College

Taking ‘Any’ 1st Job Could Hurt You for Years

Posted In Looking in Tech
Paths
If you take a job for which you’re overqualified right out of college, you could be setting yourself up to earn less money over time, according to economists from Duke University and the University of North Carolina. The economists used government data that followed Americans who were between 14 and 22 in 1979. Not surprisingly, they found that people were most likely to be “overeducated” when they took their first job. Women were slightly more likely to be in that… continue…

3 Steps to Break Into Mobile Development

Mobile Devices
Michael Turner is a 23-year-old from Rochester, N.Y., who wants to get into mobile app development, though right now his skills are limited to HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Not long ago, he wrote to Dice asking for some tips on how to get started. To give him some guidance, we reached out to two mobile dev veterans: David Yang, Placement Coordinator and lead instructor at the Fullstack Academy of Code in New York, and Eric Schweitzer, a California-based Mac and… continue…

Is College Worth Your Time and Money?

Posted In Looking in Tech
Books and Graduation Cap
A few years ago, Silicon Valley investor Peter Thiel launched the Thiel Fellowship, which offers ambitious young people $100,000 (no strings attached) to focus on self-education and entrepreneurship in lieu of college. With that fellowship, Thiel contributed his own fuel to a long-simmering debate: Is college worth the time and expense? While dropping out of college worked out for a handful of tech entrepreneurs—Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs never obtained degrees—a new report from The New York Times… continue…

Entry-Level Jobs Based More on Enthusiasm Than Degrees

Posted In Looking in Tech
Young Programmer
College graduates can go a long way toward getting themselves a first job by diving early into technology that interests them and developing expertise apart from what they learn in school. A number of tech employers interviewed by Computerworld said that experience is a bigger driver than degrees when it comes to making entry-level hires, and that in today’s world there’s no excuse for not getting your hands dirty. “With a credit card and 10 dollars you can buy a… continue…

Computer Science Enrollments Continue to Grow

Posted In Looking in Tech
Graduates
The number of new undergraduate computing majors continued to grow last year, rising 13.4 percent, according to a report from the Computing Research Association. Although that’s smaller growth than has been seen in years, it does represent the sixth straight period of growth. Enrollments bottomed out in 2007, just before the recession. New computer science enrollments grew by nearly 30 percent in 2011-12 and 23 percent the year before. Last year, 63,873 students enrolled in computer science programs, compared with… continue…

5 Job Hunting Tips for Computer Science Grads

Posted In Looking in Tech
Door Knocker
As strong as the tech job market is, computer science graduates still face challenges during their transition into the real world. While employers prize their smarts, they can be leery of a perceived lack of practical experience and business skills on the part of people looking for their first real job. That doesn’t mean you should be discouraged. It just means you should be ready to approach your search with careful planning, effort and focus. Just ask Veronica Ray. The… continue…

3 Stories on Computer Science Degrees

Posted In Looking in Tech
graduate
Employers like computer science graduates because of their innate smarts, but some shy away from hiring them because of their lack of business and real-world development skills. To help put your degree in context, here are three stories to bear in mind as you transition from the academic world to the workplace. 5 Things to Learn About Computer Science Degrees Computer science degrees come with a common misconception, which often discourages students from pursuing those studies: They’ll turn you into… continue…

IBM and Colleges Partner on Security, Big Data

Posted In Looking in Tech
IBM Logo
IBM is partnering with colleges and universities to prepare workers for the jobs it needs filled, especially in areas like cybersecurity and Big Data. The company provides technology and materials to the schools, and students come out trained and comfortable with its tools. Another eleven schools recently joined Big Blue’s Cyber Security Innovation Program: Fordham University, Georgia Institute of Technology, San Jose State University, Southern Methodist University, Technische Universitat Darmstadt in Germany, Temasek Polytechnic in Singapore, Universidad Cenfotec in Costa… continue…

Knoxville Startup is Serious About Intern Pay

Posted In Looking in Tech
Happy Interns Thumbnail
Knoxville, Tenn.-based startup WeScore.com is paying student interns $22 an hour — three times the national minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. The company, which plans to launch in early 2014, is developing a service to evaluate financial instruments for middle-class consumers through unbiased information. “We certainly could have gone the route that so many companies do and offer ‘experience’ rather than fair compensation for student labor,” CEO Jacqueline J. Stanfill said in a statement. “But it would have been… continue…

5 Tips for Computer Science Freshmen

Posted In Looking in Tech
Cat-thumb-CS-Advice
Starting college is a big adjustment for anyone, but it can be especially daunting for CS majors. After all, they’re jumping into a tough curriculum that’s very different from the work they did in high school. Even those who’ve taken Computer Science will face big changes. To ease the transition, Cat’s collected a few pieces of advice from former CS majors — ideas they wish they’d learned about sooner.