Java

A Dice Talent Community

Java Dice Talent Community

A community for Java developers and fans of the now ubiquitous mobile platform. We’ll explore available development tools, best practices, as well as mobile and enterprise deployment.

Click here for information about Java fundamentals.

Following this community adds its articles to My Tech Feed.

Please note: This community is no longer being updated. Please check the Programming Talent Community.

Latest News From Dice

Coding Challenge Wrap-Up: Who Won the Map

Roman Trade Network
Compared to our previous coding challenges, May’s was a modest affair, with just three entries coming in from Rick Matter, Jon Pattinson and Jay Nagel. And, despite opening the entries to include Delphi, Go and Python as well as C/C++, Java and C#, all three were written in Java! (You can find all the competition files here.) In this challenge, you were given a 20×20 map that contained 20 trading islands, each occupying a square. Each island was a trading… continue…

How to Write a Game Runner Program

Cards
I wrote the runsevens game runner program to automate the running of the Tournament of Sevens programming challenge, and it was an interesting little project. It’s designed to do the following: Maintain a ladder of players. Run games of Sevens for a number of players by executing standalone exes. Update the ladder with games’ results. That’s a fairly high-level view. Running each game of Sevens also requires shuffling a deck of cards, dealing them to the players and tracking card… continue…

Is Apache Spark the Next Big Thing in Big Data?

Data Transfer
In any article or blog post, any mention of Big Data usually includes something about Hadoop. When it comes to Big Data, Apache Hadoop has been the big elephant in the room, and the release of Hadoop 2.0 in 2013 made the environment easier and more stable. But even with the inclusion of Impala for querying stored information real-time, Hadoop is still a batch-based system that processes data in, well, batch mode. Big Data processing is said to have three… continue…

Tournament of Sevens: Week 1 Results

Marathon
Though the Tournament of Sevens coding challenge took much longer to get off the ground than expected, I’ve taken steps to sort out the bot bugginess and the contest is now roaring ahead. The first week included 16 viable competitors, out of 19 entries. One obstacle in getting this going was from Eclipse projects. The problem with them is that their source files end up in different places and the IDE is a bit fiddly building and deploying the class… continue…

Interview Questions for Java Developers

Posted In Java, Looking in Tech
Dice Interview Qs Icon
With an estimated 9 million developers using it, Java is one of the most popular programming languages around. In fact, some estimate that Java powers more than 3 billion devices. With so many people claiming expertise, IT managers often ask tricky technical questions to separate the novices from senior developers, says David Bolton, guide of the Dice Java Talent Community. Here are some questions you can expect to hear. What is Type Erasure? What Most People Say: “Umm, I’m not… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

It's Time To Revive Hypercard

posted 4 hours | from hughpickens.com

education 38

HughPickens.com writes HyperCard, an application program and programming tool released for the Apple Macintosh in 1987, represented the 'computing for the people' philosophy that enabled users to go past the pre-built software that came on their machines, and to program and build software of their own. "Mac users could use Hypercard to build their own mini-programs to balance their taxes, manage sports statistics, make music – all kinds of individualized software that would be useful (or fun) for individual users." Now Jer Thorp writes that the end of HyperCard left a huge gap that desperately needs to be filled – a space for an easy to use, intuitive tool that will once again let average computer users make their own tools. According to Throp, this type of plain-language programming makes sense, particularly in an application that was designed specifically for non-programmers. "I find the largest concern for learners to be not with the conceptual hurdles involved in writing a program, but with obscure and confusing syntax requirements. I would love to be able to teach HyperTalk to my students, as a smooth on-road to more complex languages like JavaScript, Java or C++." By putting the tools of creation into the hands of the broader userbase, we would allow for the creation of ultra-specific personalized apps that, aside from a few exceptions, don't exist today."

HyperTalk wasn't just easy, it was also fairly powerful. Complex object structures could be built to handle complicated tasks, and the base language could be expanded by a variety of available external commands and functions (XCMDs and XFCNs, respectively), which were precursors to the modern plug-in. But ultimately, HyperCard would disappear from Mac computers by the mid-nineties, eclipsed by web browsers and other applications which it had itself inspired. The last copy of HyperCard was sold by Apple in 2004. "One thing that's changed in the intervening decades is that the hobbyist has largely gone by the wayside. Now you're either a user or a full-fledged developer, and the gulf is wider than ever," writes Peter Cohen. "There's really nothing like it today, and I think the Mac is lesser for it."

Tao3D: a New Open-Source Programming Language For Real-Time 3D Animations

posted 32 mins | from descubes

graphics 85

descubes (35093) writes "Tao3D is a new open-source programming language designed for real-time 3D animations. With it, you can quickly create interactive, data-rich presentations, small applications, proofs of concept, user interface prototypes, and more. The interactivity of the language, combined with its simplicity and graphical aspects, make it ideal to teach programming.

Tao3D also demonstrates a lot of innovation in programming language design. It makes it very easy to create new control structures. Defining if-then-else is literally a couple of lines of code. The syntax to pass pass blocks of code to functions is completely transparent. And it is fully reactive, meaning that it automatically reacts as necessary to external events such as mouse movements or the passage of time.

The source code was just made available under the GNU General Public License v3 on SourceForge [as linked above], GitHub and Gitorious."

Mark Zuckerberg And John Doerr Donate $1M To Expand The Hour Of Code Campaign

posted 1 day | from theodp

money 24

theodp writes Techcrunch reports that Mark Zuckerberg has donated $500K to expand the Hour of Code campaign, which aims to reach 100 million students this year with its learn-to-code tutorials, including its top-featured tutorial starring Zuckerberg (video). Techcrunch adds that Zuckerberg's donation will be matched by fellow tutorial team teacher Bill Gates (video), Microsoft, Reid Hoffman, Salesforce, Google, and others. Zuck and Gates appear to have a sizable captive audience — a Code.org District Partnership Model brochure on the code-or-no-HS-diploma-for-you Chicago Public Schools' website calls for partner districts to "hold a district-wide Hour of Code event each year" for three years.

Getting 'Showdown' To 90 FPS In UE4 On Oculus Rift

posted 1 day | from anonymous coward

games 30

An anonymous reader writes Oculus has repeatedly tapped Epic Games to whip up demos to show off new iterations of Oculus Rift VR headset hardware. The latest demo, built in UE4, is 'Showdown', an action-packed scene of slow motion explosions, bullets, and debris. The challenge? Oculus asked Epic to make it run at 90 FPS to match the 90 Hz refresh rate of the latest Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype. At the Oculus Connect conference, two of the developers from the team that created the demo share the tricks and tools they used to hit that target on a single GPU.

Google Announces Project Ara Developer Conference, Shows Off First Prototype

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

design 65

An anonymous reader writes Google today announced it will be hosting the second iteration of its Project Ara Module Developers Conference for its modular device project early next year. The first event will be in Mountain View on January 14, 2015, with satellite locations at Google offices in New York City, Buenos Aires, and London. The same agenda will be repeated in Singapore on January 21, 2015, with satellite locations at Google offices in Bangalore, Tokyo, Taipei, and Shanghai. The company also released a video showing off the first prototype from Project Ara. Until now, all we've seen so far are industrial design models. This one actually boots up.

It's Official: HTML5 Is a W3C Standard

posted 4 days | from rjmarvin

html5 115

rjmarvin (3001897) writes The Worldwide Web Consortium today has elevated the HTML5 specification to 'recommendation' status , giving it the group's highest level of endorsement, which is akin to becoming a standard. The W3C also introduced Application Foundations with the announcement of the HTML5 recommendation to aid developers in writing Web applications, and said the organization is working with patents holders of the H.264 codec to agree on a baseline royalty-free interoperability level commitment.

Here's Why Apple Rejected Your iOS App

posted 5 days | from nerval's lobster

apple 145

Nerval's Lobster writes Everybody knows that Apple runs a tight ship when it comes to approving iOS apps for its App Store, rejecting software because it features porn, allows gambling, installs types of executable code, etc. But Apple also denies apps for some pretty esoteric reasons, many of which are only just coming to light. Want to have an App that uses GPS to automatically control a real-world aircraft or automobile? Sorry, that's not allowed, presumably because Apple doesn't want iOS to serve as a drone controller. (Imagine the liability issues.) Also, apps that report your location to emergency services are forbidden, as well as any that misspell Apple product names ("iTunz" will never make it through, no matter how much you beg). Even if Apple's not sharing the exact reason why it just rejected your app from its store (what the heck does "Not enough lasting value" mean?), you can check out Apple's own page on the top reasons for iOS app rejections."

Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment

posted 5 days | from theodp

cs 606

theodp writes After an NPR podcast fingered the marketing of computers to boys as the culprit behind the declining percentages of women in undergraduate CS curricula since 1984 (a theory seconded by Smithsonian mag), some are concluding that NPR got the wrong guy. Calling 'When Women Stopped Coding' quite engaging, but long on Political Correctness and short on real evidence, UC Davis CS Prof Norm Matloff concedes a sexist element, but largely ascribes the gender lopsidedness to economics. "That women are more practical than men, and that the well-publicized drastic swings in the CS labor market are offputting to women more than men," writes Matloff, and "was confirmed by a 2008 survey in the Communications of the ACM" (related charts of U.S. unemployment rates and Federal R&D spending in the '80s). Looking at the raw numbers of female CS grads instead of percentages, suggests there wasn't a sudden and unexpected disappearance of a generation of women coders, but rather a dilution in their percentages as women's growth in undergrad CS ranks was far outpaced by men, including a boom around the time of the dot-com boom/bust.

OpenSUSE Factory To Merge With Tumbleweed

posted 6 days | from sfcrazy

suse 24

sfcrazy writes Factory and Tumbleweed will merge to become a single release. The release will follow the development cycle of Factory but take the more appealing name, Tumbleweed. Commenting on the new development Greg Kroah-Hartman said, “The changes to the Factory release model have changed it from being an unstable development codebase into the type of rolling release I set out to create when starting openSUSE Tumbleweed. I’m very happy to see these two rolling releases coming together under the name Tumbleweed, and am looking forward to watching how it develops in the future.” Factory won't disappear; It will become a "development project" for creating the "user-ready" Tumbleweed."

Tetris Is Hard To Test

posted 6 days | from jackdw

testing 169

New submitter JackDW writes: Tetris is one of the best-known computer games ever made. It's easy to play but hard to master, and it's based on a NP-hard problem. But that's not all that's difficult about it. Though it's simple enough to be implemented in one line of BBC BASIC, it's complex enough to be really hard to thoroughly test.

It may seem like you can test everything in Tetris just by playing it for a few minutes, but this is very unlikely! As I explain in this article, the game is filled with special cases that rarely occur in normal play, and these can only be easily found with the help of a coverage tool.