Online Game Development

A Dice Talent Community

Online Game Development Dice Talent Community

For people working on all aspects of Online Game Development, including genres, monetization, technical aspects like hosting, servers and clients, as well as programming. We’ll also get into characteristics of the industry, its growth, events, finances and, of course, creating games for Facebook.

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For over 70 years, Yoh has provided the talent needed for the jobs and projects critical to client success, by delivering comprehensive workforce solutions that focus on Aerospace and Defense, Engineering, Government, Health Care, Life Sciences, Information Technology and Telecommunications. As part of Yoh’s Information Technology division, the Interactive Entertainment group brings together the best in entertainment software resources and the experience of a national technology workforce solutions provider to provide responsive, quality talent for all aspects of game development and production.  Just as the industry brings the next generation of games and digital experiences to the market, Yoh is bringing years of workforce experience to the industry to provide the next generation of talent acquisition.  Visit our Interactive Entertainment Jobs page (http://bit.ly/11wgsoU), and discover all that’s possible with Yoh today!

The Latest from Dice

Do You Need a Degree to Work in Games?

Maya Character
Recently, the International Game Developers Association reported that 40 percent of the respondents to its Developer Satisfaction Survey hold an undergraduate college degree, while 20 percent have a graduate degree and 15 percent hold some kind of trade diploma. A little over half have taken supplemental training in game design in either high school or college. By the numbers, then, it would appear degrees count when it comes to building a career in games. But how much? Click here to… continue…

The Trials and Triumphs of Creating Your Own Game Studio

nevermind
Most parents probably don’t dream of their kids becoming video game developers, but it’s a real career—and potentially a lucrative one. Finding your way in the industry is tough, though. The video game business can be volatile, reacting quickly to changes in the economy or the success or failure of an individual game. As with more traditional industries, the steadiest course centers on acquiring a job at a large, established company. But more and more, aspiring developers are leaving big… continue…

Diversity’s Not So Hot in the Game Business, Either

EA SIMS Screen Shot
Young and hip as it may be, the world of game development is as white and male as the rest of tech, according to a report from the International Game Developers Association. The organization’s 2014 Developer Satisfaction Survey found that a full 79 percent of developers are white, followed by 8.2 percent Hispanic/Latino, 7.5 percent Asian and 2.5 percent black. The IDGA says this represents a slightly better diversity picture than was seen in 2005, when 83.3 percent of the… continue…

Booming Mobile Games Take Backseat at E3

DeNA Mobage Screen Shot
Amid the din of E3’s flashy console game demos, Re/code noted a quiet corner of the Los Angeles Convention Center: The mobile and social gaming pavilion. From the lack of crowds and unassuming placement at the game industry’s largest trade show, it’s hard to believe that mobile gaming is the business’s fastest growing segment and its largest source of digital revenue. Last year, Re/code says, smartphone and tablet games generated $3 billion in U.S. sales. And while sales of packaged… continue…

The Best of E3

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This week’s E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) saw the major game studios and console builders unveil their upcoming titles. None of the presentations were subtle, to put it mildly: Mainstream developers seem more determined than ever to pour years of work and tens of millions of dollars into games in which things explode, explode, and, just for variety, explode some more. If you squinted against the glare of all those pyrotechnics, however, you could see a few games attempting innovative stuff—whether… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

EA Tests Subscription Access To Game Catalog

posted 3 hours | from anonymous coward

business 24

An anonymous reader writes: Electronic Arts has announced a new program called "EA Access," a subscription-based service that will grant Xbox One users access to a small catalog of EA's popular games, as well as early trials of upcoming games. They're beta testing the service now, and the available games are FIFA 14, Madden NFL 25, Peggle 2, and Battlefield 4. (More titles will be added later.) They're charging $5 per month or $30 per year. It probably won't ever include their newest releases, but it's interesting to see such a major publisher experimenting with a Netflix-style subscription service.

$299 Android Gaming Tablet Reviewed

posted 4 hours | from vigile

hardware 55

Vigile (99919) writes "Last week NVIDIA announced the SHIELD Tablet and SHIELD Controller, and reviews are finally appearing this morning. Based on the high performance Tegra K1 SoC that integrates 192 Kepler architecture CUDA cores, benchmarks reveal that that the SHIELD Tablet is basically unmatched by any other mobile device on the market when it comes to graphics performance — it is more than 2.5x the performance of the Apple A7 in some instances. With that power NVIDIA is able to showcase full OpenGL versions of games like Portal and Half-Life 2 running at 1080p locally on the 19:12 display or output to a TV in a "console mode." PC Perspective has impressions of that experience as well as using the NVIDIA Game Stream technology to play your PC games on the SHIELD Tablet and controller. To go even further down the rabbit hole, you can stream your PC games from your desktop to your tablet, output them to the TV in console mode, stream your game play to Twitch from the tablet while overlaying your image through the front facing camera AND record your sessions locally via ShadowPlay and using the Wi-Fi Direct powered controller to send and receive audio. It is incredibly impressive hardware but the question remains as to whether or not there is, or will be, a market for Android-based gaming devices, even those with the power and performance that NVIDIA has built."

How Gygax Lost Control of TSR and D&D

posted 8 hours | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes "Sunday was the birthday of the late great Gary Gygax, co-creator of Dungeons & Dragons and Futurama guest star. With the fifth edition of D&D soon to come out at Gen Con this year, Jon Peterson, author of Playing at the World, has released a new piece to answer a historical question: how was it, back in 1985, that Gary was ousted from TSR and control of D&D was taken away from him? Drawn from board meeting minutes, stock certificates, letters, and other first-hand sources, it's not a quick read or a very cheery one, but it shows how the greatest success of hobby games of the 1980s fell apart and marginalized its most famous designer."

The Oculus Rift DK2: In-Depth Review (and Comparison To DK1)

posted 1 day | from benz145

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Benz145 (1869518) writes "The hotly anticipated Oculus Rift DK2 has begun arriving at doorsteps. The DK2s enhancements include optical positional tracking and a higher resolution panel, up from 1280×800 to 1920×1080 (1080p) and moved to a pentile-matrix OLED panel for display duties. This means higher levels of resolvable detail and a much reduced screen door effect. The panel features low persistence of vision, a technology pioneered by Valve that aims to cut motion artefacts by only displaying the latest, most correct display information relative to the user's movements – as users of the DK1 will attest, its LCD panel was heavily prone to smearing, things are now much improved with the DK2."

Day One With the Brand New Oculus Rift DK2: the Good, the Ugly and the Games

posted 3 days | from muterobert

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muterobert (2927951) writes Paul James goes hands on with one of the first next-gen Oculus Rifts in the wild: "After much hacking (and some kind developer linkage) I stepped into a DK2 enabled version of Technolust and lost myself utterly! The stunning attention to detail, neon on black really lets the OLED panel shine here. In fact, this experience was the closest I think I've ever some to presence in virtual reality thus far. Leaning in to check the myriad retro objects, gawking at the lighting and just generally being blown away by the experience. This game was fabulous on the DK1, it's utterly compelling now."

eSports Starting To Go Mainstream

posted 4 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: eSports have never been more popular, and many large companies are starting to view them in the same light as traditional sports. The amount of money being thrown around is beginning to rival the money exchanged over sports teams. A recent Dota 2 tournament handed out over $10 million in prizes, and Google's $1 billion purchase of game-streaming site Twitch.tv has now been confirmed. But it doesn't end there — companies like Coca-cola, Intel, Nissan, and major movie studios are looking at the audiences being drawn by eSports and realizing the advertising potential. "Last fall, Riot Games sold out the Staples Center for its League of Legends Championship Series Finals. While 12,000 people watched live in the home of the Lakers and Kings, over 32 million tuned in to the livestream." George Woo, head of a global eSports tournament, said, "Attendance to Intel Extreme Masters events has grown 10X with us filling up sport stadiums, where we have visitors lining up to get a seat to watch the competition. Online it has grown 100X, where we now get more viewers watching livestreams for a single event than we'd have tune in for an entire season in the past."

ScummVM 1.7.0 Released

posted 5 days | from jones_supa

emulation 26

jones_supa (887896) writes It's been a while since a new ScummVM release, but version 1.7.0 is now here with many exciting features. New games supported are The Neverhood, Mortville Manor, Voyeur, Return to Ringworld and Chivalry is Not Dead. The Roland MT-32 emulator has been updated, there is an OpenGL backend, the GUI has seen improvements, AGOS engine is enhanced, tons of SCI bug fixes have been applied, and various other improvements can be found. This version also introduces support for the OUYA gaming console and brings improvements to some other more exotic platforms. Please read the release notes for an accurate description of the new version. SCUMM being the language/interpreter used by many classic adventure games.

GOG.com Announces Linux Support

posted 5 days | from soulskill

games 81

For years, Good Old Games has made a business out of selling classic PC game titles completely free of DRM. Today they announced that their platform now supports Linux. They said, We've put much time and effort into this project and now we've found ourselves with over 50 titles, classic and new, prepared for distribution, site infrastructure ready, support team trained and standing by ... We're still aiming to have at least 100 Linux games in the coming months, but we've decided not to delay the launch just for the sake of having a nice-looking number to show off to the press. ... Note that we've got many classic titles coming officially to Linux for the very first time, thanks to the custom builds prepared by our dedicated team of penguin tamers. ... For both native Linux versions, as well as special builds prepared by our team, GOG.com will provide distro-independent tar.gz archives and support convenient DEB installers for the two most popular Linux distributions: Ubuntu and Mint, in their current and future LTS editions.

Raspberry Pi Gameboy

posted 6 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: An enterprising hacker took on a project to rebuild a broken Gameboy using emulation software, a Raspberry Pi, and a few other easily-obtainable parts. The result: success! The hacker has posted a detailed walkthrough explaining all of the challenges and how they were solved. "Using a Dremel, I cut out a most of the battery compartment as well as some posts that on the case for the LCD that would no longer be needed. Doing so, the Pi sits flush with the back of the DMG case. ... The screen was the first challenge. The screen runs off 12V out of the box which wouldn't work with the USB battery pack. The USB battery pack is rated at 5V, 1000mAH so the goal was go modify the screen to allow it to run at 5V. ... I finally got it to work by removing the power converter chip as well as soldering a jumper between the + power in and the resister on the top right."