iOS

A Dice Talent Community

iOS Dice Talent Community

iOS pretty much started the revolution of the Smart Device. It and Android are the two most popular development environments, with iOS the favorite among developers. Here are development tips, coding advice and other topics related to designing, creating, deploying and maintaining your app for Apple devices.

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Latest iOS News From Dice

You’ve Built Your App. Here’s How You Market It

Fiksu
It takes blood, sweat, and tears—or at least a whole lot of programming knowledge, late nights, and energy drinks—to build a good mobile app. With all the energy devoted to bringing something new into the world, however, it’s sometimes easy to forget that the world won’t see your creation unless you spend an equal effort in marketing it. Every so often, an app builder gets lucky, and their app goes “viral” (a good candidate for 2014’s most overused term) without… continue…

Here’s Why Apple Rejected Your iOS App

iOS Screen
After six years, do you think the number of submissions to the App Store has stayed level, climbed, or fallen? As demonstrated by this chart of the App Store’s metrics (hat tip to Pocket Gamer), the number of submissions per day continues to rise, likely driven by a combination of new apps and updates of existing apps. (There was also a surge over the summer as developers prepared for the launch of iOS 8, the latest version of Apple’s mobile… continue…

Is Apple’s Swift Worth Your Development Time?

Apple Swift
At the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in June, Apple surprised many developers when it announced Swift, a new programming language for iOS and OS X. For the past several months, more developers have been using Swift side-by-side with Objective-C, Cocoa, and Cocoa Touch to build apps, giving them a chance to see what Apple believes will serve as its future framework for all software produced by third-party developers. The big question on the minds of many in the industry, however,… continue…

Building Apps in Swift: Using Storyboards

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In our previous article on building apps with Apple’s Swift, we demonstrated how to use view controllers and views in code to craft a simple app. Before we begin with this next lesson, using storyboards to build an app in Swift, it’s worth revisiting that first piece. (The code that accompanies the piece is stored on SourceForge as “First Example.zip.”) Remember that view controllers in Swift manage two roles: they controls views on a page or part of a page,… continue…

iOS 8 Release Day: What You Need to Know

Apple iOS 8
It’s September, which means it’s time for Apple to release the latest version of its mobile operating system. If everything goes according to plan, everybody who owns an iPhone, iPod or iPad (or at least certain generations of those devices) will have the ability to download iOS 8 for free once it becomes available Sept. 17. In reality, the crush of people attempting to download the software will almost certainly lead to delays, device crashes, angry Tweets and Facebook postings,… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Boeing and BlackBerry Making a Self-Destructing Phone

posted 13 hours | from rambo tribble

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Rambo Tribble writes: It sounds like a Mission: Impossible scenario, but aerospace company Boeing is teaming with Canadian phone maker BlackBerry to produce an ultra-secure mobile phone that "self-destructs." The phone uses encryption on calls and is intended to serve the high-security needs of government and industry. As Blackberry CEO John Chen said, "We're pleased to announce that Boeing is collaborating with BlackBerry to provide a secure mobile solution for Android devices utilizing our BES 12 platform. That, by the way, is all they allow me to say."

No word yet if you'll need the services of the bomb squad when you go over your minutes.

T-Mobile To Pay $90M For Unauthorized Charges On Customers' Bills

posted 1 day | from itwbennett

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itwbennett writes T-Mobile US will pay at least $90 million to settle a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) suit that alleged it looked the other way while third parties charged T-Mobile subscribers for services they didn't want. The settlement is the second largest ever for so-called 'cramming,' following one that the FCC reached with AT&T in October. It came just two days after the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau sued Sprint for the same practice.

Researchers Discover SS7 Flaw, Allowing Total Access To Any Cell Phone, Anywhere

posted 2 days | from krakman

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krakman writes: Researchers discovered security flaws in SS7 that allow listening to private phone calls and intercepting text messages on a potentially massive scale – even when cellular networks are using the most advanced encryption now available. The flaws, to be reported at a hacker conference in Hamburg this month, are actually functions built into SS7 for other purposes – such as keeping calls connected as users speed down highways, switching from cell tower to cell tower – that hackers can repurpose for surveillance because of the lax security on the network. It is thought that these flaws were used for bugging German Chancellor Angela's Merkel's phone.

Those skilled at the housekeeping functions built into SS7 can locate callers anywhere in the world, listen to calls as they happen or record hundreds of encrypted calls and texts at a time for later decryption (Google translation of German original). There is also potential to defraud users and cellular carriers by using SS7 functions, the researchers say. This is another result of security being considered only after the fact, as opposed to being part of the initial design.

Review: The BlackBerry Classic Is One of the Best Phones of 2009

posted 2 days | from molly mchugh

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Molly McHugh writes When Apple launched the iPhone in 2007, and I owned a BlackBerry Curve. To me, my BlackBerry was close to being the absolute perfect smartphone. Today, BlackBerry revealed the Classic, a phone that is designed to make me—and everyone who owned a BlackBerry before the touchscreen revolution—remember how much we loved them.

Ask Slashdot: What Can I Really Do With a Smart Watch?

posted 2 days | from kwelch007

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kwelch007 writes I commonly work in a clean-room (CR.) As such, I commonly need access to my smart-phone for various reasons while inside the CR...but, I commonly keep it in my front pocket INSIDE my clean-suit. Therefore, to get my phone out of my pocket, I have to leave the room, get my phone out of my pocket, and because I have a one track mind, commonly leave it sitting on a table or something in the CR, so I then have to either have someone bring it to me, or suit back up and go get it myself...a real pain. I have been looking in to getting a 'Smart Watch' (I'm preferential to Android, but I know Apple has similar smart-watches.) I would use a smart-watch as a convenient, easy to transport and access method to access basic communications (email alerts, text, weather maps, etc.) The problem I'm finding while researching these devices is, I'm not finding many apps. Sure, they can look like a nice digital watch, but I can spend $10 for that...not the several hundred or whatever to buy a smart-watch. What are some apps I can get? (don't care about platform, don't care if they're free) I just want to know what's the best out there, and what it can do? I couldn't care less about it being a watch...we have these things called clocks all over the place. I need various sorts of data access. I don't care if it has to pair with my smart-phone using Bluetooth or whatever, and it won't have to be a 100% solution...it would be more of a convenience that is worth the several hundred dollars to me. My phone will never be more than 5 feet away, it's just inconvenient to physically access it. Further, I am also a developer...what is the best platform to develop for these wearable devices on, and why? Maybe I could make my own apps? Is it worth waiting for the next generation of smart-watches?

BT To Buy UK 4G Leader EE For £12.5 Billion

posted 5 days | from dw100

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DW100 writes: The UK mobile market looks set for a radical shake-up after BT confirmed it is now in final stage discussions to buy EE for £12.5bn. The move will see the telecom giant return to the mobile market for the first time in over a decade and make the company the leader in both fixed and mobile markets. Whether or not telecom regulator Ofcom will agree to such a deal, though, remains to be seen.

Ask Slashdot: Best Software To Revive PocketPCs With Windows Mobile 5-6?

posted 1 week | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes I recently got my hands on some amazing (at their time) pieces of technology, PocketPCs from the 2005-2007 era. All run with Windows Mobile 5 or 6, have storage SD cards (up to 4GB), 300 to 600 MHz ARM CPUs and 64-124MB of RAM/ROM. GPS chip is Sirf STAR III. I want to know what software you would install on them. Maybe a good Linux with GUI - if anyone can point on how to make it work. Creating some apps myself would be nice, but dunno where to start for WM5. One of my ideas was to use them as daily organizer / shopping list / memory games for people that don't own smartphones. So if anyone remembers such apps, I'd appreciate a reference. Tips or ideas for memory training or smart games are also highly welcomed. The power within these toys is simply unused and it's a shame!

Cardboard Hits Half a Million Mark, Gets an SDK

posted 1 week | from timothy

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PC Magazine reports (citing a blog post from project manager Andrew Nartker) that Google's Cardboard -- first introduced to some laughter -- is growing up, with a small but growing collection of compatible apps and a recently announced SDK. And while Cardboard itself is pretty low-tech (cardboard, rubber band, a magnet) and consequently cheap, the resulting VR experience is pretty good, which explains why more than 500,000 of them have now shipped.

Apple's iPod Classic Refuses To Die

posted 1 week | from nerval's lobster

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Nerval's Lobster writes A funny thing happened to the iPod Classic on its way to the dustbin of history: people seemed unwilling to actually give it up. Apple quietly removed the iPod Classic from its online storefront in early September, on the same day CEO Tim Cook revealed the latest iPhones and the upcoming Apple Watch. At 12 years old, the device was ancient by technology-industry standards, but its design was iconic, and a subset of diehard music fans seemed to appreciate its considerable storage capacity. At least some of those diehard fans are now paying four times the iPod Classic's original selling price for units still in the box. The blog 9to5Mac mentions Amazon selling some last-generation iPod Classics for $500 and above. Clearly, some people haven't gotten the memo that touch-screens and streaming music were supposed to be the way of the future.

In Iowa, a Phone App Could Serve As Driver's License

posted 1 week | from dubner

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New submitter dubner writes Simply hand the law enforcement officer your mobile phone. That's what you can do in Iowa rather than "digging through clutter in your glove compartment for an insurance card." And soon your driver's license will be available on your phone too, according to a story in the (Des Moines Register). Iowans will soon be able to use a mobile app on their smartphones as their official driver's license issued by the Iowa Department of Transportation. Some marvelous quotes in TFA: "The new app should be highly secure ... People will use a pin number for verification." And "Branstad (Iowa governor)... noted that even Iowa children are now working on digital development projects." A raft of excuses ("battery's dead") and security problems come to mind; how would you implement such a system?