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The Latest News From Dice

Getting Started With Linux Certifications

Posted In Linux, Looking in Tech
Linux
Earlier this year, 77 percent of hiring managers told a Linux Foundation/Dice poll that they ranked hiring Linux talent among their priorities for 2014, up from 70 percent the previous year. But is a Linux certification the best path to getting one of those jobs? That depends on a number of factors. Research the Market Do you have an idea of what sort of technology job you want to pursue? If so, research to see if Linux is a necessary… continue…

SourceForge Interview: OpenMediaVault (OMV)

Posted In Linux, Working in Tech
OpenMediaProject
Over at SourceForge, the September “Community Choice” Project of the Month is OpenMediaVault (OMV), a next-generation network attached storage (NAS) solution based on Debian Linux. The platform offers services such as SSH, (S)FTP, SMB/CIFS, DAAP media server, RSync, and BitTorrent client (amongst others). The project manager, Volker Theile took a few moments to talk about the history and purpose of OMV, which he began in 2009. Click here to find open source developer jobs. Tell me about the OpenMediaVault project,… continue…

From Linux Sys Admin to Programmer in 3 Easy Steps

C Programming
We got an email from a Dice user: “I’d like to move from Linux systems administration to programming. What’s the best way to make a smooth transition?” He’s in a good place. His knowledge of Linux servers, the Linux command line, distribution and tools will serve as a solid foundation for a career in programming and development. Plus, learning how to program the Linux kernel will boost his market value and help him capitalize on the growth of DevOps, notes… continue…

PHP vs. .NET: Which Should You Learn?

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If you’re a software developer, there simply isn’t enough time in the world to learn every single technology, language and platform you might need for work, or to land a better job; at some point, you’re going to have to decide in what direction you want to expand your knowledge base. The choices you make in that regard will have a huge impact on your life. If you devote too much time to learning a technology that’s on the verge… continue…

Using Netcat to Read, Write Data Across Your Network

Posted In Linux, Working in Tech
Wi-Fi Testing
Testing a network connection or troubleshooting a data flow is a common job for the system admin or developer. One tool they can take advantage of: the Netcat command line program, which provides a quick way to read and write data between two devices over a TCP/IP network. I recently used several flavors of Netcat to help me develop a servo control program between the new Arduino Yun and a simple companion slider application, written in Processing, on my Linux… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

AMD Publishes New 'AMDGPU' Linux Graphics Driver

posted 2 hours | from anonymous coward

graphics 52

An anonymous reader writes: AMD has made available its new AMDGPU Linux graphics driver comprised of a brand new DRM/KMS kernel driver, a new xf86-video-amdgpu X11 driver, and modifications to libdrm and Gallium3D. This new AMDGPU driver is designed for supporting AMD's next-generation hardware with no support differences for currently supported Radeon GPUs. While yet to be released, this new AMDGPU driver is the critical piece to the new unified driver strategy with Catalyst where their high performance proprietary driver will now become limited to being a user-space binary component that uses this open-source kernel driver.

John Hawley Talks About UAV Controls (Video)

posted 3 days | from roblimo

linux 20

John 'Warthog9' Hawley was the boss sysadmin on kernel.org before he jumped to Intel in April, 2014, as an open hardware technical evangelist. He last showed up on Slashdot in June, 2014, with his Dr. Who-inspired Robot K-9. Now he's talking about flight computers for quadcopters, specifically ones based on MinnowBoards. Last month (April 2015) he was speaking at the Embedded Linux Conference + Android Builders Summit. That's where he and Timothy Lord had this conversation about flight controllers for UAVs, which makes it a fitting sequel to yesterday's video, which was also about controlling drones with real-time Linux.

KDE Plasma 5.3 Beta Brings Lot of Improvements

posted 5 days | from jones_supa

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jones_supa writes: The KDE project today announced the release of KDE Plasma 5.3 beta. It brings better power management, improved Bluetooth support, improved widgets, Wayland support, new media center, and nearly 350 bugfixes. The power management improvements include settings that can be independently configured per activity, there is a new energy usage monitor available in KInfoCenter, and a battery applet identifies applications that hog power. Bluetooth applet brings added support for blocking and unblocking devices. New touchpad module has been added as well. The combined window manager and compositor KWin is now able to start a nested XWayland server, which acts as a bridge between the old X11 and the new Wayland world.

Linux Getting Extensive x86 Assembly Code Refresh

posted 1 week | from jones_supa

os 209

jones_supa writes: A massive x86 assembly code spring cleaning has been done in a pull request that is to end up in Linux 4.1. The developers have tried testing the code on many different x86 boxes, but there's risk of regression when exposing the code to many more systems in the days and weeks ahead. That being said, the list of improvements is excellent. There are over 100 separate cleanups, restructuring changes, speedups and fixes in the x86 system call, IRQ, trap and other entry code, part of a heroic effort to deobfuscate a decade old spaghetti assembly code and its C code dependencies.

Linux 4.0 Kernel Released

posted 1 week | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes "The Linux 4.0 kernel has been released. Linux 4.0 brings many features including live patching, Radeon DisplayPort Audio, RadeonSI fan control improvements, new OverlayFS functionality, Intel Quark SoC support, and a heck of a lot more. Linus's release announcement reads in part: "So I decided to release 4.0 as per the normal schedule, because there really weren't any known issues, and while I'll be traveling during the end of the upcoming week due to a college visit, I'm hoping that won't affect the merge window very much. We'll see. Linux 4.0 was a pretty small release both in linux-next and in final size, although obviously 'small' is all relative. It's still over 10k non-merge commits. But we've definitely had bigger releases (and judging by linux-next v4.1 is going to be one of the bigger ones)."

First Alpha of Public Sector Linux Deployment System

posted 1 week | from mathiasfriman

linux 84

New submitter mathiasfriman writes: SverigeLinux (SwedenLinux in Swedish) is a project financed by the Swedish Internet Fund that is developing a Linux deployment system for the public sector. It is based on DebianLAN and has just released its first public early alpha version. This 7 minute video shows how you can deploy up to 100 workstations with minimal Linux knowledge in under an hour, complete with DHCP, DNS and user data in LDAP, logins using Kerberos and centralized storage. The project has a home on GitHub and is looking for testers and developers. Don't worry, no Björgen Kjörgen; it's all in English.

1+ Year Running Arch Linux On a Lenovo Yoga 2 Chronicled

posted 2 weeks | from keithcu

linux 74

New submitter KeithCu writes with a lengthy explanation of the joys (and just a handful of glitches) he's had in running Arch Linux on his ultraportable, a Lenovo Yoga 2. Other than the hardware-specific issues, I've been amazed by how well Arch Linux works, given that it doesn't have release cycles, or a big team with a lot of money supporting and marketing it. I've heard only 30 developers maintain the core Arch packages, with most of them having a full-time job doing something else! At the same time, it shouldn't be a total surprise things work so well, because free software doesn't just fall off a turnip truck. Not many reviews feature pictures of a laptop charred from building LibreOffice.

GCC 5.0 To Support OpenMP 4.0, Intel Cilk Plus, C++14

posted 2 weeks | from anonymous coward

gnu 57

An anonymous reader writes: GCC 5 is coming up for release in the next few weeks and is presenting an extraordinary number of new features: C11 support by default, experimental C++14 support, full C++11 support in libstdc++, OpenMP 4.0 with Xeon Phi / GPU offloading, Intel Cilk Plus multi-threading, new ARM processor support, Intel AVX-512 handling, and much more. This is a big release, so those wishing to test it ahead of time can obtain the preliminary GCC 5 source code from GCC's snapshots mirror.

10 Years of Git: An Interview With Linus Torvalds

posted 2 weeks | from libbymc

git 203

LibbyMC writes Git will celebrate its 10-year anniversary tomorrow. To celebrate this milestone, Linus shares the behind-the-scenes story of Git and tells us what he thinks of the project and its impact on software development. From the article: "Ten years ago this week, the Linux kernel community faced a daunting challenge: They could no longer use their revision control system BitKeeper and no other Software Configuration Management (SCMs) met their needs for a distributed system. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, took the challenge into his own hands and disappeared over the weekend to emerge the following week with Git. Today Git is used for thousands of projects and has ushered in a new level of social coding among programmers."

Visual Studio 2015 Can Target Linux; Android Apps Anywhere Chrome Can Run

posted 3 weeks | from jones_supa

android 96

jones_supa writes Phoronix has noticed that the Visual Studio 2015 product page mentions that the new IDE can target Linux out of the box. Specifically the page says "Build for iOS, Android, Windows devices, Windows Server or Linux". What this actually means is not completely certain at this point, but it certainly laces nicely with the company opening up the .NET Framework. And speaking of cross-platform software: new submitter mccrew writes Google has released a tool that lets Android apps run on any machine that can run its Chrome browser. Called Arc Welder, the tool acts as a wrapper around Android apps so they can run on Windows, OS X and Linux machines. The software expands the places that Android apps can run and might make it easier for developers to get code working on different machines.