David Bolton

David Bolton was a game developer and a past game designer at MicroProse. He now works as an independent developer creating mobile and desktop applications and writes on programming for About.com and News.dice.com

Visual Studio 2013 Released – Worth Upgrading?

Posted In C++/C#, Working in Tech
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Visual Studio, Microsoft’s flagship development tool and considered the best IDE around, has had an overhaul, a new coat of polish and some new features added. But is it worth upgrading, when everyone upgraded to Visual Studio 2012 so recently? First appearing in 1997, Visual Studio has a long heritage. A year after its initial debut, Microsoft released version 6.0. After that, there wasn’t another upgrade for four years. In fact, I was still using Visual Studio 6.0 at work… continue…

Is TrueCrypt Truly Secure?

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Written in C++, with C and some assembler, TrueCrypt is an open source tool for creating encrypted disk volumes. The volumes it creates can be stored on an external disk, as a partition of a disk, or in a file on Windows, Linux or Mac. Developed in 2004, TrueCrypt is considered one of the best pro-privacy tools around. It’s so good, forensic examiners, in at least one case, couldn’t prove that a TrueCrypt encrypted hard disk contained incriminating evidence. The… continue…

Improve Your Job Search With a Personal Project

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More and more, hiring managers tell us that they want to hire candidates who work on personal projects outside of their jobs. Don’t believe me? Just check out a few of our recent Landing@ stories. They say the first place they look up a potential candidate is on Github. Personal projects and open source contributions are both great ways to demonstrate passion for the industry. They show initiative and can be a great way to sharpen your coding skills before… continue…

Creating a Multi-Player Game? Watch the Money

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Based in Auckland, New Zealand, indie developer David Colquohun started running his MMORTS game Ironfell in 2012. In August 2013, he had to close it down because it was losing too much money. The game had accumulated losses of $17,300, and that’s before calculating in payment for his time. Just one month later, in September 2013, Ironfell restarted. The new version had a number of changes to make it more active and reduce the number of empty realms. He’s also… continue…

Introduction to Rx – Reactive Extensions

Posted In C++/C#, Working in Tech
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Thirty years ago life was much simpler for desktop developers. Processors only had one core, GUIs, mice and event driven programming didn’t exist outside universities and UIs were simple affairs using cursor positioning on a text screen. Most software was developed procedurally at that time — object oriented programming hadn’t made the jump to mainstream. Now it’s all become much more complex. Windows, mice, text and graphics are all manipulated by event driven object oriented software. Technologies like LINQ help… continue…

Three Java IDEs Compared

Posted In Java, Working in Tech
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As a Java developer you are most likely to be familiar with Eclipse, but it’s not the only game in town. Other options to consider include NetBeans and Intellij IDEA. Which one’s the best? Here’s an overview of each to help you decide. Eclipse It started in 2001, when IBM released Eclipse into open source. Back then, It was a simple IDE to let programmers manage Java source code and edit it. It’s since become a major platform that’s used… continue…

XNA is Dead; Long Live MonoGame

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Back in January, Microsoft announced it was going to phase out XNA, the development framework that powered Xbox development. It also said it was no longer evolving the DirectX API, which has been the main technology for Windows games for the last 17 years. The announcement about DirectX was quickly retracted and a followup email indicated that DirectX development would continue and be better integrated into Visual Studio. But the way that communication was handled brought concern from developers about… continue…

A Free C++ Compiler for Android, But…

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Intel has just launched a C++ compiler for Android that compiles C++ source code and generates Android compatible bytecode. It isn’t the first C++ compiler to do it: The c4droid C++ compiler and IDE is available in Google Play for a few dollars, and the Android Developer Tools (ATD) plugin for the Eclipse IDE includes support for compiling code written in C or C++. It is, however, the only Intel C++ development tool that’s completely free for developers. Intel’s C++… continue…

Two Ways to Improve Online Privacy

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Following the continuing Snowden revelations, it’s fair to say that large swathes of online correspondences may be captured and processed by scanning software. If the communications that are captured are encrypted, then they’re stored and kept until they can be decrypted and read. To increase privacy, we want to make the decryption process as difficult as possible. Strengthening Encryption In theory, anything encrypted with a large number of bits (256, 512, etc.) should be impossible to decrypt without an immense… continue…

Run an Oil Field With This Documentary Game

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The oil industry has never been without its critics. Celebrities speaking out against it include the likes of Neil Young and Daryl Hannah, who have singled out Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada, because of the oil sands extraction going on there. The effort there has been described by Prime Minister Stephen Harper as the world’s largest energy project. Now there’s a Web documentary game coming in November: Fort McMoney by David Dufresne, is all about Fort McMurray. Dufresne is known… continue…