Legal

Can Cyber Martial Law Happen Here?

Posted In Looking in Tech
Riot Police
Certainly governments have a role in fighting online crime. Indeed, here in the United States federal authorities are becoming more and more aggressive in using the Internet to monitor citizens and non-citizens alike when they fall under suspicion, though there’s plenty of debate around when exactly such cyber tools are used to prove criminal activity or monitor people. What online security measures governments should take is an especially dicey question in countries with a history of oppression or don’t embrace… continue…

Apple, Samsung and the Future of Android

2012
Android design patterns aren’t immediately affected by a jury’s ruling for Apple in its patent-infringement case against Samsung, but the future of the platform’s design may be. Google hasn’t released an official statement regarding the ruling and future of the Android UI, but there’s plenty of speculation about the overall future of mobile computing. And some attorneys, CNET says, believe the basis for the verdict is tenuous and the decision is likely to be overturned on appeal. For now, there… continue…

FBI Thought Kim Dotcom Was Capable of ‘Mass Data Destruction’

Posted In Living in Tech
The FBI convinced the New Zealand government to raid the mansion of Kim Dotcom with its elite counterterrorism unit by claiming that he was in possession of a “doomsday device.” The FBI believed that the Megaupload founder had developed a way to immediately eliminate all evidence of computer-related crimes from his systems with the flick of a switch. Unfortunately for the FBI — or fortunately, depending on how you look at it — he didn’t. That’s  evidenced by the fact… continue…

Judge Says Oracle and Google Must Identify Their Paid Bloggers

If you’re a blogger or journalist who received payments from Oracle or Google to write about their copyright infringement case, prepare yourselves. The judge in Oracle’s lawsuit against Google wants to know who’s been paid by either of the companies to cover the case.  U.S. District Judge William Alsup ordered the companies to hand over the names of anyone “who have and/or may publish comments on the issues in this case,” including print or Internet authors, journalists, commentators or bloggers.… continue…

Google To Pay $22.5 Million For Safari Privacy Breach

Google is close to a deal with the  Federal Trade Commission to settle allegations it bypassed Safari’s privacy settings. Although Google and the FTC staff have reportedly reached a $22.5 million dollar settlement, the largest for the federal agency, the FTC commissioners still need to sign off. The FTC investigation started in March and everybody expected it to last for years. However, things have moved much more quickly than planned. Mia Culpa Google allegedly bypassed Safari’s privacy settings by exploiting… continue…

To Stop Distracted Driving, Cape Town Police Confiscate Phones

Posted In Living in Tech
We get it, driving and phoning at the same time is dangerous, yet people continue to do it, regardless of the consequences – financial or otherwise. Now police in Cape Town, South Africa, are trying a new approach: They have started confiscating phones for 24 hours. The situation is a little worse for drivers who lose their phones on a Friday, since traffic offices are closed over the weekend. At the time of confiscation, the driver is given an opportunity… continue…

Developers Win With Oracle-Google Verdict

Scales of Justice
Developers received the news that they were hoping to hear at the end of the closely watched Oracle-Google trial. The verdict: Google’s use of 37 Java APIs did not violate copyright laws and, as a result, developers aren’t liable for paying hefty licensing fees or maintaining a sizable legal retainer to fight off any litigation that could have arisen. Judge William Alsup noted the code in question is considered a utility function of Java and required for interoperability. In his ruling, Alsup… continue…

Internet Defense League Pounces On ACTA, CISPA

Internet Defense League
A huge buzz circulated on the Internet this year over bills like SOPA/PIPA, ACTA and CISPA. The online community was clearly on the verge of receiving blows that could have killed it. Fortunately, as the world’s attention  focused on Facebook’s IPO and other breaking news, a non-profit group called Fight for the Future had an idea to create the Internet Defense League. Any website, blog or even YouTube channel can join to fight against anti-piracy laws. A list of big websites have already joined: Reddit, Mozilla,… continue…

‘Entrepreneur Visa’ Would Allow Longer Stays for Entrepreneurs

IF
Foreign students with post-graduate degrees in math, science, or engineering from American colleges may find it easier to stay in the U.S. should proposed legislation pass into law. The legislation, created by a bipartisan group of senators, would create an entrepreneur’s visa to allow foreigners who start new businesses and create jobs to remain in the country. The proposal calls for a total of 75,000 visas for immigrant entrepreneurs in science and technology. The bill also includes a proposal for a targeted… continue…

Microsoft Protects Copyrights With Google Transparency

Google Transparency
Google’s Transparency Report is a great tool for analyzing how many URL removal requests the search giant is processing. The weekly number of URLs removed  reached about 285,000 the week of May 14. That’s double the 130,000 removals it processed during the week of July 18 a year ago. Microsoft is one of the largest users of Google’s Transparency Report, monitoring it to remove URLs that it believes contain infringed copyrights. Other companies that also rely heavily on it include… continue…