Programming

A Dice Talent Community

Programming Talent Community

A community for developers and programmers at all levels. We’ll explore available development tools, best practices, as well as mobile and enterprise deployment.

Programming Fundamentals

Following this community adds its articles and discussions to My Tech Feed.

THIS DICE TALENT COMMUNITY SPONSORED BY:

Belong With Innovative Thinkers

CSC offers challenging professional opportunities that will draw on your skills and allow you to identify and achieve your career goals in a supportive environment. CSC also offers many avenues to mastering your chosen profession with exciting work assignments, training opportunities and exposure to new business ideas, knowledge and people. At CSC, you can have a voice in your job, take control of your career path and contribute to the company’s overall operation and growth. Count on us for excellent career opportunities.

The Latest From Dice

How to Build Apps in Swift

app image 1
Earlier this year, Apple executives unveiled Swift, which is meant to eventually replace Objective-C as the programming language of choice for Macs and iOS devices. While Objective-C remains popular, developers frequently complain about how difficult it is to use; Swift’s features will supposedly eliminate at least some of those issues. Despite its ease of use, developers will still need to spend some time learning how the language works. This is the first of a few articles that show how to… continue…

Unpopular Programming Languages That Are Still Lucrative

lenetstan Shutterstock
In a previous article, I discussed the best programming languages to learn over the next year. Most of those were popular languages such as C#, JavaScript, PHP, and Swift. (I also did a follow-up that sang the virtues of Objective-C and Python.) But that’s not the final story on languages: Programmers can also benefit from learning other, less popular languages that could end up paying off big—provided the programmers who pursue them play their proverbial cards right. And as with… continue…

Passing Functions as Parameters

Passing a Function as Parameter in C#
When I first started programming in the late 1970s, I was heavily into Pascal and the concept of passing an address as a parameter was just unheard of outside of academic circles. Procedural programming treated functions as something that were called, not passed around. Had I known C then—which had been around since the early 1970s—I might have been more aware of function pointers. If you don’t know C that well, a pointer is a variable that holds the memory… continue…

Why Don’t Software Engineers Get More Respect?

Tearing Up Resume
Not many people would argue that technology isn’t central to business nowadays. It’s hard to imagine any kind of company of any size operating without some kind of technical system in place to support it—if not drive it. So why don’t software engineers get more respect? That’s what TechCrunch columnist Jon Evans was thinking about the other day. What got him going was a blog post by Michael O. Church, a software engineer who blogged about how differently he was… continue…

Creating Random Access Text in C#

Contents of the Two Files
Back in April I looked at disk folders as a possible alternative to NoSQL or using a relational DB. My conclusion wasn’t encouraging—I was concerned about poor performance, especially on Linux. The use case I examined was for a server that had from 100,000 to 1 million users. I wanted to store and retrieve text files for any user. Those files could vary in length from a few bytes to a few KB. Back in the dark ages—before the Web… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

'Reactive' Development Turns 2.0

posted 9 hours | from electronic convict

developers 76

electronic convict writes First there was "agile" development. Now there's a new software movement—called 'reactive' development—that sets out principles for building resilient and failure-tolerant applications for cloud, mobile, multicore and Web-scale systems. ReadWrite's Matt Asay sat down with Jonas Bonér, the author of the Reactive Manifesto (just released in version 2.0), for a discussion of what, exactly, the reactive movement aims to fix in software development and how we get there from here.

KDE's UI To Bend Toward Simplicity

posted 1 day | from sfcrazy

design 164

sfcrazy (1542989) writes "KDE Software is often criticized for being too complicated for an average user to use. Try setting up Kmail and you would know what I mean. The KDE developers are aware of it and now they are working on making KDE UI simpler. KDE usability team lead Thomas Pfeiffer Thomas prefers a layered feature exposure so that users can enjoy certain advanced features at a later stage after they get accustomed to the basic functionality of the application. He quotes the earlier (pre-Plasma era) vision of KDE 4 – "Anything that makes Linux interesting for technical users (shells, compilation, drivers, minute user settings) will be available; not as the default way of doing things, but at the user's discretion."

Ask Slashdot: How To Avoid Becoming a Complacent Software Developer?

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

!dice 254

An anonymous reader writes: Next year will be the start of my 10th year as a software developer. For the last nice years I've worked for a variety of companies, large and small, on projects of varying sizes. During my career, I have noticed that many of the older software developers are burnt out. They would rather do their 9-5, get paid, and go home. They have little, if any, passion left, and I constantly wonder how they became this way. This contradicts my way of thinking; I consider myself to have some level of passion for what I do, and I enjoy going home knowing I made some kind of difference.

Needless to say, I think I am starting to see the effects of complacency. In my current job, I have a development manager who is difficult to deal with on a technical level. He possesses little technical knowledge of basic JavaEE concepts, nor has kept up on any programming in the last 10 years. There is a push from the upper echelon of the business to develop a new, more scalable system, but they don't realize that my manager is the bottleneck. Our team is constantly trying to get him to agree on software industry standards/best practices, but he doesn't get it and often times won't budge. I'm starting to feel the effects of becoming complacent. What is your advice?

A Beginner's Guide To Programming With Swift

posted 3 days | from nerval's lobster

apple 69

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes Earlier this year, Apple executives unveiled Swift, which is meant to eventually replace Objective-C as the programming language of choice for Macs and iOS devices. Now that iOS 8's out, a lot of developers who build apps for Apple's platforms will likely give Swift a more intensive look. While Apple boasts that Swift makes programming easy, it'll take some time to learn how the language works. A new walkthrough by developer David Bolton shows how to build a very simple app in Swift, complete with project files (hosted on SourceForge) so you can follow along. A key takeaway: while some Swift features do make programming easier, there's definitely a learning curve here.

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison Steps Down

posted 3 days | from mrspoonsi

business 140

mrspoonsi writes Oracle founder Larry Ellison is stepping down as CEO. He will be replaced by two executives. Former Oracle presidents Safra Catz and Mark Hurd will be co-CEOs. Ellison will be the Executive Chairman of Oracle's Board, and the company's CTO. Oracle's shares are off by 3% on the news. "Larry has made it very clear that he wants to keep working full time and focus his energy on product engineering, technology development and strategy," said the Oracle Board's Presiding Director, Dr. Michael Boskin.

An Open Source Pitfall? Mozilla Labs Closed, Quietly

posted 3 days | from mikejuk

software 111

mikejuk writes with this excerpt: When Google Labs closed there was an outcry. How could an organization just pull the rug from under so many projects? At least Google announced what it was doing. Mozilla, it seems since there is no official record, just quietly tiptoes away — leaving the lights on since the Mozilla Labs Website is still accessible. It is accessible but when you start to explore the website you notice it is moribund with the last blog post being December 2013 with the penultimate one being September 2013. The fact that it is gone is confirmed by recent blog posts and by the redeployment of the people who used to run it. The projects that survived have been moved to their own websites. It isn't clear what has happened to the Hatchery -the incubator that invited new ideas from all and sundry. One of the big advantages of open source is the ease with which a project can be started. One of the big disadvantages of open source is the ease with which projects can be allowed to die — often without any clear cut time of death. It seems Mozilla applies this to groups and initiatives as much as projects. This isn't good. The same is true at companies that aren't open source centric, though, too, isn't it?

Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

posted 4 days | from anonymous coward

developers 377

An anonymous reader writes:Linux creator Linus Torvalds is well-known for his strong opinions on many technical things. But when it comes to systemd, the init system that has caused a fair degree of angst in the Linux world, Torvalds is neutral. "When it comes to systemd, you may expect me to have lots of colorful opinions, and I just don't," Torvalds says. "I don't personally mind systemd, and in fact my main desktop and laptop both run it." Torvalds added, "I think many of the 'original ideals' of UNIX are these days more of a mindset issue than necessarily reflecting reality of the situation. There's still value in understanding the traditional UNIX "do one thing and do it well" model where many workflows can be done as a pipeline of simple tools each adding their own value, but let's face it, it's not how complex systems really work, and it's not how major applications have been working or been designed for a long time. It's a useful simplification, and it's still true at some level, but I think it's also clear that it doesn't really describe most of reality."

Ask Slashdot: Have You Experienced Fear Driven Development?

posted 4 days | from nerdyalien

developers 231

nerdyalien writes: A few years back, I worked for a large-scale web development project in southeast Asia. Despite formally adopting Agile/Scrum, development was driven based on fear imposed by managers. Scott Hanselman defines Fear-Driven-Development as having three parts. 1) Organizational fear has "worried about making mistakes, breaking the build, or causing bugs that the organization increases focus on making paper, creating excessive process, and effectively standing in the way of writing code." 2) There's also fear of changing code, which comes from a complex, poorly-understood, or unmaintainable codebase. 3) The most common one is fear of losing your job, which can lead to developers checking in barely-functioning code and managers committing to a death march rather than admit failure. My project ran four times its initial estimation, and included horrendous 18-hour/day, 6 day/week crunches with pizza dinners. Is FDD here to stay?

College Students: Want To Earn More? Take a COBOL Class

posted 4 days | from jfruh

stats 270

jfruh writes: With a lot of debate over the value of a college education, here's a data point students can use: at one Texas college, students who took an elective COBOL class earned on average $10,000 more a year upon graduation than classmates who hadn't. COBOL, dropped from many curricula years ago as an outdated language, is tenaciously holding on in the industry, as many universities are belatedly starting to realize.