The 10 States With Fastest IT Job Growth

Five of the ten states with the fastest growing job growth in computer systems design and related services are on the East Coast, according to figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics cited in a Dice Report released Thursday.

Here’s a look at the Top 10 states, based on year-to-date figures:

Growth Drivers

In Maryland — the top-ranking state — biotech, healthcare services and local hospitals are driving the growth. And while the federal government also plays a role, concern is mounting among defense contractors that budget concerns may force a paring down of the federal workforce.

Massachusetts dropped to the second spot, but don’t feel too bad for tech professionals there. On any given day, there’s usually more than 3,500 IT job postings — a 12 percent increase over last year.

Texas, No. 3, not only posted decent job growth but ranks among the five states where more than 650,000 computer systems design and related services workers are located. New York, No. 4, is also among the five top states that are home to the most IT workers.

Other Players in the Mix

Some of the other states in the Top 10 bear noting. Says Alice Hill, Dice’s managing director:

  • Minnesota’s technology association (mhta) has the goal to make its state one of the country’s top-five technology states by 2020. But, IT hiring goes well beyond its technology companies to include retailers, healthcare companies, consulting firms, insurance companies and manufacturers.
  • Oregon holds the number six ranking, with nearly four percent growth in 2012. Its mobile software and open source communities are considered to be world class. But, there is a very compelling case to be made based on economics as to why tech talent is increasingly choosing Oregon. The average tech salary is greater than $80,000 in the state, and even higher in software and chip development – that’s a lot of purchasing power.
  • While the tech workforce isn’t huge in Utah, there are other factors boosting its growth rate. The state over-indexes in software at close to 1.5 times the national rate, according to Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development. The closer to the application – the faster the growth. Start-up to watch: Domo, a business intelligence company, based in American Fork.

Another thing to note: Technology powerhouses California and Washington State are nowhere to be seen among the fastest growing states for IT jobs.

You can get a PDF of the full Dice Report here.

Comments

  1. BY R. Emmett O'Ryan says:

    Frankly, with the automatic spending cuts of 10% scheduled to hit the Federal government on Jan. 02, 2013 (also known as “sequestration”), I am aware on many in the MD, VA, and DC area who looking to flee that area.

    Many colleagues in the DC area are looking to MA, TX, NY, and CA for opportunities in advance of this.

  2. BY adam says:

    One thing nice about IT is that you still have some job mobility. IT has diminished drastically over the years but it has not disappeared completely. Let me invite all the wacky people from DC, MD up to NY. Don’t worry you will fit right in with all the other freaks but be prepared to work your butts off. This is NY after all.

  3. BY Jacque says:

    I’m concerned for Arizona which in the past was ranked high for tech jobs. Currently, I see our jobs here in AZ going back east to Massachuettes and Pensylvania. AZ congress needs to get a grip and not only retain what business we have but husstle to get some more!

  4. BY Marsha says:

    I moved from Oregon about 1.5 ears ago. Um, where were all these jobs?

  5. BY JELaBarre says:

    I’m really surprised NY would be increasing. From what I’ve seen, every company that *can* leav alread has or is in the process of leaving. And every year the NY Govt makes taxes & such even worse than the year before, pushing yet more companies over the threshold to leave the state. About the only reason a company like IBM still has it’s headquarters in NY state is because they got a significant payoff (at the expense of NY taxpayers) to stay there.

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