Online Game Development

A Dice Talent Community

Online Game Development Dice Talent Community

For people working on all aspects of Online Game Development, including genres, monetization, technical aspects like hosting, servers and clients, as well as programming. We’ll also get into characteristics of the industry, its growth, events, finances and, of course, creating games for Facebook.

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The Latest From Dice

For Game Developers, It’s About the Labor of Love

Goat Simulator
More people are playing video games than ever before—so many that we now have debates over who counts as a “gamer.” Is someone with a smartphone and an addiction to Candy Crush or Angry Birds a gamer, or should that title be reserved for those who play the more immersive and complex games generally available only on PCs and consoles? The best answer to this question might be, “Who cares?” For most purposes, there’s no need to differentiate between types… continue…

Adult Women Outnumber Teenage Boys Among Gamers

Assassin's Creed
More adult women play video games than boys 18 or younger, according to a new study by the Entertainment Software Association (PDF). That might come as a surprise to casual followers of the video-game industry, which relies on games seemingly tailor-made for teenage boys to fuel its burgeoning bottom line. Not only do women constitute 48 percent of everybody tapping away at a game controller, but the number of female gamers aged 50 and over jumped 32 percent between 2012… continue…

Valve Is the Favorite Employer Among Game Developers

Half-Life
Game developers would rather work for Valve than run their own studio, according to a survey by the International Game Developers Association. There’s good reason the company behind Half-Life and the game platform Steam is so popular, says GameSpot. Among other things, it has an informal hierarchy (people “don’t have bosses”), an open vacation policy and strongly encourages collaboration. Valve’s also a private company, meaning it doesn’t face the same kind of investor pressure that companies like Electronic Arts do.… continue…

How Game Developers Turn Kickstarter Failure Into Success

Telepath Tactics
When you ask random strangers on the Internet to give you money, there are no guarantees. That’s true in almost any scenario, including when video game developers use Kickstarter to crowdfund the creation of a game. While 3,900 or so games have been funded on Kickstarter, more than 7,200 game projects failed to hit their goal. Within those two numbers are some people who fall into both categories: developers who failed to get funding on their first try, but re-launched… continue…

SourceForge Interview: A New Game Engine

VASSAL Map
Over at SourceForge, the August Project of the Month is the community-elected VASSAL Engine, described as “a game engine for building and playing online adaptations of board and card games.” Project manager Joel Uckelman sat down to talk about the project’s origins and future. (Editor’s Note: Here’s the link to the project. Hello, Hacker News folks!) Tell me about the VASSAL Engine project. VASSAL provides a virtual tabletop for playing board games live over the net and by email. It’s cross-platform… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Alienware's Triangular Area-51 Re-Design With Tri-SLI GeForce GTX 980, Tested

posted 2 days | from mojokid

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MojoKid writes Dell's Alienware division recently released a radical redesign of their Area-51 gaming desktop. With 45-degree angled front and rear face plates that are designed to direct control and IO up toward the user, in addition to better directing cool airflow in, while warm airflow is directed up and away from the rear of the chassis, this triangular-shaped machine grabs your attention right away. In testing and benchmarks, the Area-51's new design enables top-end performance with thermal and acoustic profiles that are fairly impressive versus most high-end gaming PC systems. The chassis design is also pretty clean, modular and easily servicable. Base system pricing isn't too bad, starting at $1699 with the ability to dial things way up to an 8-core Haswell-E chip and triple GPU graphics from NVIDIA and AMD. The test system reviewed at HotHardware was powered by a six-core Core i7-5930K chip and three GeForce GTX 980 cards in SLI. As expected, it ripped through the benchmarks, though the price as configured and tested is significantly higher.

Quake Meets Minecraft in FPS Construction Kit Gunscape

posted 2 days | from slappingoysters

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SlappingOysters writes: One of the highlighted games at the PAX AUS expo starting on October 31 is Blowfish Studios' Gunscape, a game described as an FPS construction kit. As well as building and sharing FPS maps for multiplayer gaming sessions across eight different modes, the game will also be able to handle up to nine-player splitscreen on a 4K display. This includes co-op map building.

Tetris Is Hard To Test

posted 5 days | from jackdw

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New submitter JackDW writes: Tetris is one of the best-known computer games ever made. It's easy to play but hard to master, and it's based on a NP-hard problem. But that's not all that's difficult about it. Though it's simple enough to be implemented in one line of BBC BASIC, it's complex enough to be really hard to thoroughly test.

It may seem like you can test everything in Tetris just by playing it for a few minutes, but this is very unlikely! As I explain in this article, the game is filled with special cases that rarely occur in normal play, and these can only be easily found with the help of a coverage tool.

Google Search Finally Adds Information About Video Games

posted 5 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes Google has expanded its search engine with the capability to recognize video games. If your query references a game, a new Knowledge Graph panel on the right-hand side of Google's search results page will offer more information, including the series it belongs to, initial release date, supported platforms, developers, publishers, designers, and even review scores. Google spokesperson: "With today's update, you can ask questions about video games, and (while there will be ones we don't cover) you'll get answers for console and PC games as well as the most popular mobile apps."

PCGamingWiki Looks Into Linux Gaming With 'Port Reports'

posted 6 days | from aberbeta

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AberBeta writes: PCGamingWiki contributor Soeb has been looking into the recent larger budget game releases to appear on Linux, including XCOM: Enemy Unknown and Borderlands: The Pre–Sequel produced by Mac porting houses Feral and Aspyr. Soeb reports that while feature parity is high, performance could be a bit better. Performance differences aside, the games are finally arriving on Linux — now the userbase needs to expand to make a virtuous cycle.

Judge Says EA Battlefield 4 Execs Engaged In "Puffery," Not Fraud

posted 1 week | from demononice

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DemonOnIce writes with a story, as reported by Ars Technica, that a federal judge in San Francisco has dismissed a proposed securities fraud class action lawsuit connected to Battlefield 4's bungled rollout. From the report: EA and several top executives were sued in December and were accused of duping investors with their public statements and concealing issues with the first-person shooter game. The suit claimed executives were painting too rosy of a picture surrounding what ultimately would be Battlefield 4's disastrous debut on various gaming consoles beginning last October, including the next-generation Xbox One. But US District Judge Susan Illston of San Francisco said their comments about EA and the first-person shooter game were essentially protected corporate speak. "The Court agrees with defendants that all of the purported misstatements are inactionable statements of opinion, corporate optimism, or puffery," Illston ruled Monday.

Doctor Who To Teach Kids To Code

posted 1 week | from dcfc

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DCFC writes: The BBC is releasing a game to help 8- to 11-year-old kids get into coding. Based on Doctor Who, it alternates between a standard platform game and programming puzzles that introduce the ideas of sequence, loops, if..then, variables and a touch of event-driven programming. Kids will get to program a Dalek to make him more powerful. (Apparently the BBC thinks upgrading psychopathic, racist death machines is a good idea!)

New Music Discovered In Donkey Kong For Arcade

posted 2 weeks | from furrykef .

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First time accepted submitter furrykef . writes Over 33 years have passed since Donkey Kong first hit arcades, but it still has new surprises. I was poking through the game in a debugger when I discovered that the game contains unused music and voice clips. One of the tunes would have been played when you rescued Pauline, and two others are suggestive of deleted cutscenes. In addition, Pauline was originally meant to speak. In one clip she says something unintelligible, but it may be "Hey!", "Nice!", or "Thanks!". The other is clearly a cry for help.

For Game Developers, It's About the Labor of Love

posted 2 weeks | from nerval's lobster

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Nerval's Lobster writes With "GamerGate" and all the debates over who counts as a "gamer," it's easy to forget that games are created by people with a genuine love of the craft. Journalist Jon Brodkin sat down with Armin Ibrisagic, game designer & PR manager for Coffee Stain Studios, the Swedish studio that made Goat Simulator, to talk about why they built that game and how it turned into such a success. Brodkin also talked to Leszek Lisowski, founder of Wastelands Interactive, about the same topic. While these developers might debate with themselves (and others) over whether to develop games for hardcore gamers, or jump on the mobile "casual gaming" bandwagon, they'll ultimately in it because they love games — a small but crucial detail that seems too easy to forget these days.

Mozilla Teams Up With Humble Bundle To Offer Eight Plugin-Free Games

posted 2 weeks | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes Mozilla and Humble Bundle announced a new package that features award-winning indie best-sellers for which gamers can choose how much they want to pay. Naturally called the Humble Mozilla Bundle, the package consists of eight games that have been ported to the Web. The first five games (Super Hexagon, AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! for the Awesome, Osmos, Zen Bound 2, and Dustforce DX) can cost you whatever you want. The next two (Voxatron and FTL: Faster Than Light) can be had if you beat the average price for the bundle. You can pay $8 or more to receive all of the above, plus the last game, Democracy 3. Previously, all of these indie games were available only on PC or mobile. Now they all work in browsers on Windows, Mac, and Linux without having to install any plugins.