Mobile Development

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Mobile Development Talent Community

News and advice for development on mobile platforms, including Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Windows and other platforms. Includes information regarding operating sytems, training, and distribution of applications. Android | iOS | Mobile Development Industry Following this community adds its articles and discussions to My Tech Feed.

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Anything but Business as Usual

Capital One began as an information strategy company that specialized in credit cards, and we’ve become one of the most impactful players in the industry. We’re recruiting talented software engineers and mobile product managers who can envision next-generation mobile innovations that will deliver a rich, engaging, and unmatched customer experience. Are you ready to join?

The Latest from Dice

iOS 8 Release Day: What You Need to Know

Apple iOS 8
It’s September, which means it’s time for Apple to release the latest version of its mobile operating system. If everything goes according to plan, everybody who owns an iPhone, iPod or iPad (or at least certain generations of those devices) will have the ability to download iOS 8 for free once it becomes available Sept. 17. In reality, the crush of people attempting to download the software will almost certainly lead to delays, device crashes, angry Tweets and Facebook postings,… continue…

Apple Watch: Worth Your Development Hours?

Apple Sport Watch
Although Apple revealed quite a bit about its new timepiece at yesterday’s keynote event, it didn’t offer much detail about the device’s developer SDK. Click here to find Apple-related jobs. But as the Apple Watch heads for release sometime in 2015, the role of developers in the device’s ecosystem will only increase in importance. Developers who take the plunge into smart watches will face some key challenges: Screen Size: The Apple Watch, along with rivals such as the new Moto… continue…

Business-App Developers: Pay Attention to Oculus Rift

Oculus Rift
Those who know about Oculus VR, maker of the Oculus Rift virtual-reality headset, assume that the company (along with third-party developers) will devote the bulk of its time and attention to gaming. After all, the firm boasts legendary game developer John Carmack as its CTO, and every video it produces seems to focus on the device’s ability to deliver an immersive gaming experience. With Oculus’s reputation on the rise (thanks in large part to its acquisition by Facebook), other companies… continue…

Check Out the Dice Job Search App 2.0

Dice Job Search App
Dice has released an updated version of the Dice Job Search App, loaded with nifty new features. The app, available for iOS devices, allows users to browse, share, and apply for thousands of open tech-pro jobs. New features include the ability to create a Dice account from within the app, add a resume to an account from your mobile device, and preview resumes and cover letters while on the go. Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume.… continue…

Amazon’s Fire Phone Might Be a Flop

Amazon Fire Phone
In June, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduced the Fire Phone, the online retailer’s first smartphone. Unlike Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets, which compete at the low end of the touch-screen market, the Fire Phone is a premium device, built and priced to challenge Apple’s iPhone and the Samsung Galaxy line. It runs Fire OS 3.5.0, an operating system built atop Google Android, and features apps such as Firefly, which detects objects in the environment and tells you whether they’re for sale… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Next Android To Enable Local Encryption By Default Too, Says Google

posted 1 hour | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes The same day that Apple announced that iOS 8 will encrypt device data with a local code that is not shared with Apple, Google has pointed out that Android already offers the same feature as a user option and that the next version will enable it by default. The announcements by both major cell phone [operating system makers] underscores a new emphasis on privacy in the wake of recent government surveillance revelations in the U.S. At the same time, it leaves unresolved the tension between security and convenience when both companies' devices are configured to upload user content to iCloud and Google+ servers for backup and synchronization across devices, servers and content to which Apple and Google do have access.

London's Crime Hot Spots Predicted Using Mobile Phone Data

posted 9 hours | from kentuckyfc

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KentuckyFC (1144503) writes A growing number of police forces around the world are using data on past crimes to predict the likelihood of crimes in the future. These predictions can be made more accurate by combining crime data with local demographic data about the local population. However, this data is time consuming and expensive to collect and so only updated rarely. Now a team of data experts have shown how combing crime data with data collected from mobile phones can make the prediction of future crimes even more accurate. The team used an anonymised dataset of O2 mobile phone users in the London metropolitan area during December 2012 and January 2013. They then used a small portion of the data to train a machine learning algorithm to find correlations between this and local crime statistics in the same period. Finally, they used the trained algorithm to predict future crime rates in the same areas. Without the mobile phone data, the predictions have an accuracy of 62 per cent. But the phone data increases this accuracy significantly to almost 70 per cent. What's more, the data is cheap to collect and can be gathered in more or less real time. Whether the general population would want their data used in this way is less clear but either way Minority Report-style policing is looking less far-fetched than when the film appeared in 2002.

Apple Locks iPhone 6/6+ NFC To Apple Pay Only

posted 16 hours | from ronin developer

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Ronin Developer writes From the Cnet article: "At last week's Apple event, the company announced Apple Pay — a new mobile payments service that utilizes NFC technology in conjunction with its Touch ID fingerprint scanner for secure payments that can be made from the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus or Apple Watch. Apple also announced a number of retailers that would accept Apple Pay for mobile payments at launch. However, Cult of Mac reports that NFC will be locked to the Apple Pay platform, meaning the technology will not be available for other uses. An Apple spokesperson confirmed the lock down of the technology, saying developers would be restricted from utilizing its NFC chip functionality for at least a year. Apple declined to comment on whether NFC capability would remain off limits beyond that period." So, it would appear, for at least a year, that Apple doesn't want competing mobile payment options to be available on the newly released iPhone 6 and 6+. While it's understandable that they want to promote their payment scheme and achieve a critical mass for Apple Pay, it's a strategy that may very well backfire as other other mobile payment vendors gain strength on competing platforms.

Scientists Twist Radio Beams To Send Data At 32 Gigabits Per Second

posted 18 hours | from concertina226

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concertina226 writes Scientists from three international universities have succeeded in twisting radio beams in order to transfer data at the speed of 32 gigabits per second, which is 30 times faster than 4G LTE wireless technology in use today. The researchers, led by Alan Willner, an electrical engineering professor with the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, successfully demonstrated data transmission rates of 32 gigabits per second across 2.5m of free space in a basement laboratory.

iOS 8 Review

posted 1 day | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Apple is releasing iOS 8 today, and Ars Technica has posted one of their huge, thorough reviews of the updated operating system. They have this to say about the UI: "iOS 8 tries to fit a whole lot more stuff onto a single screen than iOS 7 did. The operating system was clearly developed in anticipation of iPhones with larger screens." The biggest new feature is Extensions: "Older versions of iOS limited what third-party applications could do to communicate with external services and other third-party applications. ... Extensions remove some (but not all) of those barriers." The biggest examples of extensions are custom keyboards, a feature iOS users have been requesting for years. Downsides to iOS 8 include increased storage and processing requirements, which are bad news for older iPhones, and a host of new bugs associated with the new features.

Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

posted 2 days | from sockatume

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Sockatume writes: If you've been browsing Apple's site leading up to the iPhone 6 launch, you might've noticed something a little odd. Apple has edited the handset's protruding camera out of every single side-on view of the phone. (The camera is, necessarily, retained for images showing the back of the device.) The absence is particularly conspicuous given the number of side views Apple uses to emphasize the device's thinness.

Browser To Facilitate Text Browsing In Emergencies

posted 2 days | from rambo tribble

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Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes "Programmers at Fast Company are developing the Cosmos browser to allow text browsing from Android phones when networks are buckling under the load of local disasters. A common phenomenon when disaster strikes is the overloading of cell and data networks by massively increased traffic. The Cosmos browser is intended to facilitate using SMS text messages, which often still get through in such circumstances. To quote one developer, "We want this to be a way for people to get information when they're in dire need of it." Sort of a Lynx comes to Android affair. The Smithsonian contemplates the possibilities, here."

Chinese City Sets Up "No Cell Phone" Pedestrian Lanes

posted 3 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes The Chinese city of Chongqing has created a smartphone sidewalk lane, offering a path for those too caught up in messaging and tweeting to watch where they're going. "There are lots of elderly people and children in our street, and walking with your cell phone may cause unnecessary collisions here," said Nong Cheng, a spokeswoman for the district's property management company. However, she clarified that the initiative was meant to be a satirical way to highlight the dangers of texting and walking.

Google's Android One Initiative Launches In India With Three $100 Phones

posted 3 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes Google has unveiled its first set of Android One low-cost smartphones in the Indian market, partnering with Indian hardware vendors Spice, Micromax and Karbonn. The three phones will be available online on Flipkart, Amazon and Snapdeal and via Reliance Digital, Croma and The Mobile Store, offline. The phones provide a minimum set of features determined by Google, which has sourced several of the components to help cut manufacturing costs. The company has also teamed up with a local network to make it cheaper to download Android updates and new apps.

Sapphire Glass Didn't Pass iPhone Drop Test According to Reports

posted 4 days | from sternishefan

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SternisheFan notes reports about why Apple didn't use sapphire glass screens in the latest iPhones as many expected. Sapphire screens were part of the iPhone 6 design until the glass repeatedly cracked during standard drop tests conducted by Apple suppliers. So Apple abandoned its sapphire plans before the iPhone 6 product launch September 9. VentureBeat has learned that recent supplier channel checks by an IDC analyst yielded several reports of the sapphire failures and Apple's decision against using the glass material. As we heard on Tuesday in Cupertino, both the iPhone 6 and the larger iPhone 6 Plus will ship with screens made of "ion-strengthened" glass. This was apparently Apple's second choice. IDC analyst Danielle Levitas says it isn't clear when exactly the drop-test failures took place, or when Apple abandoned plans for sapphire-screened iPhones. She says the poor drop-test results, combined with the relative high cost of sapphire glass, could have made plans to ship sapphire glass phones too risky. One researcher who covers GT Advanced Technologies, the company that was to produce the glass for the iPhone 6, wrote in a research note earlier this week that plans for the sapphire screens were cancelled in August, just weeks before the September 9 launch. The new Apple Watches (except the "Sport" version) do use sapphire for their screens. Levitas believes that the glass for the smaller 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch watch screens was less likely to break in drop tests.