iOS

A Dice Talent Community

iOS Dice Talent Community

iOS pretty much started the revolution of the Smart Device. It and Android are the two most popular development environments, with iOS the favorite among developers. Here are development tips, coding advice and other topics related to designing, creating, deploying and maintaining your app for Apple devices.

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Please note: This community is no longer being updated. Please check the Mobile Development Talent Community.

Latest iOS News From Dice

Mobile Developers Find Money in the Enterprise

Enterprise Apps
Mobile developers who want to make money should consider building enterprise apps: Those who target enterprise customers are twice as likely to earn real money as those going after consumers or professionals, according to a report from app and mobile researcher VisionMobile. The report, The State of the Developer Nation Q3 2014, says that more than two thirds of mobile app developers focus on consumers, 16 percent target the enterprise and 11 percent target professionals. The developers of enterprise apps… continue…

Amazon Launches Back-End Services to Aid Mobile Developers

Amazon Cognito
Amazon’s launched a series of services designed to support the back end of mobile apps, a move that some analysts say will reposition it as a top player in the space for Mobile Backend as a Service (MBaaS). The services, Amazon says, are designed to “to make it easier for developers to build, deploy, and scale mobile applications.” Find mobile development jobs here. One of them, Cognito, provides identity and data synchronization that lets developers authenticate users through popular public… continue…

Here’s Apple to Teach You About Swift

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As a company, Apple has a well-earned reputation for CIA-caliber secrecy. New products are developed under tight security, employees always refuse to comment on new projects and good luck trying to get a quote out of an executive if you’re a member of the press. With that in mind, the company’s latest move is a bit of a shocker: the debut of an official blog devoted to Swift, meant to provide “a behind-the-scenes look into the design of the Swift… continue…

3 Steps to Break Into Mobile Development

Mobile Devices
Michael Turner is a 23-year-old from Rochester, N.Y., who wants to get into mobile app development, though right now his skills are limited to HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Not long ago, he wrote to Dice asking for some tips on how to get started. To give him some guidance, we reached out to two mobile dev veterans: David Yang, Placement Coordinator and lead instructor at the Fullstack Academy of Code in New York, and Eric Schweitzer, a California-based Mac and… continue…

Facebook Has Lots of New F8 Toys for Developers

Facebook F8 Conference
At this year’s F8 conference, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that his company’s internal motto had shifted from “Move fast and break things” to “Move fast with stable infrastructure.” That new motto, while nowhere near as catchy as the old one, is meant to encapsulate Facebook as the social network matures into a tech behemoth with more than a billion users worldwide. The focus is no longer on speedy user growth; instead, it’s about encouraging third-party developers to build software… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

How the Internet of Things Could Aid Disaster Response

posted 39 mins | from jfruh

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jfruh writes While the Internet has made communications easier, that ease had made us very dependent on the Internet for communications — and, when disaster strikes, power and infrastructure outages tend to shut down those communications networks when we need them most. But now researchers are examining how the so-called "Internet of Things" — the proliferating array of Internet-communicating devices in our lives — can transmit emergency messages via ad-hoc networks even when the Internet backbone in a region is inoperable.

'Optical Fiber' Made Out of Thin Air

posted 12 hours | from dave knott

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Dave Knott writes: Scientists from the University of Maryland say they have turned thin air into an "optical fiber" that can transmit and amplify light signals without the need for any cables. As described in the research, this was accomplished by generating a laser with its light split into a ring of multiple beams forming a pipe. Very short and powerful pulses from the laser are used to heat the air molecules along the beam extremely quickly. Such rapid heating produces sound waves that take about a microsecond to converge to the center of the pipe, creating a high-density area surrounded by a low-density area left behind in the wake of the laser beams. The lower density region of air surrounding the center of the air waveguide has a lower refractive index, keeping the light focused, and allowing the higher-density region (with its correspondingly higher index of refraction) to act like an optical fiber. The findings, reported in the journal Optica, have applications in long range laser communications, high-resolution topographic mapping, air pollution and climate change research, and could also be used by the military to make laser weapons.

CNN iPhone App Sends iReporters' Passwords In the Clear

posted 16 hours | from chicksdaddy

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chicksdaddy (814965) writes The Security Ledger reports on newly published research from the firm zScaler that reveals CNN's iPhone application transmits user login session information in clear text. The security flaw could leave users of the application vulnerable to having their login credential snooped by malicious actors on the same network or connected to the same insecure wifi hotspot. That's particularly bad news if you're one of CNN's iReporters — citizen journalists — who use the app to upload photos, video and other text as they report on breaking news events. According to a zScaler analysis, CNN's app for iPhone exposes user credentials in the clear both during initial setup of the account and in subsequent mobile sessions. The iPad version of the CNN app is not affected, nor is the CNN mobile application for Android. A spokesman for CNN said the company had a fix ready and was working with Apple to have it approved and released to the iTunes AppStore.

Amazon Fire Phone Reviews: Solid But Overly Ambitious

posted 18 hours | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Amazon's Fire Phone launches later this week, and the reviews have started to come in. The hardware: "There's nothing terribly special about the Fire Phone's hardware, but there's very little to turn you off either." "The nice-looking IPS display in the Fire Phone gets bright enough for outdoor viewing, and it has nice viewing angles—a necessity for a phone that's meant to be tilted around and looked at from every which way." "An indistinct slab of glass and plastic, the Fire Phone looks more like a minimalist prototype than a finished product."

Software: "Firefly can recognize lots of things, but it's incredibly, hilariously inconsistent." "Firefly is the one Fire Phone feature you'll want on any phone you're currently using. Let's hope that it gets enough developer support that it isn't just a link to Amazon's storefronts." "First, and to be absolutely clear, Dynamic Perspective will impress you the first time you see it, and Amazon is pretty good at showing it off. ... But if there's some cool, useful functionality to be had from super-aggressive, super-accurate face tracking, the Fire Phone doesn't have it." Conclusion: "Smartphones are for work, for life. They're not toys, they're tools. Amazon doesn't understand that, and the Fire Phone doesn't reflect it."

EFF Releases Wireless Router Firmware For Open Access Points

posted 1 day | from klapaucjusz

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klapaucjusz writes: The EFF has released an experimental router firmware designed make it easy to deploy open (password-less) access points in a secure manner. The EFF's firmware is based on the CeroWRT fork of OpenWRT, but appears to remove some of its more advanced routing features. The EFF is asking for help to further develop the firmware. They want the open access point to co-exist on the same router as your typical private and secured access point. They want the owner to be able to share bandwidth, but with a cap, so guests don't degrade service for the owner. They're also looking to develop a network queueing, a minimalist web UI, and an auto-update mechanism. The EFF has also released the beta version of a plug-in called Privacy Badger for Firefox and Chrome that will prevent online advertisers from tracking you.

NVIDIA Launches Tegra K1-Based SHIELD Tablet, Wireless Controller

posted 2 days | from mojokid

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MojoKid (1002251) writes NVIDIA just officially announced the SHIELD Tablet (powered by their Tegra K1 SoC) and SHIELD wireless controller. As the SHIELD branding implies, the new SHIELD tablet and wireless controller builds upon the previously-released, Android-based SHIELD portable to bring a gaming-oriented tablet to consumers. The SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller are somewhat of mashup of the SHIELD portable and the Tegra Note 7, but featuring updated technology and better build materials. You could think of the SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller as an upgraded SHIELD portable gaming device, with the screen de-coupled from the controller. The device features NVIDIA's Tegra K1 SoC, paired to 2GB of RAM and an 8", full-HD IPS display, with a native resolution of 1920x1200. There are also a pair of 5MP cameras on the SHIELD Tablet (front and rear), 802.11a/b/g/n 2x2 MIMO WiFi configuration, GPS, a 9-axis motion sensor, and Bluetooth 4.0 LE. In addition to the WiFi-only version (which features 16GB of internal storage), NVIDIA has a 32GB version coming with LTE connectivity as well. NVIDIA will begin taking pre-orders for the SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller immediately.

AirMagnet Wi-Fi Security Tool Takes Aim At Drones

posted 2 days | from alphadogg

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alphadogg (971356) writes "In its quest to help enterprises seek out and neutralize all threats to their Wi-Fi networks, AirMagnet is now looking to the skies. In a free software update to its AirMagnet Enterprise product last week, the Wi-Fi security division of Fluke Networks added code specifically crafted to detect the Parrot AR Drone, a popular unmanned aerial vehicle that costs a few hundred dollars and can be controlled using a smartphone or tablet. Drones themselves don't pose any special threat to Wi-Fi networks, and AirMagnet isn't issuing air pistols to its customers to shoot them down. The reason the craft are dangerous is that they can be modified to act as rogue access points and sent into range of a victim's wireless network, potentially breaking into a network to steal data."

Why My LG Optimus Cellphone Is Worse Than It's Supposed To Be

posted 3 days | from samzenpus

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Bennett Haselton writes My LG Optimus F3Q was the lowest-end phone in the T-Mobile store, but a cheap phone is supposed to suck in specific ways that make you want to upgrade to a better model. This one is plagued with software bugs that have nothing to do with the cheap hardware, and thus lower one's confidence in the whole product line. Similar to the suckiness of the Stratosphere and Stratosphere 2 that I was subjected to before this one, the phone's shortcomings actually raise more interesting questions — about why the free-market system rewards companies for pulling off miracles at the hardware level, but not for fixing software bugs that should be easy to catch. Read below to see what Bennett has to say.

China Has More People Going Online With a Mobile Device Than a PC

posted 3 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader points out that even though China's internet adoption rate is the lowest it's been in 8 years, the number of people surfing the net from a mobile device has never been higher. "The number of China's internet users going online with a mobile device — such as a smartphone or tablet — has overtaken those doing so with a personal computer (PC) for the first time, said the official China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) on Monday. China's total number of internet users crept up 2.3 percent to 632 million by the end of June, from 618 million at the end of 2013, said CNNIC's internet development statistics report. Of those, 527 million — or 83 percent — went online via mobile. Those doing so with a PC made up 81 percent the total. China is the largest smartphone market in the world, and by 2018 is likely to account for nearly one-third of the expected 1.8 billion smartphones shipped that year, according to data firm IDC.

Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

posted 6 days | from droidjason1

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DroidJason1 writes Microsoft has attempted to compete in the small-screen tablet market with Windows 8.1 and Windows RT, but it looks like the growing adoption of small-screen Android tablets are just too much for Lenovo to handle. Lenovo has slammed the brakes on sales of small screen Windows tablets in the United States, citing a lack of interest from consumers. In fact, Lenovo has stopped selling the 8-inch ThinkPad 8 and the 8-inch Miix 2. Fortunately, these small-screen Windows tablets have seen some success in Brazil, China, and Japan, so Lenovo will focus on efforts there. Microsoft also recently scrapped plans for the rumored Surface Mini.