Jobs Report Tells a Better Story for the Tech Sector

The tech unemployment rate told a better story than the trends in the overall U.S. labor market in July, hovering around half of the national level. And bringing in an added boost to tech’s strong performance was a turnaround in the telecom sector.

All told, 163,000 jobs were added last month to all industry sectors and although Reuters called it the most hiring in five months, the nation’s unemployment rate inched up to 8.3 percent, further raising worries of a slowing economy.

However, the sectors dominated by tech showed continuing trends in Friday’s Labor Department report, though for once telecom wasn’t on the skids. Hiring among makers of communications equipment rose 1.3 percent to 110,200 positions, and telecommunications grew 2.8 percent to 834,100 jobs.

Employment in other tech categories:

  • Computers and peripheral equipment, up 0.3 percent to 166,500 jobs.
  • Semiconductors and electronic components, down 1.7 percent to 385,700.
  • Data processing, hosting and related services, up 2.1 percent to 243,200.
  • Computer systems design and related services, up 7 percent  to 1,605,200.
  • Management and technical consulting services, up 6.3 percent to 1,142,700.

Though not limited to the tech market, temporary help services was among the healthiest sectors, up 14.1 percent to 2,539,600 positions, a growing trend as economic uncertainty makes employers wary of committing to full-time hires.

A separate report the Bureau of Labor Statistics, though not specific to tech, said the Silicon Valley area was the metropolitan market with the largest job increase by percentage year-over-year. It was followed by Houston and Austin, Texas. The New York area ranked tops in actual numbers (+116,000), followed by the Los Angeles area (+88,400) and Houston (+85,000).

Looking back at June, which the BLS report covered as well, a report from the California Employment Development Department found Cisco among the companies placing the most job ads (1,469) in June. In July, it announced plans to cut 1,300 jobs.

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Comments

  1. BY Computer Science Grad says:

    Although 163,000 jobs were added last month to all industry sectors, this does not distinctly define the percentage of jobs available by City, State, or experience level in the technical industry. I would like to know what continuing trends are being dominated by the technical industry. Is the Labor Department report focused on experience level, gender, and/or types (contract, permanent, temporary, full-time, part-time) of jobs available?

  2. BY twins.fan says:

    This is just more corporate propaganda, corporate America painting a bunch of blue sky designed to minimize the disaster being faced by the US worker.

    The story for disenfranchised US STEM workers is disaster. The story being spread by corporate America is blue sky. And leading the parade with corporate propaganda is Dice.com.

    The following story speaks of a world that Dice and the rest of corporate America choose to ignore. They choose to conceal the disaster facing disenfranchised US STEM workers.

    The title is: Tech firm says tech layoffs hit 3-year high during first half of 2012

    The url is: https://www.numbersusa.com/content/news/july-17-2012/tech-firm-says-tech-layoffs-hit-3-year-high-during-first-half-2012.html

    • BY James Green1 says:

      Do not criticize Dice and there articles, they will censor you and ban you from the site.

      • BY Mark Feffer says:

        For the record, criticize all you want — we just ask you to be courteous while you’re doing it.

        Best,

        Mark

      • BY twins.fan says:

        Being able to see yourself through other people’s eyes is a blessing.

        I own a business, and even though it may be counterintuitive, my best customers are the ones who chew my butt out when I make a bad mistake. If I don’t know about a problem, I cannot fix it.

        I am aware of Dice’s problem with censorship, and I don’t like it, but when I am a guest in someone’s house, I have to abide by their rules. If the rules are unacceptable to me, I need to leave that house.

  3. BY L Kline says:

    This is not “corporate America” trying to put lipstick on a pig, this is the present administration through the “main stream media” trying to gain another 4 years and relly change America. Corp[orate America wouold love for this to be true. So would the rest of us. So the newly filed unemployment number was 166,000 which was reported as “an improvement”. Really? But there are over 3.3 million people actively filing for unemployment benefits withis number changing because many ran out their 99 weeks. There are almost 20 million unemployed (the U6 number), Not good.

  4. BY Frank says:

    Looking for info on the following please: I currently work in the field performing voice and data communications installs that include cabling, telecom, and POS. How does the Chicago market look for PM hiring?

    • BY lizzie says:

      where do you live? I moved to Texas as the IT departments are still run by a few ol’military men who are for keeping America employed. The southern states *I am from Boston* tend to have better jobs. Try the beauty industry, they are recession proof! I left a financial firm for a recession proof company.

      If you are inexperienced you should go out and consult. It gives you the opportunity to ‘proof’ yourself and learn new skills. trust me.. i have been employed long enought to be the so-called SME – subject matter expert and guess what?! I can’t get in on the new training and technology, the consultants get it as my resource capacity is well over 120% and I have no time!

      good luck! I am so hoping you youngins get a break soon!

  5. BY Another IT Grad says:

    As the other guy pointed out, it matters where you live. I’m giving up on the tech industry. I don’t have time to wait around begging to get a job, and I cannot be some consultant being contracted out to who knows where. Getting a degree in this industry was a big mistake because there is so much competition and everyone wants years of experience on top of the degree even for entry level jobs. Some of us cannot uproot and move to one of those major cities either.

    Also, am I the only one noticing all these consulting firms where the owners and most of the employees are from India here in the states? No offense to them, but outsourcing IT jobs to India wasn’t enough so now they are opening companies all over the states? What’s up with that?

  6. BY lizzie says:

    even the Recruitment companies outsourced their recruiters!

    Wake up corporate CEOS you outsource your work you expose us, your consumers, our personal and confidential information that can easily be sold on the black market and you will have nothing to do.

    You would pass this on to your consumers to handle. What the hell do you care you CEOs are so removed from the real world. These CSR and IT jobs that go overseas?! Well they are not trained in industry standards and can not communicate nor care about what you asked them to do. They will do it their way , not test it to ensure quality controls are in place and throw back at ya CEOS. then you wonder why your systems are not performing as they were suppose to or your customers leave and you have no more loyal customers.

    because you outsourced it to countries that have not a clue nor properly trained or educated. that is why they came in droves with the h1 visas to learn our culture.

    long story short… costs you more than twice to have your systems fixed right and usually by a local contractor on a short 3-6 months contract. You expose us to identity fraud, by allowing overseas IT folks access to your corporate databases.

    Hell, no worries CEO of corporate America. We don’;t have jobs, our credit cards are maxed out to pay for grocery and gas, our credit scores are shot as we had to declare bankruptcy and foreclose on our homes!

    you go ahead and enjoy your profits while we unemploy tap into your tax dollars for welfare that we will be collecting for the next 20 years. There will not be any middle class to tax!

  7. BY Hal - lead developer - Charlotte NC says:

    To all the entry level IT folks who are still looking, please be patient and don’t lose heart while we transition through the deepest recession since WWII. Better times are on the horizon and even the outsourcing trend has started to shift work back to the US. Just hang in there and be willing to locate where the jobs are. Go to Houston, Austin, Raleigh-Durham, DC, NY or wherever you see a cluster of your skill set you want to work in. Consulting is great for all levels and keeps you working in the trade and the paycheck coming. The market is improving and future growth will bring back the entry level openings that have been in such short supply these past four or five years.

    • BY Another IT Grad says:

      And how exactly does one do this when they are a single parent? I can’t just uproot and move to a different state or be contracted out to wherever they feel like sending me. I also can’t wait around and be “patient” when I have bills to pay. Forget this field.

      • BY trothaar says:

        I was just about to say the same thing, although in my case it’s a husband and four pets who I cannot simply uproot (plus, I don’t have the money to move hundreds or thousands of miles away).

        I don’t think the economy is getting any better. In fact, it’s getting worse, and will continue to worsen until the entire country collapses. But even if I am wrong and “Hal” is right, my bills need to be paid now, not months or years from now. So I gave up on IT and opened a pet-sitting business.

        My advice to all recent IT grads who have discovered that the degrees they spent years working on are worthless is this: take whatever kind of temp/contract work/gigs you can get to keep money coming in while you figure out your next move. It took me about a year to stumble into pet sitting.

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