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The Latest From Dice

Ruby vs. Python: A Visual Comparison

Posted In Programming
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Workshape.io, which gives developers the tools to build “visual profiles” of their skills, has released a nifty matchup of Ruby and Python on its corporate blog. In order to create its visualizations, Workshape.io analyzed its dataset of developers who inputted either Python or Ruby as a skill into its profiling system. (Among those developers, Python was more common.) After crunching the data a bit, Workshape.io found that more senior-level developers tended to prefer Ruby, while Python was firmly the providence… continue…

Why I Choose PostgreSQL Over MySQL/MariaDB

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For the past ten years, developers and tech pros have made a game of comparing MySQL and PostgreSQL, with the latter seen by many as technically superior. Those who support PostgreSQL argue that its standards support and ACID compliance outweighs MySQL’s speed. MySQL remains popular thanks to its inclusion in every Linux Web hosting package, meaning that many Web developers have used it; but ever since Oracle bought Sun, which owned the MySQL copyright and trademark, there have been widespread… continue…

Linus Torvalds Was (Sorta) Wrong About C++

Posted In Programming
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With all the new (and new-ish) languages out there, you might wonder why it’s still worth learning C++, a language first invented in 1983. Wedged amidst lower-level languages such as C, C++ went through a spike in popularity in the mid-‘90s, when developers realized it was easily translatable to assembly language; but today’s higher-level languages abstract the processor even further away. C++ has a lot in common with its parent, C; but C++ does a good bit more behind the… continue…

Best Programming Languages for Linux Devs

Posted In Programming
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Ask any knowledgeable developer to name the first programming language they would associate with Linux, and he or she would likely answer C, given the closely aligned history of Unix and C. But in the 24 years since it first appeared, Linux has probably been home to every programming language known to humankind: Not just obvious languages such as C, C++, Python and Java but also C# (Mono), Fortran, Pascal, COBOL and Lisp and many more. Check out the latest… continue…

What Are the Best Coding Boot Camps?

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For anyone who wants to break into a programming career, coding “boot camps” can offer a lot of benefits: In exchange for a few weeks of your time, you learn a new programming language that can eventually translate into a well-paying job. But which boot camps are worth the time and money? Switchup, which collects data on boot camps and programming courses throughout the country, has a new list of what it considers the top 32 coding boot camps. In… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

MIT Debuts Integer Overflow Debugger

posted 4 days | from msm1267

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msm1267 writes Students from M.I.T. have devised a new and more efficient way to scour raw code for integer overflows, the troublesome programming bugs that serve as a popular exploit vector for attackers and often lead to the crashing of systems. Researchers from the school's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) last week debuted the platform dubbed DIODE, short for Directed Integer Overflow Detection. As part of an experiment, the researchers tested DIODE on code from five different open source applications. While the system was able to generate inputs that triggered three integer overflows that were previously known, the system also found 11 new errors. Four of the 11 overflows the team found are apparently still lingering in the wild, but the developers of those apps have been informed and CSAIL is awaiting confirmation of fixes.

No, It's Not Always Quicker To Do Things In Memory

posted 5 days | from itwbennett

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itwbennett writes: It's a commonly held belief among software developers that avoiding disk access in favor of doing as much work as possible in-memory will results in shorter runtimes. To test this assumption, researchers from the University of Calgary and the University of British Columbia compared the efficiency of alternative ways to create a 1MB string and write it to disk. The results consistently found that doing most of the work in-memory to minimize disk access was significantly slower than just writing out to disk repeatedly (PDF).

Michael Stonebraker Wins Turing Award

posted 5 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Michael Stonebraker, an MIT researcher who has revolutionized the field of database management systems and founded multiple successful database companies, has won the Association for Computing Machinery's $1 million A.M. Turing Award, often referred to as "the Nobel Prize of computing." In his previous work at the University of California at Berkeley, Stonebraker developed two of his most influential systems, Ingres and Postgres (PDF), which provide the foundational ideas — and, in many cases, specific source code — that spawned several contemporary database products, including IBM's Informix and EMC's Greenplum. Ingres was one of the first relational databases, which provide a more organized way to store multiple kinds of entities – and which now serve as the industry standard for business storage. Postgres, meanwhile, integrated Ingres' ideas with object-oriented programming, enabling users to natively map objects and their attributes into databases. This new notion of "object-relational" databases could be used to represent and manipulate complex data, like computer-aided design, geospatial data, and time series.

Developers and the Fear of Apple

posted 5 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: UI designer Eli Schiff has posted an article about the "climate of fear" surrounding Apple in the software development community. He points out how developers who express criticism in an informal setting often recant when their words are being recorded, and how even moderate public criticism is often prefaced by flattery and endorsements.

Beyond that, the industry has learned that they can't rely on Apple's walled garden to make a profit. The opaque app review process, the race to the bottom on pricing, and Apple's resistance to curation of the App Store are driving "independent app developers into larger organizations and venture-backed startups." Apple is also known to cut contact with developers if they release for Android first. The "climate of fear" even affects journalists, who face not only stonewalling from Apple after negative reporting, but also a brigade of Apple fans and even other journalists trying to paint them as anti-Apple.

A Bechdel Test For Programmers?

posted 6 days | from nerval's lobster

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Nerval's Lobster writes In order for a movie or television show to pass the Bechdel Test (named after cartoonist and MacArthur genius Alison Bechdel), it must feature two female characters, have those two characters talk to one another, and have those characters talk to one another about something other than a man. A lot of movies and shows don't pass. How would programming culture fare if subjected to a similar test? One tech firm, 18F, decided to find out after seeing a tweet from Laurie Voss, CTO of npm, which explained the parameters of a modified Bechdel Test. According to Voss, a project that passes the test must feature at least one function written by a woman developer, that calls a function written by another woman developer. 'The conversation started with us quickly listing the projects that passed the Bechdel coding test, but then shifted after one of our devs then raised a good point,' read 18F's blog posting on the experiment. 'She said some of our projects had lots of female devs, but did not pass the test as defined.' For example, some custom languages don't have functions, which means a project built using those languages would fail even if written by women. Nonetheless, both startups and larger companies could find the modified Bechdel Test a useful tool for opening up a discussion about gender balance within engineering and development teams.

Facebook Engineering Tool Mimics Dodgy Network Connectivity

posted 6 days | from itwbennett

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itwbennett writes: Facebook has released an open source application called Augmented Traffic Control that can simulate the connectivity of a cell phone accessing an app over a 2G, Edge, 3G, or LTE network. It can also simulate weak and erratic WiFi connections. The simulations can give engineers an estimate of how long it would take a user to download a file, for instance, given varying network connections. It can help engineers re-create problems that crop up only on very slow networks.

Microsoft Releases Windows 10 SDK

posted 6 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft today launched developer tools for the Windows 10 Technical Preview, including a software development kit (SDK). Developers can use the new tools, currently in preview, to start building universal Windows apps for Microsoft's upcoming operating system. A universal Windows app is Microsoft's verbiage for an app that can run across different form factors, including PCs, tablets, and phones. Developers can publish these apps in the Windows Store, which will be available across all types of Windows 10 devices.

Modern PHP: New Features and Good Practices

posted 7 days | from michael ross

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Michael Ross writes In recent years, JavaScript has enjoyed a dramatic renaissance as it has been transformed from a browser scripting tool primarily used for special effects and form validation on web pages, to a substantial client-side programming language. Similarly, on the server side, after years as the target of criticism, the PHP computer programming language is seeing a revival, partly due to the addition of new capabilities, such as namespaces, traits, generators, closures, and components, among other improvements. PHP enthusiasts and detractors alike can learn more about these changes from the book Modern PHP: New Features and Good Practices, authored by Josh Lockhart. Keep reading for the rest of Michael's review.

RMS Talks Net Neutrality, Patents, and More

posted 7 days | from alphadogg

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alphadogg writes "According to Richard Stallman, godfather of the free software movement, Facebook is a "monstrous surveillance engine," tech companies working for patent reform aren't going nearly far enough, and parents must lobby their children's schools to keep data private and provide free software alternatives. The free software guru touched on a host of topics in his keynote Saturday at the LibrePlanet conference, a Free Software Foundation gathering at the Scala Center at MIT.