Mark Feffer

Mark Feffer writes about jobs and technology. He started as a videotape editor back when there was videotape to edit, then joined the news desk at Dow Jones News/Retrieval, the company's first online product. He produced The Wall Street Journal's first multimedia CD-ROMs and published his novel, "September," in 2006. He lives in Pennsylvania with his wife, their fierce terrier, and a schnauzer who wonders why she ever left California. He's a member of the Project Management Institute.

Samsung Plans Hiring for San Jose R&D Center

Samsung's San Jose R&D Center
Samsung’s planning to do a lot of hiring in Silicon Valley as it prepares to open its new $300 million R&D Center in San Jose, by the summer of 2015. Indeed, the local talent pool is one of the reasons the company decided to locate the center there. “Samsung strategically determined the best pool of talent in the U.S. would be in the Bay Area,” Bob Brennan, senior vice president of its Memory System Application Lab, told Business Insider. “We… continue…

Why Tech Professionals Need to Be Good Story Tellers

Posted In Looking in Tech
Campfire
As a tech professional, how important is it for you to tell a good story? Lonne Jaffe, CEO of Woodcliff Lake, N.J.-based enterprise software provider Syncsort, says the ability can make a big difference in the course of your career. In fact, he told Business Insider he believes it’s especially important in technology, where things can be “very complex, and sometimes people find technical details to be somewhat boring.” We’ve said before that the ability to communicate is a critical… continue…

What Weird Al Sees May Surprise You

Posted In Living in Tech
Weird Al
Some might say that nothing demonstrates the power of social media more than Weird Al Yankovic’s album “Mandatory Fun” hitting the top of Billboard’s chart. But that would be cynical. After all, a lot of work goes into making goofy things great. The folks at the Verge put together this video featuring excerpts from eight of Weird Al’s older parodies, synced up with the work that inspired him. It’s cool to see how well they fit together. If nothing else,… continue…

More Tech Jobs Seen in Non-Tech Industries

Posted In Looking in Tech
Shopping
Over the next five years, most of the growth in technology jobs will be seen in companies whose focus lies in another area, like manufacturing, automotive, healthcare or retail. And the increased use of technology in those sectors portends another change in the IT job market: Jobs will spread into geographic regions not currently known as tech centers. All of that comes from an analysis conducted by CEB, a business advisory company based in Arlington, Va. To arrive at its… continue…

Twitter, Pinterest Release Diversity Numbers

Twitter Diversity July 2014
Twitter and Pinterest have become the latest brand-name tech companies to unveil gender and ethnic portraits of their workforce. The story they tell is pretty much the same as what we’ve seen in the previously released numbers of Facebook, Google and Yahoo. Overall, 30 percent of Twitter’s employees are women. However, the number shrinks to 10 percent when you look at the company’s tech team and 21 percent when you look at its leadership. In terms of ethnicity, 59 percent… continue…

Company Finds Real Advantages in Pay Transparency

Posted In Looking in Tech
Transparent Calculator
What happens when a company puts all of its salary information out in the open—yours, mine, the CEO’s, everyone’s? Apparently, at least in the experience of the New York City analytics startup SumAll, better communication between staff and management, and not very much drama. SumAll, which has 40 employees, has shared pay information since its early days, according to Business Insider. Founder and CEO Dane Atkinson worked with his first employees to set the salary of each job. As the… continue…

CIOs: Current Skills Key for First-Time Job Seekers

Posted In Looking in Tech
Graduates
What’s the secret to a successful IT career? To 50 percent of the CIOs surveyed by Robert Half Technology, the answer for recent graduates is learning new skills and staying current in the field. Seventeen percent said they’d tell first-time job seekers to take any opportunity that will help them get a foot in the door with an employer. When asked to identify the most important piece of advice they could give new graduates, the CIOs responded: Keep learning new… continue…

Healthcare IT Consultants Happier Than Full-Timers

Health IT
Consultants involved in implementing healthcare IT solutions are generally happier with their work than their full-time counterparts, according to a survey by Atlanta-based staffing firm Healthcare IT Leaders. More than three quarters—77 percent—of the consultants said they were either “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with their jobs, the survey found. That compares to 64 percent of full-time healthcare IT employees. To put the numbers in context, other surveys have found that 72 percent of workers across all industries report similar… continue…

Mobile Developers Find Money in the Enterprise

Enterprise Apps
Mobile developers who want to make money should consider building enterprise apps: Those who target enterprise customers are twice as likely to earn real money as those going after consumers or professionals, according to a report from app and mobile researcher VisionMobile. The report, The State of the Developer Nation Q3 2014, says that more than two thirds of mobile app developers focus on consumers, 16 percent target the enterprise and 11 percent target professionals. The developers of enterprise apps… continue…

Is There a Future in Programming D?

D Programming Language Thumbnail
Over at HTML5Report.com, Steve Anderson is wondering if D is the next big programming language. D took form when Walter Bright and Andrei Alexandrescu combined their efforts to develop a new language back in 2005. The result, says Anderson, offers some “very exciting” possibilities, and he notes that the ad-tech firm Sociomantic Labs, recently acquired by Tesco for $200 million, used D to build its online system. Making things more interesting is another online company’s interest in D: Facebook. Click… continue…