Compensation

For Software Developers, Key to Retention Isn’t Just Money

Posted In Looking in Tech
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What leads an employee to stay with a company, especially when the labor market is good? For many companies seeking to retain their best and brightest, the answer often comes down to tangible perks such as cash or more vacation time. Faced with a tightening market for anyone who can build mobile apps or e-commerce websites, for example, some companies have developed specialized bonus programs for software developers: A recent Dice survey of 700 employers revealed that 16 percent had… continue…

Help Wanted Signs = Dollar Signs for Software Developers

Posted In Looking in Tech
July-Dice-Report-Bonus-Plans-2
Employers are responding to the tight labor market for software developers with a new retention tool: a bonus plan designed specifically for them. Unique bonus programs for software developers have their roots in technology and gaming companies. Now, more employers, in more industries, are adopting targeted plans, according to a recent Dice survey of 700 employers with developers currently on staff. For those companies with bonus plans, one in 10 employers (11 percent) currently have programs tailored exclusively for software… continue…

Where Mobile Developers Should Be Looking for Jobs

Corporate Office Buildings
It seems everyone wants a mobile app these days—even in traditionally low-tech industries like commercial fishing, construction and trucking. That means “a mobile developer with good skills can go anywhere he or she wants to—to any company in any geography,” says Chris Wood, managing partner at Kansas City staffing firm Paige Technologies. While a lot’s been written about the strength of mobile games and the growing market for wearable technologies, there’s strong demand for mobile business apps as well. “There’s… continue…

Company Finds Real Advantages in Pay Transparency

Posted In Looking in Tech
Transparent Calculator
What happens when a company puts all of its salary information out in the open—yours, mine, the CEO’s, everyone’s? Apparently, at least in the experience of the New York City analytics startup SumAll, better communication between staff and management, and not very much drama. SumAll, which has 40 employees, has shared pay information since its early days, according to Business Insider. Founder and CEO Dane Atkinson worked with his first employees to set the salary of each job. As the… continue…

Healthcare IT Consultants Happier Than Full-Timers

Health IT
Consultants involved in implementing healthcare IT solutions are generally happier with their work than their full-time counterparts, according to a survey by Atlanta-based staffing firm Healthcare IT Leaders. More than three quarters—77 percent—of the consultants said they were either “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with their jobs, the survey found. That compares to 64 percent of full-time healthcare IT employees. To put the numbers in context, other surveys have found that 72 percent of workers across all industries report similar… continue…

Silicon Valley Recruiters See Wide Demand for Tech Skills

Silicon Valley Sign
What’s New This Quarter What does the Silicon Valley workforce really look like? If Google, Yahoo and Facebook are indication, it’s very white and male. In May, Google revealed that only 2 percent of its workforce is black, 3 percent Hispanic, and 30 percent Asian; 30 percent is female. “Simply put, Google is not where we want to be when it comes to diversity,” Senior Vice President Laszlo Bock said in a blog post. The census, which covered 26,600 Google… continue…

Taking ‘Any’ 1st Job Could Hurt You for Years

Posted In Looking in Tech
Paths
If you take a job for which you’re overqualified right out of college, you could be setting yourself up to earn less money over time, according to economists from Duke University and the University of North Carolina. The economists used government data that followed Americans who were between 14 and 22 in 1979. Not surprisingly, they found that people were most likely to be “overeducated” when they took their first job. Women were slightly more likely to be in that… continue…

Tech Firms Top List of Best-Paying Companies

Posted In Looking in Tech
Counting Money
Glassdoor’s just unveiled a list of top companies for compensation and benefits. The point of the survey isn’t to measure “happiness”—there’s another list for that—but instead to shed light on whose employees are the most satisfied with the very basic foundation blocks of employment: pay, benefits and perks. Fourteen of the 25 companies listed are in tech, including four of the top five: Google topped the list, Facebook was No. 3, followed by Adobe and Epic Systems (Costco held the… continue…

A Tech Career May Not Require a Four-Year Degree

Posted In Looking in Tech
Math Lecture
Do you need a bachelor’s degree to have a successful career in IT? Not necessarily. In some occupations, professionals with less-costly two-year degrees may actually out-earn people with more education, according to research from Georgetown University. In fact, Georgetown says that 28 percent of people with an associate’s degree make more than the median of workers with a bachelor’s degree. For instance, you can make a nice living as a Web developer, application developer, computer programmer, computer support specialist, game… continue…

Intel Raises Bar on Executive Bonuses

Posted In Looking in Tech
Money
Faced with a weakening PC market and a mobile strategy that has yet to take off, Intel has raised the bar for bonuses and a compensation bumps. The chip giant has increased the number of senior executives and managers who are part of its stock-based compensation program seven-fold to 350 people, up from 50, according to Intel’s letter to shareholders released earlier this week. But starting this year, these stock-based awards will carry more risk on the downside. If the… continue…