Developers

Today’s Developers: Self-Taught and Over-Caffeinated

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Stack Overflow recently surveyed several thousand developers about pretty much everything work-related, and the results paint an interesting portrait of what the developer life is like in 2015. Of the 26,036 people surveyed in 157 countries, 32.4 percent self-identified as full-stack developers, 13.6 percent said they were students, and 10.1 percent indicated they were back-end Web developers. In descending order, other professions included mobile developer (9.1 percent), desktop developer (8.3 percent), front-end Web developer (6.0 percent), enterprise-level lead services developer (2.9… continue…

What You Need to Know About This Year’s WWDC

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Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is taking place June 8-12 at San Francisco’s Moscone Center. As usual, it will include hundreds of sessions and hands-on labs for engineers and developers. Here’s what else you can probably expect: A Preview of the Next iOS and Mac OS X Apple traditionally uses WWDC to show off its latest software. If rumors are correct, the next iOS and Mac OS X versions won’t feature many radical new features or upgrades, but focus… continue…

Ruby vs. Python: A Visual Comparison

Posted In Programming
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Workshape.io, which gives developers the tools to build “visual profiles” of their skills, has released a nifty matchup of Ruby and Python on its corporate blog. In order to create its visualizations, Workshape.io analyzed its dataset of developers who inputted either Python or Ruby as a skill into its profiling system. (Among those developers, Python was more common.) After crunching the data a bit, Workshape.io found that more senior-level developers tended to prefer Ruby, while Python was firmly the providence… continue…

IT Jobs With the Best (and Worst) ROI

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Many IT jobs come with rigorous academic requirements, but not all of those jobs offer high starting salaries and explosive growth potential. Which ones offer the best (and worst) return on investment (ROI)? IT Jobs With the Best ROI DBA Entry-level salary: $59,000 Average salary: $102,446 Although 60 percent of DBAs have a bachelor’s degree, 16 percent have an associate’s degree and 20 percent have some college, according to data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau. Demand exceeds supply, with… continue…

Five Signs You Should Be a Low-Code Developer

Posted In Working in Tech
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By Johan den Haan The demand for custom software has never been higher. There is an app for managing nearly every aspect of our lives, personally and professionally, and the enterprise is particularly hungry for more. Yet CIOs are painfully aware that the demand far exceeds their current ability to deliver. A recent CIO.com poll of more than 500 IT chiefs found that application development is among the top skill set shortages anticipated in 2015. Because of this, there is… continue…

VR Presents Potential UX Issues for Designers

Posted In Fun, Living in Tech
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Over the years, software UX has evolved in ways instantly familiar to anyone who’s ever used a PC or tablet. A great many applications and operating systems feature bars along the top or bottom, loaded with icons or interactive menus. Lots of software also features dynamic left and right rails, similarly thick with clickable elements. The point of this design is to leave the center of the screen free for whatever actions the user wants to take, and it’s worked… continue…

Why I Choose PostgreSQL Over MySQL/MariaDB

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For the past ten years, developers and tech pros have made a game of comparing MySQL and PostgreSQL, with the latter seen by many as technically superior. Those who support PostgreSQL argue that its standards support and ACID compliance outweighs MySQL’s speed. MySQL remains popular thanks to its inclusion in every Linux Web hosting package, meaning that many Web developers have used it; but ever since Oracle bought Sun, which owned the MySQL copyright and trademark, there have been widespread… continue…

How We Data-Mine Related Tech Skills

Posted In Data, Working in Tech
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One of the earliest and most interesting data science projects we’ve embarked on is automatically learning which professional skills relate to one another, based on our data. For instance, if someone lists data science as a skill, it’s likely they also know machine learning, R or python and Hadoop. This project has a lot of potential uses on our site, from suggesting related skills when a user adds technology skills to their profile, to enhancing our search and job recommendation… continue…

Linux Kernel’s Biggest Backers: Corporations

Posted In Programming
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Corporations love Linux. That’s the conclusion of a new report released by the Linux Foundation, which suggested that some 11,800 individual developers from 1,200 companies have contributed to the kernel over the past decade. “The Linux kernel, thus, has become a common resource developed on a massive scale by companies which are fierce competitors in other areas,” the report summarized. Intel is the top corporate developer by number of contributed changes to the kernel, followed by Red Hat, Linaro, Samsung,… continue…

Are Freelance Developer Sites Worth Your Time?

Posted In Programming
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Many websites allow you to look for freelance programming jobs or Web development work. (Hongkiat.com, for example, offers links to several dozen.) The problem for developers in the European Union and the United States is that competition from rivals in developing countries is crushing fees for everybody, as the latter can often undercut on price. This isn’t a situation unique to software development; look at how globalization has compelled manufacturing jobs to move offshore, for example. Check out the latest… continue…