How to Use BYOD to Your Advantage

Laptop KeyboardSome employees love the idea of bringing their own devices to work, and their bosses are seeing dollar signs in the trend’s potential for cutting costs. But Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols’s recent piece in Computerworld raises questions about BYOD’s unintended consequences. He points out that in their rush to save money, employers might be tempted to make self-supported equipment and software a requirement for getting a job — or keeping the job. I think the odds are on this happening.

Considering the pressure both large and small companies are under to make a profit — not to mention stay in business — BYOD is a viable cost-saver. And as the federal government continues to monkey around with taxes and regulations, companies want to minimize spending. After the recent Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act, frustration in many businesses is undoubtedly on the rise. Nobody knows just how the new costs and regulations will affect operations, but they know it will cost money and time, maybe even jeopardize their futures.

After spending my whole life in tech, I’m a strong proponent of using the latest and greatest equipment, whenever possible. The best way to do have employees do that is by having them bring their own devices. Who has time to wait around for some low-budget notebook or slow cell phone network when income-producing work needs to be done?

The Independent Route

As an independent consultant and writer, I’ve supplied my own infrastructure for the last decade. Clients don’t care what I use or how I do what I do, as long as I get the job done on time and without surprises.

I’ve always done my homework and made equipment purchases based on performance and features, with price being a close but not deal-breaking consideration. I buy the fastest, most capable and reliable hardware I can afford and then take care of it so it lasts.

Most people aren’t prepared for the change. If you’re one of them, you need to think fast. If you’re not ready, BYOD could hinder your ability to get and/or hold down a job. I’m afraid that workers who aren’t ready to show up with their own bag of tricks will be face a real challenge.

The good thing is that IT specialists, programmers and mobile developers are the most capable of turning BYOD into a profitable opportunity and a competitive advantage.

If you’re independent — or want to be — here are few ideas that may help you get ready:

  • Start your own consulting firm specializing in “employee hardware and software” support.
  • Start selling package deals of equipment that cater to a specialized clientele.
  • Consider opening a “workspace cafe” where people can go to get things done. For a small fee, you could supply the computers, network and support.
  • Create and present seminars for both businesses and job seekers on how to meet the new challenge of self-owned infrastructure.

Related links

Comments

  1. BY Jimmy Lozano says:

    Another “Classic” article from DICE, who trying to convince people to follow these “Classic” 4 steps (final of this article), and you will get a JOB…

    C’mon DICE, try to help at Unemployment person, writing BETTER articles, to find a REAL JOBS.

  2. BY David Strom says:

    I disagree. If you want to make the break and go out on your own, I think Rob has some good ideas here. I did it 20 years ago and I have (almost) never looked back.

    • BY Jimmy Lozano says:

      —-”” I did it 20 years ago and I have (almost) never looked back. “”—-

      I wonder if you’re still working on the same place 20 years ago, but even if you’re still using the same “own devices” that YOU did you use 20 years ago.

      C’mon… be realistic…

      and make a good comments (If you want REALLY help this article)

      • BY Mark Feffer says:

        I think David made a good comment, and good point, and you shouldn’t imply that he’s using old devices. What he’s saying is he’s gone out on his own, and is glad he did it.

  3. BY Jimmy Lozano says:

    Mr. Feffer:

    Be careful with this “kind of answer” in the comments from other persons, because seems like: you are trying to answer for HIM instead to read the REAL THOUGHT of this guy.
    but, If you are FRIEND of David Strom… then EVERYTHING CHANGE, because the comments from him HAVE NOT credibility and validity to be correct as well as YOUR article (particularly this one).

    • BY Mark Feffer says:

      David’s reply is perfectly valid, even if you disagree with it, and you shouldn’t question anyone’s credibility here. We’re all professionals, after all.

  4. BY Rob Reilly says:

    Jimmy,

    I’m afraid this thread is getting off the track.

    The point of the story was to try to encourage and prepare people for what I think is coming in the future. Namely, that bring-your-own-devices (BYOD), in my mind, will be the norm soon.

    Certainly, in an era of extremely tight budgets, high unemployment, and distress in the job market realizing that you’ll probably have to buy and support your own IT needs is unsettling. That is particularly acute for people currently looking for work.

    I should point out that there are plenty of highly capable notebooks, tablets, routers, smartphones, etc. available at reasonable prices. Personally, I always purchase the most powerful and robust equipment I can afford. And I make careful, deliberate choices to avoid problems. It takes research, tech knowledge, experience, and time to pick the right stuff. Sadly, there are no shortcuts.

    My personal choices are HP for printers. Asus for my notebook, netbook, and tablets. Samsung for my smartphones. Trendnet for my routers. Reasonable prices and tough equipment.

    Also, as the Mobile Development Community Guide my job is to try to help readers succeed in their career and job search efforts. I’m on the editorial side and don’t provide jobs to people. The job search side of Dice has thousands and thousands of job leads. Thousands of companies use the Dice service to try to find candidates who can help them succeed, in their businesses. It’s the reader’s responsibility to find and make the connections, that will be mutually beneficial to themselves and the company.

    Service is the name of the game in my own consulting practice. I do my best to help my clients succeed in their business and receive a fee for my services and expertise.

    BYOD, for me is nothing new. It’s kind of like knowing how to use MS Word or read email. It’s just not that big of a deal for readers, in my opinion.

    Embrace the new and figure out how to leverage it, to YOUR advantage.

    That’s the whole story in a nutshell.

    • BY Jimmy Lozano says:

      Mr. Rob Reilly
      Everything you said in this comments is OK because is based from your own thoughts and (supposedly) your own experience.
      But my point is:
      —-”” Another “Classic” article from DICE, who trying to convince people to follow these “Classic” 4 steps (final of this article), and you will get a JOB… “”—-
      Can You please be more specific or give us an example how those 4 steps you wrote in your article will help us to get a job or get ready to work?

      • BY Rob Reilly says:

        Jimmy,

        Actually, the 4 steps in the article aren’t “classic”. They are suggestions or ideas that a person could develop through their effort and hard work, particularly oriented to the BYOD craze. You certainly would agree that BYOD can hardly be considered a classic part of IT. I make no claim that they are a formula or a classic set of steps. As a matter of fact, the previous sentence specifies that they are in fact “ideas”.

        Again, my job is to try to motivate readers to find their niche. Encourage them to reach inside themselves and discover their strengths and the unique qualities that will bring them a good income and happiness in their work.

        Also, I don’t purposely post stories to waste Dice reader’s valuable time. My suggestions are honest and sincere.

        Asking for a step-by-step formula for employment success, is simply not possible. I can’t predict every challenge, success, situation, or outcome that readers will encounter any more than anyone else.

        The point is to take a look at what Dice has to offer, think about how you can use it to your advantage, then go take positive action to make your dream come true. Readers have to do that. I have to do it in my consultancy. Workers have to do it in their companies.

        The BYOD wave is here. If you choose to…embrace it. Think about it deeply. Learn how to use it. Be the expert. Speak about it. Write about it. Be the best. Then, take my valuable suggestions and run with them.

        If you don’t choose to pursue BYOD, then find another niche and run with that.

        In the end your success ultimately depends on you.

  5. BY Jimmy Lozano says:

    —”” Actually, the 4 steps in the article aren’t “classic”. They are suggestions or ideas that a person could develop through their effort and hard work, “”—
    —”” Again, my job is to try to motivate readers to find their niche. “”—
    —””Asking for a step-by-step formula for employment success, is simply not possible. I can’t predict every challenge, success, situation, or outcome that readers will encounter any more than anyone else. “”—

    Well… Now I have clear idea about your article with this comment, sorry about MY MISTAKE to believe that this article would help me find a job, but as you well say it:
    —-”” Workers have to do it in their companies. “”—-

    Once again, sorry for my mistake to believe this article will help me to find a Job, because right now like unemployment I’m desperately try to find a job in USA this days. Thank you for this advice:
    —-”” Asking for a step-by-step formula for employment success, is simply not possible “”—-

    Now I Know that I’m searching in the WRONG PLACE.

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