Programming

A Dice Talent Community

Programming Talent Community

A community for developers and programmers at all levels. We’ll explore available development tools, best practices, as well as mobile and enterprise deployment.

Click here for information about programming fundamentals

Following this community adds its articles and discussions to My Tech Feed.

THIS DICE TALENT COMMUNITY SPONSORED BY:

Belong With Innovative Thinkers

CSC offers challenging professional opportunities that will draw on your skills and allow you to identify and achieve your career goals in a supportive environment. CSC also offers many avenues to mastering your chosen profession with exciting work assignments, training opportunities and exposure to new business ideas, knowledge and people. At CSC, you can have a voice in your job, take control of your career path and contribute to the company’s overall operation and growth. Count on us for excellent career opportunities.

The Latest From Dice

Substitute PostgreSQL for Your NoSQL Needs

pking 4th shutterstock
Over the past five years or so, NoSQL databases have enjoyed a spike in popularity compared to relational (i.e., SQL-driven) databases, thanks in large part to industries such as online gaming. A typical NoSQL database can write data 10 or 20 times faster than a relational one, although this speed comes at a price: The data is cached in memory longer before being written to disk, so the data update remains inconsistent longer. As a result, applications that require fast… continue…

Python 3 String-Processing Causing Problems?

Python
Widely known as a general-purpose programming language, Python is excellent at string handling—but a few things have changed between Python 2 and Python 3. This article is a reminder of what Python strings can (still) do for you, as well as a look at what you need to know about Python 3 strings. We discussed some of these Python 3 changes in a previous article. Python 3 relies on Unicode Characters, more specifically UTF-8 as the default source encoding. This… continue…

Building Apps in Swift: Using Storyboards

1
In our previous article on building apps with Apple’s Swift, we demonstrated how to use view controllers and views in code to craft a simple app. Before we begin with this next lesson, using storyboards to build an app in Swift, it’s worth revisiting that first piece. (The code that accompanies the piece is stored on SourceForge as “First Example.zip.”) Remember that view controllers in Swift manage two roles: they controls views on a page or part of a page,… continue…

A Look at 5 Free Python Editors

PyScripter
Python programming can be done from the command line, but an IDE makes life so much easier. With so many options out there, which one should you use? To help you decide, I’ve looked at five Python editors (all free). Although Python has been more of a Linux programming language, the last few years have seen its increasing use on Windows, so many of the five are cross-platform. They are: Eclipse plus PyDev and other plugins PyScripter Eric Python IDE… continue…

How to Build Apps in Swift

app image 1
Earlier this year, Apple executives unveiled Swift, which is meant to eventually replace Objective-C as the programming language of choice for Macs and iOS devices. While Objective-C remains popular, developers frequently complain about how difficult it is to use; Swift’s features will supposedly eliminate at least some of those issues. Despite its ease of use, developers will still need to spend some time learning how the language works. This is the first of a few articles that show how to… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Attack of the One-Letter Programming Languages

posted 14 hours | from snydeq

developers 117

snydeq writes: The programming world is fast proliferating with one-letter programming languages, many of which tackle specific problems in ways worthy of a cult following, writes InfoWorld's Peter Wayner in this somewhat tongue-in-cheek roundup of the more interesting entrants among this trend. "They're all a bit out there, with the possible exception of C. ... Each offers compelling ideas that could do the trick in solving a particular problem you need fixed.'"

2014 Hour of Code: Do Ends Justify Disney Product Placement Means?

posted 2 days | from theodp

education 125

theodp writes "The purpose of product placement/product integration/branded entertainment," explains Disney in a job posting, "is to give a brand exposure outside of their traditional media buy." So, one imagines the folks in Disney Marketing must be thrilled that Disney Frozen princesses Anna and Elsa will be featured in the 'signature tutorial' for CSEdWeek's 2014 Hour of Code, which aims to introduce CS to 100 million schoolkids — including a sizable captive audience — in the weeks before Christmas. "Thanks to Disney Interactive," announced Code.org CEO Hadi Partovi, "Code.org's signature tutorial for the 2014 Hour of Code features Disney Infinity versions of Disney's 'Frozen' heroines Anna and Elsa!." Partovi adds, "The girl-power theme of the tutorial is a continuation of our efforts to expand diversity in computer science and broaden female participation in the field, starting with younger students." In the tutorial, reports the LA Times, "students will learn to write code to help Anna and Elsa draw snowflakes and snowmen, and perform magical 'ice craft.' Disney is also donating $100,000 to support Code.org's efforts to bring computer science education to after-school programs nationwide."

Upgrading the Turing Test: Lovelace 2.0

posted 3 days | from mrspoonsi

technology 68

mrspoonsi tips news of further research into updating the Turing test. As computer scientists have expanded their knowledge about the true domain of artificial intelligence, it has become clear that the Turing test is somewhat lacking. A replacement, the Lovelace test, was proposed in 2001 to strike a clearer line between true AI and an abundance of if-statements. Now, professor Mark Reidl of Georgia Tech has updated the test further (PDF). He said, "For the test, the artificial agent passes if it develops a creative artifact from a subset of artistic genres deemed to require human-level intelligence and the artifact meets certain creative constraints given by a human evaluator. Creativity is not unique to human intelligence, but it is one of the hallmarks of human intelligence."

Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

posted 4 days | from enbody

business 33

enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

It's Not Developers Slowing Things Down, It's the Process

posted 4 days | from anonymous coward

developers 185

An anonymous reader writes: Software engineers understand the pace of writing code, but frequently managers don't. One line of code might take 1 minute, and another line of code might take 1 day. But generally, everything averages out, and hitting your goals is more a function of properly setting your goals than of coding quickly or slowly. Sprint.ly, a company than analyzes productivity, has published some data to back this up. The amount of time actually developing a feature was a small and relatively consistent portion of its lifetime as a work ticket. The massively variable part of the process is when "stakeholders are figuring out specs and prioritizing work." The top disrupting influences (as experienced devs will recognize) are unclear and changing requirements. Another big cause of slowdowns is interrupting development work on one task to work on a second one. The article encourages managers to let devs contribute to the process and say "No" if the specs are too vague. Is there anything you'd add to this list?

As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines

posted 5 days | from reifman

amazon 495

reifman writes Amazon's hiring so quickly in Seattle that it's on pace to employ 45,000 people or seven percent of the city. But, 75% of these hires are male. While Seattle women earned 86 cents per dollar earned by men in 2012, today, they make only 78 cents per dollar. In "Amageddon: Seattle's Increasingly Obvious Future", I review these and other surprising facts about Amazon's growing impact on the city: we're the fastest growing — now larger than Boston, we have the fastest rising rents, the fourth worst traffic, we're only twelfth in public transit, we're the fifth whitest and getting whiter, we're experiencing record levels of property crime and the amount of office space under construction has nearly doubled to 3.2 million square feet in the past year.

"Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" Pulled From Amazon

posted 5 days | from clcto

books 554

New submitter clcto writes Back in 2010, Computer Engineer Barbie was released. Now, with the attention brought to the Frozen themed programming game from Disney and Code.org, unwanted attention has been given to the surprisingly real book "Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer". So much so, that Mattel has pulled the book from Amazon. The book shows Barbie attempting to write a computer game. However, instead of writing the code, she enlists two boys to write the code as she just does the design. She then proceeds to infect her computer and her sister's computer with a virus and must enlist the boys to fix that for her as well. In the end she takes all the credit, and proclaims "I guess I can be a computer engineer!" A blog post commenting on the book (as well as giving pictures of the book and its text) has been moved to Gizmodo due to high demand.

Ask Slashdot: Professionally Packaged Tools For Teaching Kids To Program?

posted 7 days | from binestar

developers 107

Binestar writes: I've been doing IT consulting for years, but I'm not a programmer beyond bash scripting, perl scripts to make administration easier, and batch files to make Windows easier. I recently found an online course for modding Minecraft that my 9-year-old daughter is really enjoying (she built a custom sword that shoots lightning). Does anyone have any recommendations on online courses that would be age appropriate and worth the investment? It's been easy to get her interested in the Minecraft modding course because, as any parent with young children knows, Minecraft is kinda popular...

The course she's taking now is teaching her Eclipse and Gimp, and I'm sure there are other tools installed that they haven't had her open yet. What other vendors have stuff worth introducing her to? I've also started looking at things like the Kano and Learn to Mod, but as a non-programmer, I'm not really sure which are most useful for introduction and which are accomplishing what they claim vs. being a waste of money/time.

Anyone have experience or suggestions to help sort this out?

HTML5: It's Already Everywhere, Even In Mobile

posted 1 week | from electronic convict

html5 133

electronic convict writes: Tom Dale has never been shy, and in a Q&A with Matt Asay on ReadWrite, the EmberJS co-founder and JavaScript evangelist makes the outspoken claim that open Web technologies are already everywhere, even in native mobile apps, and that it's only a matter of time before they catch up to "all the capabilities of a native, proprietary platform." Take that, Web-is-dead doomsayers.

Dale has plenty more to say, calling Google an "adolescent behemoth" that's belatedly embracing open-Web technologies in mobile, lauding Apple's Nitro JS engine and belittling the idea that Web apps have to look and feel the same as native apps for the open Web to triumph. His bottom line: "[I]t's not hard to see that the future of the Web on mobile is a happy one."