Linux

A Dice Talent Community

Linux Dice Talent Community

This community’s intended to promote growth and collaboration in the Linux world specifically, but also throughout the Open Source world. We aim to offer insightful observations from Dice bloggers as well professionals in the field, guidance to fundamentals and best practices, links to resources and answers to your questions.

Click here for Linux fundamentals and trends.

Following this community adds its articles and discussions to My Tech Feed.

Please note: This community is no longer being updated.

The Latest News From Dice

Getting Started With Linux Certifications

Posted In Linux, Looking in Tech
Linux
Earlier this year, 77 percent of hiring managers told a Linux Foundation/Dice poll that they ranked hiring Linux talent among their priorities for 2014, up from 70 percent the previous year. But is a Linux certification the best path to getting one of those jobs? That depends on a number of factors. Research the Market Do you have an idea of what sort of technology job you want to pursue? If so, research to see if Linux is a necessary… continue…

SourceForge Interview: OpenMediaVault (OMV)

Posted In Linux, Working in Tech
OpenMediaProject
Over at SourceForge, the September “Community Choice” Project of the Month is OpenMediaVault (OMV), a next-generation network attached storage (NAS) solution based on Debian Linux. The platform offers services such as SSH, (S)FTP, SMB/CIFS, DAAP media server, RSync, and BitTorrent client (amongst others). The project manager, Volker Theile took a few moments to talk about the history and purpose of OMV, which he began in 2009. Click here to find open source developer jobs. Tell me about the OpenMediaVault project,… continue…

From Linux Sys Admin to Programmer in 3 Easy Steps

C Programming
We got an email from a Dice user: “I’d like to move from Linux systems administration to programming. What’s the best way to make a smooth transition?” He’s in a good place. His knowledge of Linux servers, the Linux command line, distribution and tools will serve as a solid foundation for a career in programming and development. Plus, learning how to program the Linux kernel will boost his market value and help him capitalize on the growth of DevOps, notes… continue…

PHP vs. .NET: Which Should You Learn?

shutterstock_127502615
If you’re a software developer, there simply isn’t enough time in the world to learn every single technology, language and platform you might need for work, or to land a better job; at some point, you’re going to have to decide in what direction you want to expand your knowledge base. The choices you make in that regard will have a huge impact on your life. If you devote too much time to learning a technology that’s on the verge… continue…

Using Netcat to Read, Write Data Across Your Network

Posted In Linux, Working in Tech
Wi-Fi Testing
Testing a network connection or troubleshooting a data flow is a common job for the system admin or developer. One tool they can take advantage of: the Netcat command line program, which provides a quick way to read and write data between two devices over a TCP/IP network. I recently used several flavors of Netcat to help me develop a servo control program between the new Arduino Yun and a simple companion slider application, written in Processing, on my Linux… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

GNOME 3.16 Released

posted 6 days | from kthreadd

gnome 193

kthreadd writes Version 3.16 of GNOME, the primary desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems has been released. Some major new features in this release include a overhauled notification system, an updated design of the calendar drop down and support for overlay scrollbars. Also, the grid view in Files has been improved with bigger thumbnail icons, making the appearance more attractive and the rows easier to read. A video is available which demonstrates the new version.

How Device Drivers Are Reverse Engineered

posted 2 weeks | from anonymous coward

opensource 27

An anonymous reader writes: Linux Voice magazine has published a long article about how people go about reverse engineering drivers for hardware peripherals. They use Python and a USB radio-controlled car to demonstrate, walking us through the entire process. It's a cool, easy-to-follow insight into what often seems to be a rather opaque process.

OEMs Allowed To Lock Secure Boot In Windows 10 Computers

posted 2 weeks | from jones_supa

crime 362

jones_supa writes: Hardware that sports the "Designed for Windows 8" logo requires machines to support UEFI Secure Boot. When the feature is enabled, the core software components used to boot the machine are verified for correct cryptographic signatures, or the system refuses to boot. This is a desirable security feature, because it protects from malware sneaking into the boot process. However, it has an issue for alternative operating systems, because it's likely they won't have a signature that Secure Boot will authorize. No worries, because Microsoft also mandated that every system must have a UEFI configuration setting to turn the protection off, allowing booting other operating systems. This situation may now change. At its WinHEC hardware conference in Shenzhen, China, Microsoft said the setting to allow Secure Boot to be turned off will become optional when Windows 10 arrives. Hardware can be "Designed for Windows 10," and offer no way to opt out of the Secure Boot lock down. The choice to provide the setting (or not) will be up to the original equipment manufacturer.

Ask Slashdot: Choosing a Laptop To Support Physics Research?

posted 2 weeks | from anonymous coward

askslashdot 385

An anonymous reader writes My daughter is in her third year of college as a physics major. She has an internship in Europe this summer, will graduate next year, and continue with graduate physics studies. Her area of research interest is in gravitational waves and particle physics. She currently has a laptop running Win7 and wants to buy a new laptop. She would like to use Linux on it, and plans to use it for C++ programming, data analysis and simulations (along with the usual email, surfing, music, pictures, etc). For all of the physics-savvy Slashdotters out there: what should she get? PC? Mac? What do you recommend for running Linux? For a C++ development environment? What laptop do you use and how is it configured to support your physics-related activities?

Not Quite Dead: SCO Linux Suit Against IBM Stirs In Utah

posted 2 weeks | from anonymous coward

caldera 170

An anonymous reader points to a story in the Salt Lake Tribune which says that The nearly defunct Utah company SCO Group Inc. and IBM filed a joint report to the U.S. District Court in Salt Lake City saying that legal issues remain in the case, which was initiated in 2003 with SCO claiming damages of $5 billion against the technology giant, based in Armonk, N.Y. That likely means that U.S. District Judge David Nuffer, who now presides over the dispute, will start moving the lawsuit — largely dormant for about four years while a related suit against Novell Inc. was adjudicated — ahead. What kind of issues? In addition to its claims of IBM misappropriation of code, SCO alleges that IBM executives and lawyers directed the company's Linux programmers to destroy source code on their computers after SCO made its allegations. The company's other remaining claims are that IBM's actions amounted to unfair competition and interference with its contracts and business relations with other companies. IBM has remaining claims against SCO that allege the Utah company violated contracts, copied and distributed IBM code that had been placed in Linux and that SCO created a campaign of "fear, uncertainty and doubt" about IBM's products and services because of the dispute over Unix code.

Linux Might Need To Claim Only ACPI 2.0 Support For BIOS

posted 3 weeks | from jones_supa

os 129

jones_supa writes Some of us remember the story of why Linux kernel responds "False" when ACPI BIOS asks if the operating system is Linux. We have found yet another case where mimicking the Windows behavior instead of writing to the spec is the right choice if you just want your machine to work properly. The ACPI spec defines the _REV object as evaluating to the revision of the ACPI specification that the OS implements. Linux returns 5 for this, because Linux actually tries to implement ACPI 5.0, but Windows returns 2 (ACPI 2.0), possibly due to legacy reasons. Linux kernel expert Matthew Garrett discovered that still a fair amount of brokenness appears when 5 is returned as the revision, including a Dell machine which left the sound hardware in a misconfigured state. He is proposing a kernel patch which simply reports _REV as 2 on all x86 hardware.

The Role of a Nonprofit In Open Source Development

posted 3 weeks | from jrepin

kde 49

jrepin writes KDE is among the biggest open source projects which continues to innovate and evolve with the changing times. Often we have seen this particular community create technologies ahead of its time which were later adopted by other projects. The Linux Foundation talked to Lydia Pintscher, the president of the KDE e.V., the nonprofit organization that oversees the legal and financial aspects of the KDE project, to understand the relationship between the community and the organization. We also discussed the challenge of recruiting more women to open source projects and women in the KDE community.

Steam On Linux Now Has Over a Thousand Games Available

posted 3 weeks | from anonymous coward

steam 192

An anonymous reader writes: This week the Steam Linux client has crossed the threshold of having more than 1,000 native Linux games available while Steam in total has just under 5,000 games. This news comes while the reported Steam Linux market-share is just about 1.0%, but Valve continues brewing big plans for Linux gaming. Is 2015 the year of the Linux gaming system?

Linux Kernel Adopts 'Code of Conflict'

posted 3 weeks | from motor

developers 93

Motor was one of several readers to note that a small patch recently added to the Linux kernel contains guidelines for discourse and dispute resolution within the community. It's called the "Code of Conflict." Quoting: Your code and ideas behind it will be carefully reviewed, often resulting in critique and criticism. The review will almost always require improvements to the code before it can be included in the kernel. Know that this happens because everyone involved wants to see the best possible solution for the overall success of Linux. .... If however, anyone feels personally abused, threatened, or otherwise uncomfortable due to this process, that is not acceptable. ... As a reviewer of code, please strive to keep things civil and focused on the technical issues involved.

Kali Linux On a Raspberry Pi (A/B+/2) With LUKS Disk Encryption

posted 3 weeks | from anonymous coward

linux 37

An anonymous reader writes With the advent of smaller, faster ARM hardware such as the new Raspberry Pi 2 (which now has a Kali image built for it), we've been seeing more and more use of these small devices as 'throw-away computers'. While this might be a new and novel technology, there's one major drawback to this concept – and that is the confidentiality of the data stored on the device itself. Most of the setups do little to protect the sensitive information saved on the SD cards of these little computers.