iOS

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iOS Dice Talent Community

iOS pretty much started the revolution of the Smart Device. It and Android are the two most popular development environments, with iOS the favorite among developers. Here are development tips, coding advice and other topics related to designing, creating, deploying and maintaining your app for Apple devices.

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Latest iOS News From Dice

Google, Facebook Battled for Mobile Crown in 2014

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Nielsen recently released its list of the top smartphone apps of 2014, and the results were utterly unsurprising, with the top 10 split almost entirely between the Facebook and Google app ecosystems. The “basic” Facebook app came in first place with 118 million users (a 15 percent increase over the year before), followed by Google Search with 90 million users, YouTube with 88 million users, Google Play with 84 million users, and Google Maps with 79 million users. For more… continue…

You’ve Built Your App. Here’s How You Market It

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It takes blood, sweat, and tears—or at least a whole lot of programming knowledge, late nights, and energy drinks—to build a good mobile app. With all the energy devoted to bringing something new into the world, however, it’s sometimes easy to forget that the world won’t see your creation unless you spend an equal effort in marketing it. Every so often, an app builder gets lucky, and their app goes “viral” (a good candidate for 2014’s most overused term) without… continue…

Here’s Why Apple Rejected Your iOS App

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After six years, do you think the number of submissions to the App Store has stayed level, climbed, or fallen? As demonstrated by this chart of the App Store’s metrics (hat tip to Pocket Gamer), the number of submissions per day continues to rise, likely driven by a combination of new apps and updates of existing apps. (There was also a surge over the summer as developers prepared for the launch of iOS 8, the latest version of Apple’s mobile… continue…

Is Apple’s Swift Worth Your Development Time?

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At the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in June, Apple surprised many developers when it announced Swift, a new programming language for iOS and OS X. For the past several months, more developers have been using Swift side-by-side with Objective-C, Cocoa, and Cocoa Touch to build apps, giving them a chance to see what Apple believes will serve as its future framework for all software produced by third-party developers. The big question on the minds of many in the industry, however,… continue…

Building Apps in Swift: Using Storyboards

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In our previous article on building apps with Apple’s Swift, we demonstrated how to use view controllers and views in code to craft a simple app. Before we begin with this next lesson, using storyboards to build an app in Swift, it’s worth revisiting that first piece. (The code that accompanies the piece is stored on SourceForge as “First Example.zip.”) Remember that view controllers in Swift manage two roles: they controls views on a page or part of a page,… continue…

Slashdot: News for Nerds

Patents Show Google Fi Was Envisioned Before the iPhone Was Released

posted 4 hours | from smaxp

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smaxp writes: Contrary to reports, Google didn't become a mobile carrier with the introduction of Google Fi. Google Fi was launched to prove that a network-of-networks serves smartphone users better than a single mobile carrier's network. Patents related to Google Fi, filed in early 2007, explain Google's vision – smartphones negotiate for and connect to the fastest network available. The patent and Google Fi share a common notion that the smartphone should connect to the fastest network available, not a single carrier's network that may not provide the best performance. It breaks the exclusive relationship between a smartphone and a single carrier. Meanwhile, a story at BostInno points out that Google's not the only one with a network-hopping hybrid approach to phone calls.

iOS WiFi Bug Allows Remote Reboot of All Devices In Area

posted 1 day | from bronscon

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New submitter BronsCon writes: A recently disclosed flaw in iOS 8 dubbed "No iOS Zone" allows an attacker to create a WiFi hot spot that will cause iOS devices to become unstable, crash, and reboot, even when in offline mode. Adi Sharabani and Yair Amit of Skycure are working with Apple for a fix; but, for now, the only workaround is to simply not be in range of such a malicious network.

Traffic App Waze To Alert L.A. Drivers of Kidnappings and Hit-and-Runs

posted 1 day | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Traffic-alert app Waze has announced a partnership with Los Angeles to share information on hit-and-runs and kidnappings taking place across the city, alongside traffic data and road closure updates. The deal forms part of a data-sharing agreement between L.A. authorities and the Google-owned tech startup detailed yesterday by the city's mayor Eric Garcetti. He assured that the data provided to the city by Waze would be "aggregated" and completely anonymous. According to the councillor the collaboration was mutually confirmed on Monday following a "very good meeting" between Waze and LAPD chief officer Charlie Beck. This move signals a considerable turn of events after Beck argued at the end of last year that the traffic alert app posed a danger to police due to its ability to track their location. The complaint followed the shooting of two police officers in New York after the shooter used the app to track his targets.

Wellness App Author Lied About Cancer Diagnosis

posted 1 day | from freshly exhumed

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Freshly Exhumed writes: Wellness advocate Belle Gibson, who translated her high profile as a cancer survivor into publishing success, has admitted her cancer diagnosis was not real. Ms Gibson, 23, who claimed to have healed terminal brain cancer by eating wholefoods, made the admission in an interview with the Australian Women's Weekly. The success of Gibson's book, The Whole Pantry, and her smartphone application, which advocates natural therapies, has been largely dependent on her high-profile as a cancer survivor. Sadly, we've seen this sort of behaviour before. It would seem that Belle Gibson has emulated Dr. Andrew Wakefield in knowingly decieving the public in ways that could possibly be dangerous to the health of believers.

Facebook's "Hello" Tells You Who's Calling Before You Pick Up

posted 2 days | from mark wilson

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Mark Wilson writes: When you receive a call you'll usually see the number of the caller, but this may not be helpful in identifying them before you decide whether to pick up. Facebook's answer to this problem is Hello. This new app comes from the Facebook Messenger team and aims to tell you more about the person getting in touch with you even if you don't have their number saved in your address book. Currently available for Android, the dialer app also allows for the blocking of calls from individuals.

Google Launches Project Fi Mobile Phone Service

posted 2 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Google unveiled today a new cell phone service called Project Fi. It offers the same basic functionality as traditional wireless carriers, such as voice, text and Internet access, but at a lower price than most common plans. From the article: "Google hopes to stand out by changing the way it charges customers. Typically, smartphone owners pay wireless carriers like AT&T and Verizon a bulk rate for a certain amount of data. Google says it will let customers pay for only what data they use on their phones, from doing things like making calls, listening to music and using apps, potentially saving them significant amounts of money. For now, the program is invite-only and will only be available on Google's Nexus 6 smartphone."

Intel 'Compute Stick' PC-Over-HDMI Dongle Launched, Tested

posted 2 days | from mojokid

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MojoKid writes: Intel has officially announced the availability of their Compute Stick HDMI dongle, and has lifted the embargo on early tests with the device. The Compute Stick is essentially a fully-functional, low-power, Atom-based system with memory, storage, and an OS, crammed into a dongle about 10cm long. There will initially be two compute sticks made available: one running Windows (model STCK1A32WFC) and another running Ubuntu (model STCK1A8LFC). The Windows 8.1 version of the Compute Stick is packing an Intel Atom Z3735F processor, with a single-channel of 2GB of DDR3L-1333 RAM and 32GB of internal storage, though out of the box only 19.2GB is usable. The Ubuntu version of the Compute Stick has as a similar CPU, but is packing only 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage. All sticks have USB and MicroSD expansion capability. It doesn't burn through any benchmarks, but for multi-media playback, basic computing tasks, web browsing, HD video, or remote access, the Compute Stick has enough muscle to get the job done, and it's cheap, too: $99 — $149.

Networking Library Bug Breaks HTTPS In ~1,500 iOS Apps

posted 3 days | from mrflash818

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mrflash818 writes: A new report from analytics service SourceDNA found that roughly 1,500 iOS apps (with about 2 million total installs) contain a vulnerability that cripples HTTPS and makes man-in-the-middle attacks against those apps easy to pull off. "The weakness is the result of a bug in an older version of the AFNetworking, an open-source code library that allows developers to drop networking capabilities into their apps. Although AFNetworking maintainers fixed the flaw three weeks ago with the release of version 2.5.2, at least 1,500 iOS apps remain vulnerable because they still use version 2.5.1. That version became available in January and introduced the HTTPS-crippling flaw."

Wi-Fi Attack Breaks iPhones By Locking Them Into an Endless Loop

posted 3 days | from anonymous coward

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An anonymous reader writes: Researchers from Skycure demonstrated a novel attack at the RSA 2015 conference that affects iPhones and other iOS devices. The attack, which takes advantage of new and previously announced vulnerabilities, locks iPhones into a never-ending reboot cycle effectively rendering them useless. Skycure CEO Adi Sharabani explained that this attack began when Skycure researchers bought a new router and were messing around with its network settings. In doing so, they discovered a particular configuration that caused apps in iPhones connected to that router to crash whenever they launched.

'Mobilegeddon': Google To Punish Mobile-Hostile Sites Starting Today

posted 3 days | from jfruh

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jfruh writes: Google has announced that it will be adding mobile-friendliness to the list of factors that will get a site bumped up in search rankings. Sites that have no mobile versions — which includes sites owned by Wikipedia, the BBC and the European Union — will find themselves with lower Google search placement, starting today.