Mark Feffer

Mark Feffer is the Managing Editor of Dice. He started as a videotape editor back when there was videotape to edit, then joined the news desk at Dow Jones News/Retrieval, the company's first online product. He produced The Wall Street Journal's first multimedia CD-ROMs and published his novel, "September," in 2006. He lives in Pennsylvania with his wife, their fierce terrier, and a schnauzer who wonders why she ever left California. He's a member of the Project Management Institute.

Avoid This Fatal Error on Your Resume

Posted In Looking in Tech
Made a Mistake
  Tip of the Day Grammatical errors and typos are always high on the list of fatal resume flaws. But there’s actually a worse one, the most fatal of the fatal: Rambling and incoherent writing. In fact, while reviewers are often willing to overlook an occasional spelling error, outdated technology references or even a brief, unexplained employment gap, a resume that fails to succinctly convey who you are and what you do is going to be deleted, no matter how… continue…

Riot Games Will Pay You $25,000 to Quit

Posted In Looking in Tech
Exit Sign
Admitting mistakes is never easy. Nor is quitting. But Riot Games wants to make it easier for new employees to leave if they decide their new job just wasn’t meant to be. Last week, the company announced Queue Dodge, a program that allows any North American employee to leave the company within their first 60 days, taking with them 10 percent of their salary up to $25,000. The idea behind the approach is two-fold: Riot sees it as a way… continue…

Create a Strong Open to Your Cover Letter

Posted In Looking in Tech
Laptop Worker
  Tip of the Day We’ve talked before about how cover letters need to be concise and focused. Every paragraph needs to count. Your first paragraph is your introduction. It’s where you create a strong impression by introducing yourself, your qualifications and your interest in the position. Include your years of experience and last relevant job title, and be sure to mention the job and company you’re applying to by name. Also, bear in mind that numbers stand out, so… continue…

‘NanoDegrees’ Offer Entry-Level, Job-Specific Credentials

Working Online
AT&T and the online education company Udacity have unveiled a “NanoDegree” program designed to teach the basic programming skills necessary to qualify for entry-level technology jobs. The program costs $200 a month and can be completed by a working student in six months to a year, without their having to take time off. Starting this fall, courses will be offered in front- and back-end Web development, iOS development and data analysis. More subjects—including Android development—are on the horizon. AT&T says… continue…

‘Where Else Are You Interviewing?’

Posted In Looking in Tech
Quizzical Guy
  Tip of the Day One of these days, an interviewer is going to ask what other employers you’re talking to. There’s not really a graceful way around answering, so take the question head on and provide just enough information to satisfy their curiosity without hurting your chances. One way to do this is by describing the companies without using their names, or describing where you are in the hiring process. For example, say, “I’ve interviewed with a business intelligence… continue…

Don’t Rely on Social Networking Alone

Posted In Looking in Tech
group of business people networking thumbnail
Tip of the Day For your networking efforts to be effective, they have to take place in the real world. Put another way, you can’t build relationships by hiding in your office or relying on social media. Meaningful relationships are built face-to-face, and it’s from those meaningful relationships that your network derives its value. Although social media can help you identify contacts and share status updates, you need face time to get to know people and develop trust. Go to… continue…

Keep Your Cover Letter Focused

Posted In Looking in Tech
Typewriter
Tip of the Day Your cover letter provides an opportunity for you to pitch your experience and skills, but you have to get your message across quickly. If your letter’s too long, reviewers can be put off before they even start reading. So focus on its mission: to get reviewers to read your resume. Be sure to tailor your letter to the company and job you’re applying for–reviewers will easily spot something that’s generic. Provide a strong thesis statement that… continue…

CMU Sees Dramatic Rise in Women Computer Science Majors

Woman at Computer
Women comprise 40 percent of the incoming class at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science. That marks, in the school’s words, “a new benchmark.” It’s certainly a respectable number when compared to the proportion of women who earned bachelor’s degrees in computer science during the 2012-2013 school year: 14 percent, according to the Computer Research Association. It’s also nearly double the 22 percent that entered the school during that same period. Click here to search research jobs. The last… continue…

4 Basic Steps of Resume Writing

Posted In Looking in Tech
Foundation Blocks
  Tip of the Day For new graduates: Whatever job you’re looking for, you’ll construct your resume on a few simple foundation blocks. The first: resume samples—we’ve got free ones here. Select a simple design that lists your education and coursework before your experience, and includes a section for computer languages, operating systems and other technical expertise. It’s best to create a Microsoft Word document that converts easily to plain text. When you need a printed version, always use quality… continue…

Don’t Hide Behind the Team in Interviews

Posted In Looking in Tech
Teamwork
Tip of the Day Teamwork is important, and during interviews you always want to show that you’re a team player. But don’t go too far. When describing projects that you’ve worked on, talk about what you did. Don’t say “we took this approach…” or “we decided on this strategy.” To some managers, that can imply that “you” didn’t show much leadership and simply went along with the crowd. Hiring managers are trying to decide whether you can help them out… continue…