Programming

News, information and advice on writing the best code possible.

A NoSQL Alternative: Disk Folders

Folder
One of the joys of programming is that there are often many different ways to accomplish the same goal. That comes in handy when you’re not feeling too confident about a given solution. Consider this problem I recently faced. I was choosing between a relational database or NoSQL for a game server I was working on. Whichever I chose would contain a couple dozen tables and would need to support up to 100,000 users. My real-time needs were very modest,… continue…

Employers Can’t Find Enough Scala Talent

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Some have wondered whether the recent release of Java 8 could be bad news for Scala, which gained fans with its functional programming capabilities on the Java Virtual Machine. Scala’s creator Martin Odersky doesn’t believe it. He’s said the release will bring the Scala and Java communities closer together. And Typesafe, the company Odersky created to support and promote Scala, is touting it as good news for all. Click here to find Scala jobs. “Typesafe is excited to see Java… continue…

An Employee’s Guide to Open Source Contributions

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Creating your own project or otherwise contributing to open source is the kind of thing that can help you show off your skills to potential employers. Beyond that, many programmers contribute because they enjoy the work involved or use it to develop new skills. But it’s worth bearing in mind that, depending on your company’s attitude, there can be job-related pitfalls. Here are some things to look out for. Some businesses feel that anything created by their employees — even… continue…

5 Techniques to Increase Your Programming Productivity

Women working at computer
Every programmer has his or her techniques for being more productive and writing more code. Having been on a three month contract where I wrote and debugged 5,000 lines of code in two weeks, I thought I’d share some of mine. Get Into the Zone It’s not always easy to get into the zone and it often takes about an hour to get there. Research suggests that after every interruption, it takes at least 30 minutes to get back into… continue…

What the Next 18 Months Hold for Software Careers

Tech Forecast
It’s easy to put your head down and focus on the work that you have to do today. To think about the job you’re doing now. To think about the technology you know already. To understand the team structure you’re currently in. That’s what’s now. But what’s next? Let’s take a walk through the next 18 months and see where engineering is going. Focus on Learning What’s Going On: Hiring managers have figured out that tomorrow’s skills won’t be today’s… continue…

Amazon’s Closed Approach to Open Source Costs It Talent

Declinced Job Offer
Amazon’s unwillingness to contribute to the open source projects it relies on is costing it potential talent as some tech professionals avoid the company, says the Register. Insiders describe Amazon as a “black hole” where improvements and fixes for open-source software are kept close to the vest, a policy that comes “right from the top.” Amazon contributes far less software code and research papers to open source projects than either Microsoft or Google, its main rivals. The secrecy goes so… continue…

How Reactive Can Beat Conventional Procedural Programming

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In a post on Slashdot, Val Huber, CTO at Espresso Logic in Santa Clara, Calif., did a comparison of Reactive Programming to Java with Hibernate and MySQL triggers using a real-life business example. In the test, Reactive Programming surpassed conventional procedural programming models with a faster time to market, reduced maintenance, better quality and a higher level of transparency. Using a simple scenario involving customers with purchase orders consisting of line items, Huber compared what it takes to implement business… continue…

Generating Not-So-Random Numbers With Java’s Random Class

Dice Snake Eyes
All programming languages have random number generator classes or libraries, which produce sequences of random numbers. Those sequences are similar to pi in that they run on forever (well, sort of). As Harold explains to a class of bored teenagers in this Person of Interest clip, because pi runs forever (though so far only 10 trillion digits have been computed) every number or word that exists can be found within it. The same can be said of sequences of random… continue…