Hackers

Rising Cyberattacks Mean Opportunity for Security Pros

Posted In Data, Living in Tech
Symantec
The Web can be a dangerous place: According to the latest annual “Internet Security Threat Report” from Symantec (PDF; registration required), sophisticated attacks such as highly targeted spear-phishing are on the rise, and often aimed at small- to medium-sized businesses that may not be able to afford the advanced IT security of enterprises. (Of course, the past few years have demonstrated that not even enterprises are immune from devastating cyberattacks.) Symantec has seen advanced attackers do everything from building custom… continue…

10 Reasons Why You Need a Cybersecurity Plan

Posted In Data
shutterstock_Sergey Nivens
Over the past year, we’ve witnessed all the hype surrounding cybersecurity finally transform into a frightening new reality, one where corporate and government organizations seem helpless to stop cyberincursions. No need to list statistics or polls anymore to try to quantify the threat: Cyberattacks have become nonstop headline news. The transformation from perceived threat to actual headlines has occurred for the following reasons: Hacking, cracking and other forms of cybermischief have reached a level of sophistication equaling (and in many… continue…

Auto-Deleting Emails: The Next Hot Feature?

Posted In Data
shutterstock_Trybex
The ability to archive and search through email is a valuable business tool: Who hasn’t cycled back through a year’s worth of messages to find an important piece of data? But email, despite all its obvious value, also has a downside: If unauthorized users gain access to the server holding all those messages, they can quickly learn your secrets. Just look at what happened to Sony after a few determined hackers penetrated its IT security: Not only did a trove… continue…

Penetration Testing Is a White-Hot Industry

Posted In Looking in Tech
Maksim Kabakou Shutterstock
In the wake of high-profile IT breaches at Target and other major corporations, penetration-testing firms are more popular than ever. Companies and government agencies have woken up to the fact that a cyberattack on their data is all but inevitable, and they need employees and contractors capable of discovering vulnerabilities before hackers do. In other words, it’s a potentially lucrative time to explore penetration testing as a career. You could work for the security offshoot of a well-established firm such… continue…

Hack of Russian Defense Firm Called ‘Cyberwar’

Posted In DataCenter
New anti-Putin hacktivist group cracks Russian arms-export firm, posts (infected) 500MB of documents and passports. continue…

Snapchat Finally Says ‘Sorry’

Posted In Cloud
More than a week after attackers swiped information on 4.6 million users, Snapchat offers that long-awaited apology. continue…

Shocker: The Internet of Things Is Insecure

Picture hundreds of millions—maybe billions, at some future point—of connected devices vulnerable to all sorts of hacks. continue…

How Hackers Use Bots to Score Prime Restaurant Reservations

Posted In Cloud
Automated scripts aren’t just for e-commerce or high-frequency trading: you can also use them to nail a good table for four at a hot eatery. continue…

System Admins and Hackers: Now What?

Posted In Living in Tech
Systems Admin Thumbnail
The last couple of weeks have brought tons of coverage on the government’s metadata gathering, the privacy concerns of American citizens and who has access to data in large, sprawling systems. As the NSA, Booz-Allen and the IT sector grapples with what to do next, it shouldn’t come as any surprise that system admins and their role would all of the sudden come under scrutiny. The situation illustrates the extremely complex interplay between computing professionals and their organizations, especially when… continue…

Ways AP Could Have Avoided Its Twitter Hack

AP Hack T
A single tweet with a phony bit of news sent the stock market into a brief dive Tuesday, pushing the Dow Jones Industrial Average down more than 140 points in the three minutes from 1:07 to 1:10 p.m. ET. When the “news” — that two bombs had exploded in the White House, injuring the president — was debunked, the market regained its footing.   Of course, phony information blasts out through Twitter all the time. The difference here is that… continue…