Education

‘Boot Camps’ Soften Pitch, Bulk Up Courses

Posted In Looking in Tech
Programming Training Iron Yard
Some short-term coding schools are trying to manage the expectations of their students by tempering claims about their graduates’ job prospects, The Wall Street Journal reports. Such programs, which often focus on hot skills like Python and Ruby on Rails, have been proliferating of late. They can cost anywhere from $6,000 to nearly $18,000 for a three-month course. The real question surrounding the schools is whether they produce career-ready professionals in less time than it takes to complete one college… continue…

Computer Science Enrollments Continue to Grow

Posted In Looking in Tech
Graduates
The number of new undergraduate computing majors continued to grow last year, rising 13.4 percent, according to a report from the Computing Research Association. Although that’s smaller growth than has been seen in years, it does represent the sixth straight period of growth. Enrollments bottomed out in 2007, just before the recession. New computer science enrollments grew by nearly 30 percent in 2011-12 and 23 percent the year before. Last year, 63,873 students enrolled in computer science programs, compared with… continue…

Report: Little Growth in STEM Talent Pipeline

Posted In Looking in Tech
U.S. News and Raytheon STEM Index
The pipeline of STEM talent in the U.S. continues to lag even as the need for tech professionals continues to soar, according to an index put together by Raytheon and U.S. News. The U.S. News/Raytheon STEM Index looks at 93 factors, including ACT math and science scores, Advance Placement test scores, college and graduate degrees granted and U.S. employment in STEM fields. Says the report: …after a long period of flat to down indicators, there has been some upward movement,… continue…

A Tech Career May Not Require a Four-Year Degree

Posted In Looking in Tech
Math Lecture
Do you need a bachelor’s degree to have a successful career in IT? Not necessarily. In some occupations, professionals with less-costly two-year degrees may actually out-earn people with more education, according to research from Georgetown University. In fact, Georgetown says that 28 percent of people with an associate’s degree make more than the median of workers with a bachelor’s degree. For instance, you can make a nice living as a Web developer, application developer, computer programmer, computer support specialist, game… continue…

No Bachelor’s Degree? No Problem, in NYC’s Tech Scene

Posted In Looking in Tech
NYC Tech Jobs Graph
When it comes to working in New York City’s tech scene, the lack of a bachelor’s degree isn’t an impediment: a recent report (PDF) by the Association for a Better New York (ABNY), NY Tech Meetup (NYTM), Citi, and Google found that 44 percent of jobs in the city’s “tech ecosystem” don’t require a four-year diploma. New York City has spent several years encouraging the growth of “Silicon Alley.” In addition to major tech companies such as Google and Facebook… continue…

Can Hacker Schools Provide the Training You Need?

Posted In Looking in Tech
Programming Training Iron Yard
An alternative is rising for people who want to develop new technical skills: Hacker schools, which are billed as quick, cheap alternatives to traditional educational approaches. The schools are cropping up across the country, especially in tech-heavy areas like San Francisco, New York and Boston. They’re not cheap, though. A program at the Iron Yard, based in South Carolina, takes three months and costs $9,000. A two-month program at Atlanta’s Tech Talent South runs $6,250 for full-time students and $4,250… continue…

Demand for IT Engineers Shows in Salaries

Posted In Looking in Tech
Techonomics Logo Thumbnail
IT engineers continue to be in demand, and the proof is in their salaries, according to the 2013–2014 PayScale College Salary report. Their roles accounted for a sizable chunk of the top 10 salaries across all industries when measured by median pay for graduates with at least 10 years of experience. Computer engineering majors, sharing sixth place with electrical engineering majors, had an annual median salary of $106,000 for those at the mid-career level. When starting out – with five… continue…

How Girls Migrate to STEM Careers

Girl Doing Math
Getting women into STEM careers has got to start somewhere and educators, as well as industry players, increasingly advocate starting them at a young age – even as early as when they enter kindergarten. The industry’s desire to hit the problem hard and early is based on the lackluster percentage of women who currently work in  computing. Women hold only 25 percent of computing jobs and the percentage interested in pursuing a STEM career dropped to 18 percent in 2010… continue…

Hackbright Boot Camp Moves Women Into Coding Careers

Hackbright Academy
Hackbright Academy in San Francisco is a 10-week boot camp with a twist: Not only is the year-old program for women only, all of its graduates began with established careers in non-STEM fields. Through its intensive training, mentoring, final projects and “speed dating” career day, Hackbright has been able to place graduates into positions as software engineers at startups and established organizations including Change.org, Eventbrite, Facebook, Flixster, Heroku, New Relic, Rdio, Perforce, Pinterest, Pivotal Labs, StubHub, SurveyMonkey, Trulia, Twilio and… continue…

MOOCs Get ‘F’ in Delivering on Promise

Posted In Looking in Tech
bigstock-e-learning
It was two years ago that Stanford professor Sebastian Thrun drew 160,000 students from around the globe to his free online course on artificial intelligence, starting a conversation about the coming wave of free online education. But despite claims that free online courses would revolutionize education, the New York Times is reporting that initial results for large-scale courses are rather disappointing. A study from the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education of a million users of massive open online… continue…