Dino Londis

Dino Londis is an application management engineer at a Manhattan law firm. He's a member of a team responsible for securing and maintaining the desktop. Before this, he worked as a network administrator, tier three support engineer, and helpdesk technician, all in the curious world of law firms. Dino also writes a consumerization column for BYTE.

Large Companies Hire Non-Techs for Tech Jobs

Posted In Looking in Tech
LiberalArts1
Large companies are hiring college graduates for IT positions with little or no IT training or experience. National Public Radio reports that companies like Siemens and Hewlett Packard are looking for graduates with a liberal arts education. Could it be it’s the end to specialization? Not likely. But it does point to an emerging trend where IT departments will work closer with the business units. Today, tech’s who know some Java with a degree in accounting may have an advantage over… continue…

“Siri, What Does My Data Look Like Today?”

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There is an explosive growth in data demand from the iPhone 4S that is in part related to the personal “virtual assistant,” Siri, reveals a study by Arieso, a British technology company that specializes in bandwidth optimization. According the study, “iPhone 4S users are the ‘hungriest’ data consumers, demanding twice as much data as iPhone 4 users and three times as much as iPhone 3G users.” And just two weeks after the 4S release, Ars Technica noticed a jump in data… continue…

Occupy Wall Street: Tech Experience Without Pay

Posted In Looking in Tech
OWS Graphic
Occupy Wall Street can offer you a bunch of tech experience, fast. As long as you’ll volunteer. This is a team (in the true sense of the word) that’s building new platforms from the ground up. There is no pay, you’ll work 16-hour days and be given some pretty great responsibility from day one, but you’ll come away with a wealth of knowledge. You can work from home if you like. “We are quite busy,” Jake DeGroot, a tech op… continue…

Hugging It Out, in Your Inbox

HugShirt
The Internet was designed for two reasons: to decentralize communications in the event of a thermonuclear war and to send hugs remotely. That latter vision has finally been realized by the inventors of the HugShirt. The HugShirt from CuteCircuit incorporates sensors in the hugger’s shirt that track the heart rate and even skin temperature then transmits the data via Bluetooth to your smartphone, which sends it to the recipient’s phone. During a private moment, the recipient can activate the hug… continue…

The 25 Most Common Passwords on the Internet Are…

The single most popular password is “password.” The 18th most popular is “passw0rd.” Notice the zero? So do hackers. Splashdata has compiled a list of the most used passwords from files containing millions of stolen passwords posted by hackers online. Why are stolen passwords online? Cyber Monday Shoppers, take note: Credentials are compromised in a two-step process. The first is through some bit of malware installed on your computer that will log each keystroke as you type it and transmit… continue…

Facebook Hacking Creates IT Dilemma for the Enterprise

Facebook HQ
Hackers who posted pornography on Facebook may not have had much in mid beyond embarrassing the social network and its users. A spokesman for the site says it’s identified the hackers but isn’t revealing their names.  It also hasn’t revealed how the hack was performed. Security blog Naked Security says it was performed through a known vulnerability in a specific browser requiring the user to post a URL in the address bar. A combination of social engineering and click-jacking allows images… continue…

More on How Gen Y Will Drive IT Crazy

Posted In Working in Tech
College graduates entering the workforce are putting greater pressure on IT departments to allow them to use their own mobile devices, unfettered Internet access and wide-open social networks. These are so important that they’re willing to accept less pay to get them. An online survey conducted by Cisco found that one third of the 1,400 respondents would sacrifice pay for an environment where they can use their own devices. Cisco predicts these increasing demands will disrupt IT departments, which are… continue…

ChromeOS Inches Closer to the Enterprise

Google Chrome Logo
Chromebook users are double-handicapped. If their connection to the Internet breaks they can’t work at all, and once they’re connected they’re limited to the Google desktop. Chromebooks run ChromeOS, Google’s other operating system. What Android is to iOS, ChromeOS is to Windows — or so Google would like it. Google advertises Chromebook to students as a cheap alternative to laptops running Windows or OS X. You can lease one for as little as $20 a month, where a comparable laptop… continue…

Alternative Ways to Charge Your iPhone

Posted In Living in Tech
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iOS 5 and its affect it on battery life reminds is highlighting just how importance mobile devices have absolute necessities. In case you had any doubt. Caught without smartphone juice at the wrong time could cost you a relationship, a job or even your life. But before you run out to buy extra chargers, here are six devices that will keep your phone charged without plugging it into the wall. Crank One minute of cranking is good for one minute… continue…

IOS 5 Users Offer Power Drain Solutions

Posted In Living in Tech
Power Plant
iPhone users are discovering that the new iOS 5 is a power hog. Those who’ve installed the OS onto their iPhone 4 or 4S have noticed that battery life is reduced by as much as 30 percent. There’s much speculation in the blogosphere about the cause (Siri, more apps using location-based services, older apps not written for the new environment to name just a few). And as fast as iPhone users have coalesced with stories about the problem, many have… continue…