5 Programming Languages Marked for Death

Posted In Looking in Tech
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As developers embrace new programming languages, older languages can go one of two ways: stay in use, despite fading popularity, or die out completely. We predict the following languages will likely die: Perl There was a time when everyone seemingly programmed in Perl. But for those of us who used the language regularly, there was something about it that didn’t seem right. One programmer I knew called it a “piecemeal” language, because it seemed as if the creators had just… continue…

Unpopular Programming Languages That Are Still Lucrative

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In a previous article, I discussed the best programming languages to learn over the next year. Most of those were popular languages such as C#, JavaScript, PHP, and Swift. (I also did a follow-up that sang the virtues of Objective-C and Python.) But that’s not the final story on languages: Programmers can also benefit from learning other, less popular languages that could end up paying off big—provided the programmers who pursue them play their proverbial cards right. And as with… continue…

Are Python and Objective-C Worth Learning?

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Last week’s article on the five programming languages you’ll need next year (and beyond) didn’t include two important languages: Python and Objective-C. Python’s exclusion sparked a passionate response from some readers, to say the least, and led us to craft a follow-up to emphasize Python’s importance to the programming world. Python is mature (the first version, created by a computer scientist named Guido van Rossum, was released in 1991). Google, where van Rossum worked for several years, has embraced Python… continue…

5 Programming Languages You’ll Need Next Year (and Beyond)

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We’ve reached a bit of a turning point in the world of programming. Ten years ago, programmers were moving into dynamic languages. To many of us, those languages seemed like a bit of a fad, even if they made programming easier. But those languages endured, and today we’re developing software with a combination of old and new tools. That creates the potential for confusion: What languages are best to learn if you want to stay employed? Before diving into which… continue…

PHP vs. .NET: Which Should You Learn?

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If you’re a software developer, there simply isn’t enough time in the world to learn every single technology, language and platform you might need for work, or to land a better job; at some point, you’re going to have to decide in what direction you want to expand your knowledge base. The choices you make in that regard will have a huge impact on your life. If you devote too much time to learning a technology that’s on the verge… continue…

Google’s Android Studio vs. Eclipse: Which Fits Your Needs?

Comparing Eclipse and its Google-made Google Plugin with Google’s own Android Studio. continue…

Cloudinary vs. Blitline: Cloud-Image Services Compared

As Web applications grow in number and capability, storing large amounts of images can quickly become a problem. continue…

Is GCC 4.8 a Quirky Mess?

Users have reported problems upgrading from GCC 4.7 to 4.8. Has the underlying code generation changed? continue…

Comparing C++ Compilers’ Parallel-Programming Performance

Intel and g++ compilers give you plenty of options for generating vectorized code. But how well does each platform actually perform? continue…

Speed Test 2: Comparing C++ Compilers on Windows

Posted In Cloud
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Previously we compared a few C++ compilers on Linux; this time we’re going to perform a similar set of tests for Windows. continue…