Mobile Development

A Dice Talent Community

Mobile Development Talent Community

News and advice for development on mobile platforms, including Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Windows and other platforms. Includes information regarding operating sytems, training, and distribution of applications.

Android | iOS | Mobile Development Industry

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Anything but Business as Usual

Capital One began as an information strategy company that specialized in credit cards, and we’ve become one of the most impactful players in the industry. We’re recruiting talented software engineers and mobile product managers who can envision next-generation mobile innovations that will deliver a rich, engaging, and unmatched customer experience. Are you ready to join?

The Latest from Dice

Check Out the Dice Job Search App 2.0

Dice Job Search App
Dice has released an updated version of the Dice Job Search App, loaded with nifty new features. The app, available for iOS devices, allows users to browse, share, and apply for thousands of open tech-pro jobs. New features include the ability to create a Dice account from within the app, add a resume to an account from your mobile device, and preview resumes and cover letters while on the go. Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume.… continue…

Amazon’s Fire Phone Might Be a Flop

Amazon Fire Phone
In June, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduced the Fire Phone, the online retailer’s first smartphone. Unlike Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets, which compete at the low end of the touch-screen market, the Fire Phone is a premium device, built and priced to challenge Apple’s iPhone and the Samsung Galaxy line. It runs Fire OS 3.5.0, an operating system built atop Google Android, and features apps such as Firefly, which detects objects in the environment and tells you whether they’re for sale… continue…

‘Swing Copters’ and the Danger of App Copycats

Screen Shot 2014-08-22 at 10.43.55 AM
Game developer Dong Nguyen has launched Swing Copters, a follow-up to his blockbuster Flappy Bird. Within a day of Copters hitting the iOS and Android app stores, rival developers released what seemed like dozens of clones, many of which made only the slightest alterations to Nguyen’s game—an altered color here, or a slightly different design there. Click here to find game development jobs. The same thing happened with Flappy Bird once that game became a raging success, and developers realized… continue…

Uber Opens Its API. But Will People Build With It?

Uber Logo
In the five years since its creation, Uber has grown to an $18.2 billion company that threatens to subvert the traditional taxi industry in many cities around the world. Uber’s popularity stems largely from its ease of use—with a few taps of a mobile app, anyone can order a car-for-hire to his or her location. Like many a tech company, Uber needs to grow by a healthy percentage every quarter in order to satisfy its investors and fend off competition.… continue…

Has Your Company Mastered Apps?

App Masters
Smartphones and tablets are now ubiquitous among companies, along with customized apps that monitor everything from customer service to shipping logistics. Despite that ubiquity, a new report from the Apigee Institute (PDF) insists that enterprise IT is broken, and that the majority of your average C-suite is unable to keep up with the technological changes sweeping pretty much every industry. At the heart of that brokenness, the report adds, is the inability of current data-storage practices and systems to keep… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Wi-Fi Router Attack Only Requires a Single PIN Guess

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: New research shows that wireless routers are still quite vulnerable to attack if they don't use a good implementation of Wi-Fi Protected Setup. Bad implementations do a poor job of randomizing the key used to authenticate hardware PINs. Because of this, the new attack only requires a single guess at the hardware PIN to collect data necessary to break it. After a few hours to process the data, an attacker can access the router's WPS functionality. Two major router manufacturers are affected: Broadcom, and a manufacturer to be named once they get around to fixing it. "Because many router manufacturers use the reference software implementation as the basis for their customized router software, the problems affected the final products, Bongard said. Broadcom's reference implementation had poor randomization, while the second vendor used a special seed, or nonce, of zero, essentially eliminating any randomness."

Ask Slashdot: Best Phone Apps?

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: The phone app ecosystem has matured nicely over the past several years. There are apps for just about everything I need to do on my phone. But I've noticed that once an app fills a particular need, I don't tend to look for newer or potentially better apps that would replace it. In a lot of areas, I'm two or three years out of date — maybe there's something better, maybe not. Since few people relish the thought of installing, testing, and uninstalling literally hundreds of apps, I thought I'd put the question to the Slashdot community: what interesting, useful new(ish) apps are you aware of? This can be anything from incredibly slick, well-designed single purpose apps to powerful multi-function apps to entertainment-oriented apps.

Judge Lucy Koh Rejects Apple's Quest For Anti-Samsung Injunction

posted 4 days | from feedfeeder

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The Associated Press, in a story carried by The Financial Express, reports that Federal Judge Lucy Koh has has rejected Apple's attempt to block the sale of several older Samsung smartphones that copied features in the iPhone. Wednesday's rebuff comes nearly four months after a jury awarded Apple Inc. $119 million in damages for Samsung's infringements on technology used in the trend-setting iPhone. The amount was well below the $2.2 billion in damages that Apple had been seeking in the latest round of legal wrangling between the world's two leading smartphone makers since the tussle began four years ago. The Register also carries the story, and notes Perhaps because the ongoing battle was turning the two companies into law firms rather than tech titans, the two agreed to abandon all patent lawsuits outside the USA earlier this month. However, Apple still wanted the infringing features extirpated from American stores, and was seeking to have phones nobody bought banned as ammo for future battles.

$33 Firefox Phone Launched In India

posted 5 days | from davidshenba

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davidshenba writes Intex and Mozilla have launched Cloud FX, a smartphone powered by Mozilla's Firefox OS. The phone has a 1 GHz processor, 2 Megapixel camera, dual SIM, 3.5 inch capacitive touchscreen. Though the phone has limited features, initial reviews say that the build quality is good for the price range. With a price tag of $33 (2000 INR), and local languages support the new Firefox phone is hitting the Indian market of nearly 1 billion mobile users.

California Passes Law Mandating Smartphone Kill Switch

posted 7 days | from alphadogg

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alphadogg (971356) writes "Smartphones sold in California will soon be required to have a kill switch that lets users remotely lock them and wipe them of data in the event they are lost or stolen. The demand is the result of a new law, put into effect on Monday, that applies to phones manufactured after July 1, 2015, and sold in the state. While its legal reach does not extend beyond the state's borders, the inefficiency of producing phones solely for California means the kill switch is expected to be adopted by phone makers on handsets sold across the U.S. and around the world."

Google Announces a New Processor For Project Ara

posted 1 week | from rtoz

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rtoz writes Google has just announced a new processor for Project Ara. The mobile Rockchip SoC will function as an applications processor, without requiring a bridge chip. A prototype of the phone with the Rockchip CPU, will be available early next year. Via Google+ post, Project Ara team Head Paul Eremenko says "We view this Rockchip processor as a trailblazer for our vision of a modular architecture where the processor is a node on a network with a single, universal interface -- free from also serving as the network hub for all of the mobile device's peripherals." (Project Ara is Google's effort to create an extensible, modular cellphone; last month we mentioned a custom version of Linux being developed for the project, too.)

Smartphone Kill Switch, Consumer Boon Or Way For Government To Brick Your Phone?

posted 2 weeks | from mojokid

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MojoKid writes We're often told that having a kill switch in our mobile devices — mostly our smartphones — is a good thing. At a basic level, that's hard to disagree with. If every mobile device had a built-in kill switch, theft would go down — who would waste their time over a device that probably won't work for very long? Here's where the problem lays: It's law enforcement that's pushing so hard for these kill switches. We first learned about this last summer, and this past May, California passed a law that requires smartphone vendors to implement the feature. In practice, if a smartphone has been stolen, or has been somehow compromised, its user or manufacturer would be able to remotely kill off its usability, something that would be reversed once the phone gets back into its rightful owner's hands. However, such functionality should be limited to the device's owner, and no one else. If the owner can disable a phone with nothing but access to a computer or another mobile device, so can Google, Samsung, Microsoft, Nokia or Apple. If the designers of a phone's operating system can brick a phone, guess who else can do the same? Everybody from the NSA to your friendly neighborhood police force, that's who. At most, all they'll need is a convincing argument that they're acting in the interest of "public safety."

Your Phone Can Be Snooped On Using Its Gyroscope

posted 2 weeks | from stephendavion

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stephendavion (2872091) writes Researchers will demonstrate the process used to spy on smartphones using gyroscopes at Usenix Security event on August 22, 2014. Researchers from Stanford and a defense research group at Rafael will demonstrate a way to spy on smartphones using gyroscopes at Usenix Security event on August 22, 2014. According to the "Gyrophone: Recognizing Speech From Gyroscope Signals" study, the gyroscopes integrated into smartphones were sensitive enough to enable some sound waves to be picked up, transforming them into crude microphones.