Susan Hall

Susan Hall is an accomplished writer and editor living in Louisville, Ky., where they like horses – a lot. Susan boasts some affection for horses, but more for dogs. She has written on a broad range topics from Olympic marathoners to the use of Twitter in the corporate jungle. Born of the print era, she worked at metro dailies such as The Dallas Times Herald, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Seattle Times and USA Today. The latter two even still exist. She fled the ink domain and became a member of the MSNBC.com launch team. From there it’s been a giddy ride of project management, research, interviewing, writing and editing in the IT realm. When not working, she and her Cocker Spaniel, Charlie, compete in AKC agility events.

Employers Can’t Find Enough Scala Talent

Scala Thumbnail
Some have wondered whether the recent release of Java 8 could be bad news for Scala, which gained fans with its functional programming capabilities on the Java Virtual Machine. Scala’s creator Martin Odersky doesn’t believe it. He’s said the release will bring the Scala and Java communities closer together. And Typesafe, the company Odersky created to support and promote Scala, is touting it as good news for all. Click here to find Scala jobs. “Typesafe is excited to see Java… continue…

Can Hacker Schools Provide the Training You Need?

Posted In Looking in Tech
Programming Training Iron Yard
An alternative is rising for people who want to develop new technical skills: Hacker schools, which are billed as quick, cheap alternatives to traditional educational approaches. The schools are cropping up across the country, especially in tech-heavy areas like San Francisco, New York and Boston. They’re not cheap, though. A program at the Iron Yard, based in South Carolina, takes three months and costs $9,000. A two-month program at Atlanta’s Tech Talent South runs $6,250 for full-time students and $4,250… continue…

Amazon’s Hiring is Just One Sign of Retail’s Tech Focus

Posted In Looking in Tech
Sale Sign
Amazon’s IT recruitment efforts in 2013 dramatically outpaced those of all of its competitors, according to a report published on the industry website Retail Information Systems News. During the year, the company posted about 17,000 tech jobs, more than 57 percent of all postings among the top 10. That’s a lot of postings, and we should note the report didn’t provide a definition for what jobs it considers “tech” or how it counted the ads. Still, the number is an… continue…

3 Requirements for Jobs in Software QA

Posted In Looking in Tech
Testing Code
The software industry’s evolution is changing the landscape of software QA. Mobile applications, new approaches to development and automation are all having an impact. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts strong growth in positions for software QA engineers, forecasting the creation of some 100,000 new positions through 2022. Today, the average salary in software QA is $75,444, according to the most recent Dice Salary Survey. Click here to find Software QA jobs. Many of those new jobs are bound to… continue…

Cloud Vendors Desperate for OpenStack Skills

OpenStack Logo
Learning about OpenStack is the surest way to get onto the cutting edge of cloud infrastructure, according to Jason Baker in a post at opensource.com. “Investing your time in learning OpenStack pays off,” Baker writes. The dramatic growth of the cloud has created thousands of jobs, with demand for OpenStack skills among the most pressing. According to Rackspace, “OpenStack outpaces other cloud infrastructure jobs considerably,” Baker writes. And since the hosting company conducted its survey some 18 months ago, the… continue…

How Tech Jobs Have Changed in 15 Years

Posted In Looking in Tech
1997 Computer Job
A comparison of tech jobs in 1997 and 2012 shows an interesting evolution. Think about the jobs that didn’t exist way back when, or at least not by their current names: cloud architect, mobile application developer, social media specialist. As part of its effort to mark the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web’s creation, the Pew Research Center has taken a stab at analyzing the Web’s impact on employment. Pew’s analysis shows that some categories, such as software developer,… continue…

Complex Requirements Pressure Demand for Data Scientists

Posted In Looking in Tech
Data
Data scientists are the people who crunch the data that an increasing number of companies, government agencies and other organizations collect from a range of sources, using mathematical models to analyze it and create narratives or visualizations to explain what it means, then suggest how to use it to make decisions. Beyond that, there’s not a lot of consensus on exactly what a “data scientist” is. Half Analytics, Half ‘Counting Things’ Former bit.ly chief scientist Hilary Mason, now at venture… continue…

Headspring Systems Seeks 100 App Developers

Posted In Looking in Tech
Headspring Systems Logo
Austin, Texas-based enterprise software development firm Headspring Systems plans to hire 100 app developers by the end of the year, with most of the hires based in Dallas, where it’s opening a new office. The company nearly tripled its headcount last year and expanded to Houston. It plans a Chicago office in 2015. The company focuses on custom application development, business intelligence and systems integration. In February, it launched a mobile division. Opening in May, the Dallas office will hire… continue…

F# Dramatically Gains in Popularity

F# Logo
The Microsoft-backed F# functional programming language is quickly gaining popularity, according to the Tiobe Programming Community Index. Ranked No. 69 on the index a year ago, F# has soared to the No. 12 spot this month and is headed for the top 10. Microsoft calls F# “simple and pragmatic” and says it has “particular strengths in data-oriented programming, parallel I/O programming, parallel CPU programming, scripting, and algorithmic development.” Functional-first programming languages are particularly suited to analytical work such as calculation… continue…

IBM ‘Workforce Rebalancing’ Includes Plenty of Hiring

Posted In Looking in Tech
Hiring
Despite layoffs that could affect up to 13,000 people, IBM continues to hire at its usual rate. The company has more than 3,000 open jobs. They include nearly 600 positions in software development and support, more than 1,300 IT specialists in areas such as infrastructure, security and middleware, and 44 positions in hardware development and support. It’s looking for 63 database administrators and more than 120 people in server support and services. Big Blue said: IBM is positioning itself to… continue…