islands. The goal is simply to sail a ship from the top left square (0,0) and eventually end up at the bottom right (19,19) having earned as much as possible. Click here to find Java developer jobs. Your ship can sail to… continue…

Interview Questions for Python/Django Developers

Posted In Looking in Tech
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Django, an open source framework written in Python, was designed to save Web developers time and money by promoting the idea of reusing code and avoiding replication. As with any language, programmers interviewing for a job involving Django are going to face a series of specialized questions. We asked Remco Wendt, a Berlin-based entrepreneur and member of the Django Software Foundation, how he screens candidates. Though he uses a live coding test and a short take-home project to plumb the… continue…

A NoSQL Alternative: Disk Folders

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One of the joys of programming is that there are often many different ways to accomplish the same goal. That comes in handy when you’re not feeling too confident about a given solution. Consider this problem I recently faced. I was choosing between a relational database or NoSQL for a game server I was working on. Whichever I chose would contain a couple dozen tables and would need to support up to 100,000 users. My real-time needs were very modest,… continue…

As Data Needs Increase, R Shows Slow, Steady Growth

Posted In Looking in Tech
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By Orla O’Sullivan Although R is riding the waves of Big Data and open source, plus benefiting from a swell of startups who use it as an inexpensive yet effective tool, opportunities that rely on skills with the statistical analysis language remain modest. That’s an odd dynamic, given that the program is widely taught and free in a space where competitors can cost thousands of dollars a year to license. Developed by statisticians rather than programmers, R is known as… continue…

Can Hacker Schools Provide the Training You Need?

Posted In Looking in Tech
Programming Training Iron Yard
An alternative is rising for people who want to develop new technical skills: Hacker schools, which are billed as quick, cheap alternatives to traditional educational approaches. The schools are cropping up across the country, especially in tech-heavy areas like San Francisco, New York and Boston. They’re not cheap, though. A program at the Iron Yard, based in South Carolina, takes three months and costs $9,000. A two-month program at Atlanta’s Tech Talent South runs $6,250 for full-time students and $4,250… continue…

These 2 Things Drive Coders Crazy

Posted In Living in Tech
Frustrated Businessman
It’s become something of an article of faith that the best developers love programming so much that it’s all they want to do. But Business Insider’s Julie Bort is wondering if that’s the real case. It’s a good time to be a coder — employers can’t find as many as they need and pay is healthy — but Bort says their life is made difficult by two things: a nagging sense that they’re not as good as they should be,… continue…