H-1B Visas Proving Lucrative for Engineers, Leads

Posted In Data, Looking in Tech
Swizec
Ever wanted to know how much H-1B holders make per year? Developer Swizec Teller, who is about to apply for an H-1B visa, took data from the U.S. Department of Labor and visualized it in a series of graphs that break down H-1B salaries on a state-by-state basis. Teller found that the average engineer with an H-1B makes $87,000 a year, a good deal higher than developers ($74,000) and programmers ($61,000) with the same visa. “Don’t call yourself a programmer,”… continue…

Want a Starring Role in Dice’s Upcoming Ad Campaign?

Posted In Living in Tech
shutterstock_Aleksandr Kurganov
If you live in San Francisco, Austin, Seattle, or New York City, you might have noticed our Hottest Tech Talent billboards popping up over the past few months. Thanks to the magnificent response to those billboards, we’re going to extend this campaign with some new photography, while continuing to use real tech professionals to highlight all the incredible things our industry has to offer. If you’re interested in appearing 50 feet tall over the skyline of a major metropolitan area,… continue…

Billion-Dollar Startup? Boring.

shutterstock_isak55
Once upon a time, a startup valued at more than $1 billion was a rare thing indeed. Now, according to data from the Wall Street Journal, it seems increasingly commonplace, with some 73 venture-backed startups currently valued at more than $1 billion. Those companies include Uber ($41.2 billion), Palantir ($15 billion), SpaceX ($12 billion), Airbnb ($10 billion), and Snapchat ($10 billion). More than 20 of them are headquartered in San Francisco; five are in New York; and four take up… continue…

Want to Test iOS 9? You Might Get Your Chance

Posted In Living in Tech, Mobile
iOS on iPad
Apple isn’t exactly a company known for its openness, so the rumors that it’ll offer a public beta program for the upcoming iOS 9 comes as a bit of a surprise. According to 9to5Mac and TechCrunch, Apple would use the program to avoid at least some of the unpleasant surprises that sometimes accompany a software release’s first days in the wild. Apple has caught some flak in recent months from users disappointed in what many perceive as the software’s increasing… continue…

Getting Rid of Lenovo’s Superfish Vulnerability

Posted In Data, Living in Tech
SuperFish
As you may have heard by this point, Lenovo loaded an adware package called Superfish Visual Discovery onto many of its devices. Annoying? Absolutely: Nobody likes an add-on that inserts sponsored links into your search results. But Superfish became downright dangerous when security researchers realized it could easily double as a handy tool for a man-in-the-middle attack, thanks to its ability to always appear as a “Trusted Party” to websites. The revelations have left Lenovo scrambling to repair the damage.… continue…

Your Job Interview Starts on the Commute

Twitter Job Interview
Your job interview starts in the lobby of your prospective employer’s building, goes the old cliché. In other words, treat everybody you meet nicely, because word of your behavior will inevitably filter back to your interviewer. But what if that advice is wrong? What if your interview starts on your commute? Matt Buckland, head of talent and recruiting at London-based Forward Partners, was on his way to work one recent morning when he accidentally blocked another man from exiting the… continue…

In Space, a Laptop Doubles as a VR Headset

Posted In Fun, Living in Tech
Astronaut VR
On Earth, the engineers and developers in charge of building the Oculus Rift and other virtual-reality headsets are concerned about weight: Who wants to strap on something so heavy it cricks their neck? But in space, weight isn’t an issue, which is why an astronaut can strap a laptop to his head via a heavy and complicated-looking rig and use it as a virtual-reality device. NASA astronaut Terry Virts recently did just that to train himself in the use of… continue…

Silicon Valley’s Car Dreams Could Boost Your Career

Tesla
The big news in the technology world this week is Apple’s reported decision to start some sort of automobile division, staffed with some very smart people who specialize in electric batteries and other components. According to The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and other sources, Apple is building an electric, possibly self-driving vehicle that could compete with Tesla, arguably the world’s premier maker of electric automobiles. Apple isn’t the only tech giant exploring the possibilities of the automotive… continue…

Forging a Career Path When the Route Is Unclear

Posted In Working in Tech
shutterstock_Sergey Nivens
Up-and-coming companies seldom offer well-defined career paths that guide IT professionals from one position to the next. Enterprising employees are instead expected to identify an emerging role or need and pilot themselves to the next career opportunity. “You have to know where the company and your particular niche is headed to steer your own IT career,” said Katy Piotrowski, CEO of Career Solutions Group, a career planning firm based in Fort Collins, Colo. “The key is finding an opportunity that… continue…

IBM Thinks Data Can Improve Football Stadiums

Posted In Data, Living in Tech
IBM Atlanta Stadium
IBM has spent years highlighting its data-analytics capabilities in the context of professional sports. At the U.S. Open tennis tournament, for example, it sets up “digital walls” that display players’ chances of winning, among other data points. But now Big Blue plans on taking its sports relationship to a whole new level. According to Bloomberg, IBM is weaving its products into the infrastructure of an under-construction stadium in Atlanta. Not only will IBM technology manage essential services such as security… continue…