Education

Degree Pedigree Matters Less to Today’s Employers

Posted In Looking in Tech
Grads
As they struggle to find experienced technology professionals, managers aren’t as focused on hiring from top-flight schools as they have been in the past. Just two years ago, we reported that employers were growing ever-more picky about hiring candidates with the “right” college degree. But while they’d still love to attract candidates from Stanford, MIT or Carnegie Mellon, today’s low tech unemployment rate means many companies don’t have that luxury. “If you say, ‘I only want a college graduate and… continue…

Report: Boot Camp Graduates Find Jobs, Better Pay

Posted In Looking in Tech
Battle Stripes
There’s an interesting report out from Course Report, a company that provides information to students considering technology boot camps. Billed as “the first cross-school study of its kind,” it indicates that these non-college-based programs actually do help their graduates find jobs. Bear in mind that it’s in Course Report’s interest for students to want to attend a boot camp, so it’s got a definite ax to grind here. That said, the report presents some impressive numbers. Of the 432 graduates… continue…

Why Aren’t Graduates Using Their STEM Degrees?

Posted In Looking in Tech
U.S. Census Bureau
Lots of people earn college degrees in STEM disciplines. But how many of them actually use those degrees for STEM-related work? According to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the answer is, “Not very many.” In a survey of 3.5 million homes, the agency found that almost 75 percent of those who held a bachelor’s degree in a STEM discipline didn’t actually work a STEM job. In a series of interviews with the Washington Post, experts seemed divided about… continue…

Responding to Employers, Colleges Focus on Experience

Posted In Looking in Tech
Cogswell professor Albert Chen with his students
Some tech companies—Google notably among them—are de-emphasizing the use of test scores and GPAs in their hiring, and that’s causing colleges and universities to re-think their approach to technical education, says Tech Page One. One reason can be summed up in this quote Google’s senior vice president of people operations, Laszlo Bock, gave to New York Times columnist Tom Friedman: “When you look at people who don’t go to school and make their way in the world, those are exceptional… continue…

Are More Employers Willing to Pay for Certifications?

Posted In Looking in Tech
Tuition
The overall value of certifications is rising, which can put added pressure on job seekers to make sure their credentials are up to snuff. The good news is some employers may be willing to help you get the training you need. Of course, whether you can convince an employer to pay for training or certifications depends on a number of factors, including the skills, the industry and the company’s attitude toward training in general. Then there’s company size and the… continue…

Do You Need a Degree to Work in Games?

Maya Character
Recently, the International Game Developers Association reported that 40 percent of the respondents to its Developer Satisfaction Survey hold an undergraduate college degree, while 20 percent have a graduate degree and 15 percent hold some kind of trade diploma. A little over half have taken supplemental training in game design in either high school or college. By the numbers, then, it would appear degrees count when it comes to building a career in games. But how much? Click here to… continue…

10 Top College Robotics Programs

Posted In Looking in Tech
MIT Robotics
Love it or fear it, the trend toward building more sophisticated robots isn’t going to abate any time soon. Indeed, given their potential to impact everything from transportation to medicine, the need for engineers skilled in robotics is bound to increase. A tidbit: Mechanical engineering ranked fifth on the National Association of Colleges and Employers’ list of most in-demand bachelor’s degrees. So where do you learn to build robots? Business Insider put together a list of 10 universities where you… continue…

4 IT Master’s Degrees That Could Boost Your Pay

Posted In Looking in Tech
College Money
Specialized master’s degrees in IT are cropping up at an increasing rate to cover everything from data science to technology management to enterprise architecture. Despite the wide range of areas covered, the programs have a common thread: They’re decidedly management-track, representing “a way to understand how technology truly supports the business,” says Priscilla Tate, President and Executive Director of the New York-based Technology Managers Forum. “If you’re a programmer, on-the-job experience is the big thing. But the corporate track is… continue…

Hack Reactor Tries MOOC Approach to Boot Camps

Posted In Looking in Tech
TRAINING---Big-Stock
San Francisco-based boot camp Hack Reactor is launching a remote program that it describes as “the world’s first work-from-home immersive coding school,” reports VentureBeat. Hack Reactor Remote will teach software and Web development, with an emphasis on JavaScript. While online programs usually take a somewhat flexible approach to learning, Hack Reactor Remote puts students into a three-month immersion program in real time, with a live instructor. It mirrors the company’s in-person classes, offering the same coursework and approach of pairing… continue…

‘NanoDegrees’ Offer Entry-Level, Job-Specific Credentials

Working Online
AT&T and the online education company Udacity have unveiled a “NanoDegree” program designed to teach the basic programming skills necessary to qualify for entry-level technology jobs. The program costs $200 a month and can be completed by a working student in six months to a year, without their having to take time off. Starting this fall, courses will be offered in front- and back-end Web development, iOS development and data analysis. More subjects—including Android development—are on the horizon. AT&T says… continue…