Mobile Development Industry

A Dice Talent Community

Are you confining your job search to a few major players in the mobile development market?

I’m happy to report that mobile applications are popping up in some of the most interesting places. Mobile apps alongside a website are pretty popular right now. Using “fishing” as a search term in the Android market, I turned up a few hundred applications, both free and paid.

Why look at “fishing”? Because tons of companies are funding and building cool applications, all over the place.

Take “Fishing Status” from Hatteras Tech for example.

The program is basically a front-end Android app that connects you to all kinds of fishing information. The interface is organized into tabs and various icons. Tabs include reports, weather, location, and tackle. Corresponding icons under each link connect to Web pages, using the browser. You might have local reports, predictions, and events under the reports tab. You’ll find tides, local weather, buoys, and SST charts (whatever those are) under the weather tab. The free version has a link at the bottom to update to the pro version. They also have a website for people who want to access the information using a standard notebook browser.

The site is pretty well constructed and effective, so I’d say they probably had some professional help setting it up. The mobile application is equally well built and useful.

For ambitious mobile developers, there are probably hundreds or thousands of companies out there with a website in need of a companion mobile app. Granted, a company could probably get by with just a Web version when it comes to serving users with tablets or notebooks. Mobile users, like an angler, need something that runs on their smartphone, anywhere. With a little imagination, it’s easy to start looking outside traditional IT haunts, for mobile development inspiration.

If you’re a team sports fanatic, why not put your passion into designing mobile apps? Here are a few stats, on the number of applications, I found in the Android market.

NFL 2,159
NBA 1,868
Major League Baseball 1,055
Nascar 807
Golf 2626

So, there you have it, literally thousands of applications that can be expanded or supported. Somebody has to program and maintain those smartphone apps and Web pages. It might as well be you.

Do you have an unusual mobile development gig going? Tell everybody about it in the comments.

Click here to return to the Mobile Development community.

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