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San Diego Startup Tealium Expanding Dev Team

Enterprise tag-management startup Tealium will hire roughly a half a dozen people for its IT development team by the end of the year. The San Diego-based company, which now employs 130 people worldwide, is looking for folks steeped in Java, Big Data, Linux and database technologies like MongoDB and Amazon Web Services, says Director of Talent Acquisition Joe Grayson.

Tealium LogoTealium’s Web-based service helps digital marketers deploy and manage third-party vendor tags, and then correlate tag-generated data to improve digital marketing operations, customer acquisition campaigns and Big Data initiatives.

Fueling the company’s hiring effort is strong growth. During the first half, the company saw revenues increase 280 percent from the same period in 2012, and landed a $15.6 million third round of venture funding. Some of the company’s clients include Petco, Fox Networks Group and Urban Outfitters.

“We try to avoid getting too lean and resource stretched,” Grayson said.

Tealium developers at work

While Tealium is a startup, it doesn’t require applicants to have lived through a fast-paced, change-on-a-dime culture. In part, that’s because Grayson believes that kind of chaos is part and parcel of working on most any development team.

“My experience with development is it’s always fast and furious,” he says. “The only difference with us is we’re a flatter organization and engineers and developers may appreciate working in a smaller environment.”

In addition to having rock solid skills, Tealium wants professionals who are passionate to the point where they code hobby projects over the weekend. They also look for the ability to work well in small environments and to be adaptive and flexible.

“We don’t have a cookie cutter mold we want people to replicate,” says Grayson. “We want people who get our solution and what we’re trying to do…. People who are passionate about what we do.”

About Dawn Kawamoto

Dawn Kawamoto is the associate editor of Dice. She is an award-winning technology and business reporter, previously working for such publications as CNET's News.com where she reported on a wide range of sectors from enterprise software to mobile computing to Internet darlings and the funding that fueled their growth. In 2002, she was a Gerald Loeb Awards finalist for coverage on Oracle's sales practices.