Enterprise Technology is Pushing IT Aside

IT as we know it is over, but the next wave of enterprise technology will be bigger, more compelling, and more rewarding, says Johna Till Johnson, co-founder of Nemertes Research.

How dramatic are the changes in your IT department? Tell us by posting a comment below.

Writing in Network World, Johnson notes that more than 90 percent of IT organizations use some form of managed, hosted or cloud services.

Yes, IT — at least as we’ve known it for approximately 25 years — is indeed transforming. But far from becoming a commodity, technology is more important than ever. Businesses, schools, and governments desperately need tech-savvy managers who can innovate quickly, operationalize effectively, and keep their organizations competitive. In other words, IT is being replaced by “enterprise technology” (ET): technology that’s no longer confined to offices and office workers, but is embedded throughout the enterprise.

ET is the combination of technologies that enables embedded and networked intelligence, which includes everything from smartphones and wireless sensor networks to organic LEDs, enhanced battery technologies, quantum computing and Big Data.

In the past, MIS was about optimizing back-office functions. Eventually it lost out to IT, which empowered knowledge workers. ET is about the constant flow of information that can be used to make every slice of an organization perform more effectively and efficiently. As ET brings in technologies that are outside the purview of traditional IT departments, it’s on the verge of conquering IT.

That means that if you’re in IT, you have to become a master of the technologies that deliver an unprecedented ability for enterprises to optimize, accelerate and control core business functions. You must transparently integrate and support the standalone technologies that together comprise the ET ecosystem. You don’t want to be like that old-time MIS director who failed to adapt.

Comments

  1. BY tloftus2009 says:

    Your assesment may be a bit premature. I cannot believe that IT will be eliminated. MIS was never really eliminated. IT still has application programmers to customize apps and make them more powerful tools for the business. In a similar way, businesses will still need networks, desktops and other devices (e.g.; iPhone, Android) that will require security, operation and maintenance.

    A possible future I can see is that of asmaller IT team managing a collection of contracted companies that deliver computing services to the business.

    These folks are still IT and these contracted companies are IT – engineers, technicians, programmers, project managers, etc. They will still be technical people that require management, errr IT Managers.

    Wait a minute…. This is sounding like the outsource scenario that folks predicted in the 80s, and hosting in the 90s. Now it’s called “the cloud”. Maybe over-simplified, but I feel always challenged to dumb things down a bit to allow them to be more clearly understood.

    That changed IT as people knew it, but still, 30 years later, the changes haven’t eliminated IT.
    Therefore, I take the newly predicted paradigm with a grain of salt. Time has shown me that each wave of IT restructuring/redefining is just that and not elimination.

    The future is coming. IT will still be here, be it another name and responsibilities.

  2. BY tloftus2009 says:

    This thinking may be a bit premature. I cannot believe that IT will be eliminated. MIS was never really eliminated. There are still application programmers to customize apps and make them more powerful tools for the business. In a similar way, businesses will still need networks, desktops and other devices that will require operation and maintenance.

    A possible future I can see is that of a small IT team managing a collection of contracted companies that deliver computing services to the business. These folks are still IT and these contracted companies are IT – engineers, technicians, programmers, project managers, etc. – Technical folks that still require management – IT Managers.

    Wait a minute…. This is sounding like the outsource scenario that folks predicted in the 80s, and hosting in the 90s. Now it’s called “the cloud”. I may be over-simplifying this, but I always feel challenged to dumb things down a bit to allow them to be more clearly understood.

    IT has continually changed and adapted, but still, 30 years later, the changes haven’t eliminated IT.

    Therefore, I take this newly predicted paradigm with a grain of salt. Time has shown me that each wave of IT restructuring/redefining is just that…. and not elimination.

    The future is coming. IT will still be here, be it another name and responsibilities.

    Timothy R. Loftus

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