Don Willmott

Don Willmott reports on the Internet, technology, and consumer electronics for a wide variety of publications and Web sites. He was Yahoo! Internet Life’s Technology Editor and also spent 14 years at PC Magazine in a variety of editorial positions. Willmott is the author of the book “PC Magazine Best of the Web” (Wiley, 2004). He lives in New York City.

Silicon Alley Powering New York City Job Market

Posted In Looking in Tech
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What’s New This Quarter How many tech jobs have been created in New York in the past decade? According to a report from HR&A Advisors, roughly 300,000 employees either work at tech firms, or else perform a tech-related role at a non-tech firm—eclipsing the tech presence in San Francisco. New York’s tech sector is almost as large as the city’s other traditional sectors of healthcare, legal, finance, and retail. That hasn’t stopped the finance sector from chipping away at its… continue…

D.C.’s Aging Tech Workforce Needs Millennials

Posted In Looking in Tech
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In September, Google executive Megan Smith became the third Federal Chief Technology Officer—an appointment that qualified as D.C.’s biggest hiring news of late. “It’s not exclusively focused on IT,” Smith wrote in a statement about her new role. “It’s focused on all the technology opportunity ahead for our country and for ourselves. So, it could be energy-related or basic science-related or innovations in biology—all those areas.” Click here to find a tech job in Washington D.C. Smith also noted that there… continue…

Austin Seems Poised for Even More Tech Growth

Posted In Looking in Tech
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What’s New This Quarter Everyone likes Austin—including Forbes, which ranked the city second on its recent list of Best U.S. Cities for Future Job Growth. Forbes projects the annual job growth at 4.1 percent, which mirrors the unemployment rate of 4.1 percent. The Austin Technology Council predicts that 9,000 new tech jobs will be created in the city by 2017. Dice also picked up on this positive trend, crunching the numbers in August to find that Texas as a whole… continue…

Silicon Valley Recruiters See Wide Demand for Tech Skills

Silicon Valley Sign
What’s New This Quarter What does the Silicon Valley workforce really look like? If Google, Yahoo and Facebook are indication, it’s very white and male. In May, Google revealed that only 2 percent of its workforce is black, 3 percent Hispanic, and 30 percent Asian; 30 percent is female. “Simply put, Google is not where we want to be when it comes to diversity,” Senior Vice President Laszlo Bock said in a blog post. The census, which covered 26,600 Google… continue…

Cloud Efforts Drive Hiring in Seattle

Posted In Looking in Tech
Seattle Skyline
In June, the New York Times affirmed what the Puget Sound tech community already knew: Cloud technology is turning out to be Seattle’s hottest commodity. “It’s like Detroit used to be for car companies,” Bill Hilf, Hewlett-Packard’s vice president of cloud product management, told the newspaper. “The galactic players are here, and they are creating lots of little companies.” Hilf, a Microsoft alum, is helping to launch HP’s new HP Helion cloud computing initiative in Seattle, with $1 billion of… continue…

Demand ‘Far Outweighs’ Raleigh’s Available Tech Talent

Posted In Looking in Tech
Raleigh
What’s New This Quarter In April, MetLife executives told the Raleigh, N.C., area’s Triangle Business Journal that their local expansion plans are proceeding quickly. The company is hiring ahead of projections for its new global technology and operations hub and is receiving 1,000 resumes a week. To date, about one third of the 1,200 jobs MetLife promised to create at the new campus in Cary have been filled. Lenovo’s activities in the area are also growing as it absorbs its… continue…

New York City Employers See Tech Hiring Through Year’s End

Posted In Looking in Tech
New York City
What’s New This Quarter During the spring, the New York Times surveyed the city’s tech scene and came to mixed conclusions. While excitement abounds, “The hype has definitely died down,” said David Tisch, a co-founder of Techstars, a local startup. “It’s harder to point to one thing and say, ‘that’s New York tech.’ ” Even so, the Times noted, the amount of venture, angel and private equity money invested in New York rose dramatically between 2009 and 2013, to $3… continue…

D.C. Is a Tech Candidate’s Market

Posted In Looking in Tech
D.C.
What’s New This Quarter The story remains the same: The federal government simply can’t find enough cybersecurity professionals to lock down everything that needs to be locked down, and security watchers say that we must make cybersecurity a national imperative much like aerospace technology, nuclear science and biotechnology have been in the past. Sam Visner, vice president and general manager of CSC Global Security, told NextGov that not enough is being done to make current cybersecurity efforts effective. “We have… continue…

Austin’s Top Tech Candidates Get Hired Quickly

Posted In Looking in Tech
Austin Skyline
What’s New This Quarter Nine months after taking Dell private, CEO Michael Dell is feeling buoyant that he no longer has to kowtow to Wall Street on a quarterly basis. His company is still the largest private employer in Central Texas, with about 14,000 workers in the Austin area, and it’s hoping to gain ground in the emerging connected-world category of the “Internet of Things.” When it comes to having higher-than-average numbers of women in the tech workforce, Austin ranks… continue…

Raleigh Employers Look for Software Developers

Posted In Looking in Tech
Raleigh
What’s New This Quarter It’s been a tumultuous time for Research Triangle-based employees of both Lenovo and IBM as the two companies work to forge a future that will be profitable for both. After a seventh straight quarterly sales decline, IBM expected to post about $1 billion in “workforce-rebalancing” costs during the first quarter. (A similar plan in 2013 led to some 3,300 layoffs in North America, including hundreds in North Carolina.) Lee Conrad, national coordinator for the employee organization… continue…