Mobile Development

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Mobile Development Talent Community

News and advice for development on mobile platforms, including Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Windows and other platforms. Includes information regarding operating sytems, training, and distribution of applications. Android | iOS | Mobile Development Industry Following this community adds its articles and discussions to My Tech Feed.

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Anything but Business as Usual

Capital One began as an information strategy company that specialized in credit cards, and we’ve become one of the most impactful players in the industry. We’re recruiting talented software engineers and mobile product managers who can envision next-generation mobile innovations that will deliver a rich, engaging, and unmatched customer experience. Are you ready to join?

The Latest From Dice

Do Mobile App Developers Need a Lawyer?

Apple Watch
Activity trackers, “smartwatches,” wearable electronics, and smartphones all come with more than the ability to record your daily steps taken or calories burned; the devices’ ability to record the nuances of daily activity—thanks in large part to a growing collection of third-party apps—has subjected them to quite a bit of privacy-related scrutiny. In a recent study, the Federal Trade Commission found 12 mobile health and fitness apps sending users’ personal information to 76 different third parties. Another study of the… continue…

Building Apps in Swift: Using Storyboards

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In our previous article on building apps with Apple’s Swift, we demonstrated how to use view controllers and views in code to craft a simple app. Before we begin with this next lesson, using storyboards to build an app in Swift, it’s worth revisiting that first piece. (The code that accompanies the piece is stored on SourceForge as “First Example.zip.”) Remember that view controllers in Swift manage two roles: they controls views on a page or part of a page,… continue…

iOS 8 Release Day: What You Need to Know

Apple iOS 8
It’s September, which means it’s time for Apple to release the latest version of its mobile operating system. If everything goes according to plan, everybody who owns an iPhone, iPod or iPad (or at least certain generations of those devices) will have the ability to download iOS 8 for free once it becomes available Sept. 17. In reality, the crush of people attempting to download the software will almost certainly lead to delays, device crashes, angry Tweets and Facebook postings,… continue…

Apple Watch: Worth Your Development Hours?

Apple Sport Watch
Although Apple revealed quite a bit about its new timepiece at yesterday’s keynote event, it didn’t offer much detail about the device’s developer SDK. Click here to find Apple-related jobs. But as the Apple Watch heads for release sometime in 2015, the role of developers in the device’s ecosystem will only increase in importance. Developers who take the plunge into smart watches will face some key challenges: Screen Size: The Apple Watch, along with rivals such as the new Moto… continue…

Business-App Developers: Pay Attention to Oculus Rift

Oculus Rift
Those who know about Oculus VR, maker of the Oculus Rift virtual-reality headset, assume that the company (along with third-party developers) will devote the bulk of its time and attention to gaming. After all, the firm boasts legendary game developer John Carmack as its CTO, and every video it produces seems to focus on the device’s ability to deliver an immersive gaming experience. With Oculus’s reputation on the rise (thanks in large part to its acquisition by Facebook), other companies… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Boeing Told To Replace Cockpit Screens Affected By Wi-Fi

posted 10 hours | from rambo tribble

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Rambo Tribble writes The Federal Aviation Administration has ordered Boeing to replace Honeywell-built cockpit screens that could be affected by wi-fi transmissions. Additionally, the FAA has expressed concerns that other frequencies, such as used by air surveillance and weather radar, could disrupt the displays. The systems involved report airspeed, altitude, heading and pitch and roll to the crew, and the agency stated that a failure could cause a crash. Meanwhile, the order is said to affect over 1,300 aircraft, and some airlines are balking, since the problem has never been seen in operation, that the order presents "a high, and unnecessary, financial burden on operators".

Linux Foundation Announces Major Network Functions Virtualization Project

posted 1 day | from andy updegrove

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Andy Updegrove writes: The Linux Foundation this morning announced the latest addition to its family of major hosted open source initiatives: the Open Platform for NFV Project (OPNFV). Its mission is to develop and maintain a carrier-grade, integrated, open source reference platform for the telecom industry. Importantly, the thirty-eight founding members include not only cloud and service infrastructure vendors, but telecom service providers, developers and end users as well. The announcement of OPNFV highlights three of the most significant trends in IT: virtualization (the NFV part of the name refers to network function virtualization), moving software and services to the cloud, and collaboratively developing complex open source platforms in order to accelerate deployment of new business models while enabling interoperability across a wide range of products and services. The project is also significant for reflecting a growing recognition that open source projects need to incorporate open standards planning into their work programs from the beginning, rather than as an afterthought.

HP Introduces Sub-$100 Windows Tablet

posted 2 days | from jfruh

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jfruh writes While Windows-based tablets haven't exactly set the world on fire, Microsoft hasn't given up on them, and its hardware partners haven't either. HP has announced a series of Windows tablets, with the 7-inch low-end model, the Stream 7, priced at $99. The Stream brand is also being used for low-priced laptops intended to compete with Chromebooks (which HP also sells). All are running Intel chips and full Windows, not Windows RT.

LTE Upgrade Will Let Phones Connect To Nearby Devices Without Towers

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader sends this excerpt from MIT's Technology Review: A new feature being added to the LTE protocol that smartphones use to communicate with cellular towers will make it possible to bypass those towers altogether. Phones will be able to "talk" directly to other mobile devices and to beacons located in shops and other businesses. Known as LTE Direct, the wireless technology has a range of up to 500 meters, far more than either Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. It is included in update to the LTE standard slated for approval this year, and devices capable of LTE Direct could appear as soon as late 2015. ... Researchers are, for example, testing LTE Direct as a way to allow smartphones to automatically discover nearby people, businesses, and other information.

Court Rules Nokia Must Pay Damages To Buyers of Faulty Phones In Mexico

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes Nokia must pay damages to consumers in Mexico who reported malfunctioning handsets, following a court ruling for a trial that has lasted four years. The case was brought to court by Mexican watchdog Profeco in 2010, before the Finnish manufacturer was acquired by Microsoft – that deal was only completed earlier this year. Profeco added that the court has ordered Nokia to either replace the faulty handsets and/or reimburse their cost. On top of that, Nokia must also pay compensation totaling at least 20 percent of the damages resulting from malfunctioning. Customers that had been affected by faulty Nokia equipment would be able to seek damages even if they had not yet presented complaints.

Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

posted 2 days | from schwit1

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schwit1 writes Google is looking to exert more pressure on device OEMs that wish to continue using the Android mobile operating system. Among the new requirements for many partners: increasing the number of Google apps that must be pre-installed on the device to as many as 20, placing more Google apps on the home screen or in a prominent icon folder and making Google Search more prominent. Earlier this year, Google laid its vision to reduce fragmentation by forcing OEMs to ship new devices with more recent version of Android. Those OEMs that choose not to comply lose access to Google Mobile Services (GMS) apps like Gmail, Google Play, and YouTube.

When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone

posted 4 days | from soulskill

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The Atlantic is running an article about how "smart" devices are starting to see everyday use in many people's home. The authors say this will fundamentally change the concept of what it means to own and control your possessions. Using smartphones as an example, they extrapolate this out to a future where many household items are dependent on software. Quoting: These phones come with all kinds of restrictions on their possible physical capabilities. You may not take them apart. Depending on the plan, not all software can be downloaded onto them, not every device can be tethered to them, and not every cell phone network can be tapped. "Owning" a phone is much more complex than owning a plunger. And if the big tech players building the wearable future, the Internet of things, self-driving cars, and anything else that links physical stuff to the network get their way, our relationship to ownership is about to undergo a wild transformation. They also suggest that planned obsolescence will become much more common. For example, take watches: a quality dumbwatch can last decades, but a smartwatch will be obsolete in a few years.

Ubuntu Touch For Phones Hits RTM, First Phones Coming This Year

posted 4 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: In early 2013, Canonical showed the world Ubuntu Touch, a version of Ubuntu developed specifically for smartphones. Now, the mobile operating system has finally reached "release to manufacturing" status. (Here's the release announcement.) The first phone running Ubuntu Touch, the Meizu MX4, will start shipping in December. "Details are scarce on its hardware, but a leak from iGeek suggests the Pro variant may have a Samsung Exynos 5430 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 2560x1536 resolution screen. ... This more powerful hardware is good news if true, and it bodes well for Ubuntu's vision of computing convergence." Softpedia has a preview of the RTM version of the OS. They say performance has improved significantly, even on old phones, and that the UI has been polished into a much better state.

Consumer Reports: New iPhones Not As Bendy As Believed

posted 5 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Over the past several days, we've been hearing reports about some amount of users noticing that their brand new iPhone 6 Plus is bending in their pockets. The pictures and videos shown so far have kicked off an investigation, and Consumer Reports has done one of the more scientific tests so far. They found that the iPhone 6 Plus takes 90 pounds of pressure before it permanently deforms. The normal iPhone 6 took even less: 70 lbs. They tested other phones as well: HTC One (M8): 70 lbs, LG G3: 130 lbs, iPhone 5: 130 lbs, Samsung Galaxy Note 3: 150 lbs. The Verge also did a report on how Apple torture-tests its devices before shipping them. Apple's standard is about 55 lbs of pressure, though it does so thousands of times before looking for bends. One analysis suggests that Apple's testing procedure only puts pressure on the middle of the phone, which doesn't sufficiently evaluate the weakened area where holes have been created for volume buttons. Consumer Reports' test presses on the middle of the device as well.