Mobile Development

A Dice Talent Community

Mobile Development Talent Community

News and advice for development on mobile platforms, including Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Windows and other platforms. Includes information regarding operating sytems, training, and distribution of applications.

Android | iOS | Mobile Development Industry

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The Latest From Dice

Five Alternatives for Developing Native iOS Apps

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The simplest way to join the ranks of iOS developers is to learn Objective-C and/or Swift (the latter, while not quite ready for prime-time upon release, has gotten a lot better with its recent v1.2 update). But for everybody who doesn’t want to go down that route, there are other ways to create native iOS apps. Whatever way you choose, remember: If you wish to actually deploy apps to iPhones and iPads—and list them for sale in Apple’s App Store—you… continue…

Apple iOS Devs Rejoice: App Size Limit Doubles

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Apple iOS developers of the world, rejoice: the size limit for your apps has doubled, from 2GB to 4GB. According to Apple’s Developer website, “this change does not affect the cellular network delivery size limit of 100MB.” But for anyone whose apps were perilously close to the 2GB limit, you can now increase your app’s content without worrying about bumping into that previous ceiling. Check out the latest iOS-related jobs. This increase was inevitable, given the growing sophistication and size of… continue…

Google Android, iOS, and… Ubuntu?

Canonical Ubuntu Smartphones
In January 2013, Canonical (a company that works with the open source community on Ubuntu, a free operating system) announced that it would build a version of Ubuntu for smartphones. A few months later, it unveiled a crowdfunding campaign to build an Ubuntu-powered smartphone, which attracted $12 million in donations—a solid number, but far short of what the project needed to achieve liftoff. In the wake of that failure, it seemed the quest for an Ubuntu smartphone was all but… continue…

For Mobile Apps, 2014 Was a Very Good Year

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App Annie has posted a helpful retrospective of the mobile-app ecosystem in 2014, and some of the data points are interesting. For starters, Google Play outpaced Apple’s App Store in terms of total downloads, although Apple remained well ahead with regard to total revenue generated by mobile apps. Check out the latest app-developer jobs. Second, multiple categories of apps enjoyed explosive growth, with messaging apps (WhatsApp, etc.), mobile video, travel and transportation apps leading that charge. “Super casual gaming,” as… continue…

In the Mobile App Market, Few Get Mega-Rich

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Apple paid out $10 billion to third-party developers last year, industry analyst Horace Dediu wrote in a much-circulated blog posting this month. Combined with Apple’s cut of developer revenues, that’s more than Hollywood earned from the U.S. box office in 2014 (according to Dediu). Whatever the comparison, it’s clear that the app market is huge, and rapidly growing as the years pass. But as Charles Perry pointed out on the corporate blog of app-builder Metakite Software, those developer revenues aren’t… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Alibaba Looks To Rural China To Popularize Its Mobile OS

posted 12 mins | from itwbennett

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itwbennett writes: E-commerce giant Alibaba Group hasn't given up on its YunOS mobile operating system, and is taking the software to China's rural markets through a series of low-cost phones, which will be built by lesser-known Chinese brands and will range from 299 yuan ($49) to 699 yuan. Slashdot readers may remember that in 2012, Google claimed it was a variant of its Android OS, sparking a clash that threatened to derail Alibaba's effort to popularize the mobile OS.

Has the Native Vs. HTML5 Mobile Debate Changed?

posted 5 hours | from itwbennett

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itwbennett writes: The tools available to developers who need to build an application once and deploy everywhere have exploded. Frameworks like famo.us, Ionic, PhoneGap, Sencha Touch, Appcelerator, Xamarin, and others are reducing the grunt work and improving the overall quality of web based mobile applications dramatically. The benefits of a build once, deploy everywhere platform are pretty obvious, but are they enough to make up for the hits to user experience?

Google Officially Discontinues Nexus 7 Tablet

posted 9 hours | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Google's 7-inch tablet has disappeared from the Google Store, where a note in red type simply states that the device is no longer available for purchase. "The Nexus 7 was first released back in 2013, so it's fair to say it had a good run. The Android-based tablet received great reviews, but what really made it a long-term success was the fact that it was affordable and continually received updates from Google. Manufactured by Asus, the Nexus 7 was even treated to Android Lollipop, the latest version of the operating system, although not with bug-free results. The discontinuation shouldn't come as a big surprise, however, as Google pulled a similar move back in March with the Nexus 5 smartphone, not to mention the Nexus 9 tablet's release last fall."

Ask Slashdot: What Are the Most Stable Smartphones These Days?

posted 2 days | from janimal

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janimal writes: The iPhone used to be the smartphone that "just works." Ever since the 4S days, this has been true less and less with each generation. My wife's iPhone 6 needs to be restarted several times per week for things like internet search or making calls to work. An older 5S I'm using also doesn't consistently stream to Apple TV, doesn't display song names correctly on Apple TV and third party peripherals. In short, as features increase, the iPhone's stability is decreasing. In your opinion, which smartphone brand these days is taking up the slack and delivering a fully featured smartphone that "just works"?

Turning a Smartphone Display Into a Biometric Scanner

posted 2 days | from jan_jes

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New submitter jan_jes writes: Recent mobile phones integrate fingerprint scanners to authenticate users biometrically and replace passwords, making authentication more convenient. Researchers at Yahoo Labs have created a new technology called "Bodyprint," which turns your smartphone's touchscreen display into a biometric scanner. It allows the touch sensor to scan users' body parts (PDF) such as ears, fingers, fists, and palms by pressing them against the display. Bodyprint implements the four-eye principle for locking sensitive documents — accessing the document can require the presence of two or more people involved with the project. Another application is authenticating a user to answer a call by scanning their ear pressed against the phone.

Patents Show Google Fi Was Envisioned Before the iPhone Was Released

posted 3 days | from smaxp

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smaxp writes: Contrary to reports, Google didn't become a mobile carrier with the introduction of Google Fi. Google Fi was launched to prove that a network-of-networks serves smartphone users better than a single mobile carrier's network. Patents related to Google Fi, filed in early 2007, explain Google's vision – smartphones negotiate for and connect to the fastest network available. The patent and Google Fi share a common notion that the smartphone should connect to the fastest network available, not a single carrier's network that may not provide the best performance. It breaks the exclusive relationship between a smartphone and a single carrier. Meanwhile, a story at BostInno points out that Google's not the only one with a network-hopping hybrid approach to phone calls.

iOS WiFi Bug Allows Remote Reboot of All Devices In Area

posted 4 days | from bronscon

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New submitter BronsCon writes: A recently disclosed flaw in iOS 8 dubbed "No iOS Zone" allows an attacker to create a WiFi hot spot that will cause iOS devices to become unstable, crash, and reboot, even when in offline mode. Adi Sharabani and Yair Amit of Skycure are working with Apple for a fix; but, for now, the only workaround is to simply not be in range of such a malicious network.

Traffic App Waze To Alert L.A. Drivers of Kidnappings and Hit-and-Runs

posted 4 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Traffic-alert app Waze has announced a partnership with Los Angeles to share information on hit-and-runs and kidnappings taking place across the city, alongside traffic data and road closure updates. The deal forms part of a data-sharing agreement between L.A. authorities and the Google-owned tech startup detailed yesterday by the city's mayor Eric Garcetti. He assured that the data provided to the city by Waze would be "aggregated" and completely anonymous. According to the councillor the collaboration was mutually confirmed on Monday following a "very good meeting" between Waze and LAPD chief officer Charlie Beck. This move signals a considerable turn of events after Beck argued at the end of last year that the traffic alert app posed a danger to police due to its ability to track their location. The complaint followed the shooting of two police officers in New York after the shooter used the app to track his targets.

Wellness App Author Lied About Cancer Diagnosis

posted 4 days | from freshly exhumed

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Freshly Exhumed writes: Wellness advocate Belle Gibson, who translated her high profile as a cancer survivor into publishing success, has admitted her cancer diagnosis was not real. Ms Gibson, 23, who claimed to have healed terminal brain cancer by eating wholefoods, made the admission in an interview with the Australian Women's Weekly. The success of Gibson's book, The Whole Pantry, and her smartphone application, which advocates natural therapies, has been largely dependent on her high-profile as a cancer survivor. Sadly, we've seen this sort of behaviour before. It would seem that Belle Gibson has emulated Dr. Andrew Wakefield in knowingly decieving the public in ways that could possibly be dangerous to the health of believers.

Facebook's "Hello" Tells You Who's Calling Before You Pick Up

posted 5 days | from mark wilson

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Mark Wilson writes: When you receive a call you'll usually see the number of the caller, but this may not be helpful in identifying them before you decide whether to pick up. Facebook's answer to this problem is Hello. This new app comes from the Facebook Messenger team and aims to tell you more about the person getting in touch with you even if you don't have their number saved in your address book. Currently available for Android, the dialer app also allows for the blocking of calls from individuals.