Programming

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The Latest From Dice

What Are the Best Coding Boot Camps?

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For anyone who wants to break into a programming career, coding “boot camps” can offer a lot of benefits: In exchange for a few weeks of your time, you learn a new programming language that can eventually translate into a well-paying job. But which boot camps are worth the time and money? Switchup, which collects data on boot camps and programming courses throughout the country, has a new list of what it considers the top 32 coding boot camps. In… continue…

Linux Kernel’s Biggest Backers: Corporations

Posted In Programming
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Corporations love Linux. That’s the conclusion of a new report released by the Linux Foundation, which suggested that some 11,800 individual developers from 1,200 companies have contributed to the kernel over the past decade. “The Linux kernel, thus, has become a common resource developed on a massive scale by companies which are fierce competitors in other areas,” the report summarized. Intel is the top corporate developer by number of contributed changes to the kernel, followed by Red Hat, Linaro, Samsung,… continue…

Building a Dungeon Generator in C#

Posted In Programming
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Procedural dungeon generation is a fun exercise for programmers. Despite the crude interface, such games continue to spark interest. A quarter century ago, I wrote a dungeon generator in procedural Pascal; now I’ve taken that old code and converted it to C#. (It’s amazing just how fast it runs on a five-year-old i7 950 PC with 16GB of RAM.) If you want to follow along, you can find my code for the project on SourceForge.  The first part of the… continue…

5 Tips to Learn Programming Faster

Posted In Programming
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The tech sector has long been considered one of the best for job seekers, and two recent reports suggest that demand for tech careers will only continue to grow. This is particularly good news for aspiring software developers, computer programmers, and Web developers, who all make the Top 10 list of best Technology Jobs of 2015, according to U.S. News and World Report. Check out the latest programming jobs. There is one downside to this, however: Learning to program is… continue…

JavaScript Tops GitHub’s Most Popular Languages

Posted In Programming
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What are the top programming languages on GitHub? According to GitHut, a website that attempts to estimate and visualize the repository’s most popular languages, JavaScript topped the list in the fourth quarter of 2014, followed by Java, Python, CSS, PHP, Ruby, C++, C, and Shell. With roughly 3.4 million users and 16.7 million repositories, GitHub offers a comprehensive view into not only the most popular languages, but which ones are on the rise; while the top five languages on GitHut’s… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Source 2 Will Also Be Free

posted 31 mins | from jones_supa

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jones_supa writes Valve is officially debuting its Source 2 engine at GDC this week alongside a host of other new technologies, and it's expected to launch at a competitive price: free. The news of its release coincides with Epic making Unreal Engine 4 free-to-download and Unity announcing a full-featured free version of Unity 5. Valve is making a show of marketing Source 2 not just to developers, but game creators of all stripes — including Steam Workshop creators. "With Source 2, our focus is on increasing creator productivity," stated Valve engineer Jay Stelly in a press release confirming the launch. "Given how important user generated content is becoming, Source 2 is designed not for just the professional developer, but enabling gamers themselves to participate in the creation and development of their favorite games." It's worth noting that Valve also plans to release a version of Source 2 that's compatible with Vulkan, the open-standard graphics API that's considered heir apparent to OpenGL.

GitLab Acquires Gitorious

posted 2 days | from sckirklan

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New submitter sckirklan writes with news that code repository GitLab has purchased rival service Gitorious. Gitorious users are now able to import their projects into GitLab. They must do so by the end of May, because Gitorious will shut down on June 1st. Rolf Bjaanes, Gitorious CEO, gives some background on the reasons for the acquisition: “At Gitorious we saw more and more organizations adopting GitLab. Due to decreased income from on-premises customers, running the free Gitorious.org was no longer sustainable. GitLab was solving the same problem that we were, but was solving it better.” “This acquisition will accelerate the growth of GitLab. With more than 100,000 organizations using it, it is already the most used on-premise solution for Git repository management, and bringing Gitorious into the fold will significantly increase that footprint.” says Sytse Sijbrandij, GitLab CEO.

AMD Enters Virtual Reality Fray With LiquidVR SDK At GDC

posted 2 days | from mojokid

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MojoKid writes: AMD jumped into the virtual reality arena today by announcing that its new LiquidVR SDK will help developers customize VR content for AMD hardware. "The upcoming LiquidVR SDK makes a number of technologies available which help address obstacles in content, comfort and compatibility that together take the industry a major step closer to true, life-like presence across all VR games, applications, and experiences," AMD representatives said in a statement. Oculus is one of the VR companies that will be working with AMD's LiquidVR SDK, and likes what it's seen so far. "Achieving presence in a virtual world continues to be one of the most important elements to delivering amazing VR," said Brendan Iribe, CEO of Oculus. "We're excited to have AMD working with us on their part of the latency equation, introducing support for new features like asynchronous timewarp and late latching, and compatibility improvements that ensure that Oculus' users have a great experience on AMD hardware."

Study: Refactoring Doesn't Improve Code Quality

posted 2 days | from itwbennett

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itwbennett writes: A team of researchers in Sri Lanka set out to test whether common refactoring techniques resulted in measurable improvements in software quality, both externally (e.g., Is the code more maintainable?) and internally (e.g., Number of lines of code). Here's the short version of their findings: Refactoring doesn't make code easier to analyze or change (PDF); it doesn't make code run faster; and it doesn't result in lower resource utilization. But it may make code more maintainable.

Why We Should Stop Hiding File-Name Extensions

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes 14 years after the Anna Kournikova virus took advantage of users' ignorance about file-name extensions in order to wreak worldwide havoc, virus writers and hackers are still taking advantage of the tendency of popular consumer operating systems to hide file-name extensions: Windows users still need to activate extension visibility manually – even though email-transmitted viruses depend most on less savvy users who will never do this. Additionally applications on even the latest versions of Apple's OSX operating system still require the user to 'opt in' to including a file-name extension during an initial save. In looking at some of the eccentricities of the modern user experience, this article argues that it might be time to admit that users need to understand, embrace and responsibly use the only plain-text, obvious indicator of what a file actually is.

Khronos Group Announces Vulkan To Compete Against DirectX 12

posted 2 days | from phopojijo

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Phopojijo writes The Khronos Group has announced the Vulkan API for compute and graphics. Its goal is to compete against DirectX 12. It has some interesting features, such as queuing to multiple GPUs and an LLVM-based bytecode for its shading language to remove the need for a compiler from the graphics drivers. Also, the API allows graphics card vendors to support Vulkan with drivers back to Windows XP "and beyond."

Ask Slashdot: Which Classic OOP Compiled Language: Objective-C Or C++?

posted 3 days | from qbertino

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Qbertino writes: I've been trying to pick up a classic, object-oriented, compiled language since the early 90s, but have never gotten around to it. C++ was always on my radar, but I'm a little torn to-and-fro with Objective-C. Objective-C is the obvious choice if you also want to make money developing for Mac OS X, but for the stuff I want to do, both languages would suffice on all platforms. I do want to start out on x86 Linux, though, and also use it as my main development platform. Yes, I know quite a few other languages, but I want to get into a widespread compiled language that has good ties into FOSS. Both Objective-C and C++ fit that bill. What do you recommend? How do these two programming languages compare with each other, and how easy is cross-platform development in either? (Primarily GUI-free, "headless" applications.)

Unreal Engine 4 Is Now Free

posted 3 days | from jones_supa

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jones_supa writes In 2014, Epic Games took the step of making Unreal Engine 4 available to everyone by subscription for $19 per month. Today, this general-purpose game engine is available to everyone for free. This includes future updates, the full C++ source code of the engine, documentation, and all sorts of bonus material. You can download the engine and use it for everything from game development, education, architecture, and visualization to VR, film and animation. The business scheme that Epic set in the beginning, remains the same: when you ship a commercial game or application, you pay a 5% royalty on gross revenue after the first $3,000 per product, per quarter. Epic strived to create a simple and fair arrangement in which they succeed only when your product succeeds.

Oracle Sues 5 Oregon Officials For 'Improper Influence'

posted 5 days | from spztoid

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SpzToid writes: Following up on an earlier Slashdot story, the Oracle Corporation has filed a rather timely suit against five of former governor John Kitzhaber's staff for their "improper influence" in the decision to shutter the Cover Oregon healthcare website, while blaming Oracle to defuse the political consequences. Oracle argues the website was ready to go before the state decided to switch to the federal exchange in April.

"The work on the exchange was complete by February 2014, but going live with the website and providing a means for all Oregonians to sign up for health insurance coverage didn't match the former-Governor's re-election strategy to 'go after' Oracle," Oracle spokeswoman Deborah Hellinger said in a statement.

Kitzhaber resigned last week amid criminal probes into an influence-peddling scandal involving allegations that his fiancée used her position in his office for personal gain.

Blu-Ray Players Hackable Via Malicious Discs

posted 5 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Some Blu-Ray disc interactive features use a Java variant for UIs and applications. Stephen Tomkinson just posted a blog discussing how specially created Blu-Ray discs can be used to hack various players using exploits related to their Java usage. He hacked one Linux-based, network-connected player to get root access through vulnerabilities introduced by the vendor. He did the same thing against Windows Blu-Ray player software. Tomkinson was then able to combine both, along with detection techniques, into a single disc.