Cincinnati Needs Tech Pros… Badly

Cincinnati suffers from chronically high unemployment, yet hundreds of open tech jobs go unfilled for months, or longer, according to Cincinnati.com. This reflects an ongoing national trend as the U.S. labor pool shifts to address the increasing demand for tech professionals in business.

Tech jobs in Ohio pay well. Last January, nearly 2,100 tech jobs were advertised in online and help wanted ads, according to data compiled by Cincinnati.com from the 2018 Ohio Job Outlook Employment Projections report. The department says that overall, Computer and Information System Managers are the second most in demand. It expects to see more than 10,000 of those positions by 2018, up from about 9,800 in 2008.

“The burden of educating young people about tech careers is really falling on business,” Jim Scott, Kroger’s former chief technology officer turned chief information officer at KnowledgeWorks Foundation, told Cincinnati.com. “If we weren’t Cincinnati and a natural philanthropic community, I think we’d really be suffering right now.”

Area leaders are currently considering a six-month boot camp for unemployed or underemployed workers to learn tech skills such as programming, help desk or systems analysis. Partners for a Competitive Workforce, a partnership in the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana region focused on meeting demand for skilled workers, is also collaborating with CompTIA to conduct one of two pilots of a six-month apprenticeship program. The program allows participants to earn certifications and take on entry level helpdesk and call center jobs. Its goal is to introduce people to the field, expecting they’ll either pursue a technical degree or learn other sought-after skills.

Comments

  1. BY Julius Rainey says:

    Where can I find these jobs?

  2. BY Fred Bosick says:

    “The program allows participants to earn certifications and take on entry level helpdesk and call center jobs. Its goal is to introduce people to the field, expecting they’ll either pursue a technical degree or learn other sought-after skills.”

    This is all fine and well, but what happens if/when those jobs go overseas?

    The fundamental problem here is *not* that there is a shortage of people to take these jobs. It’s that business expects jobseekers to take *all* the risk of acquiring skills in the language/technology of the month and then cherry picks the hapless applicant to train the offshore resource and then get laid off.

    If business wants skilled IT people, *business* must pay for training and guarantee lengthy employment and opportunity to advance! Business people aren’t the only ones who consider ROI.

  3. BY Sam S says:

    There is no IT shortage. If you pay well, they will come. It is as simple as that. But if want people to spend 5+ years learning very specialized skills and don’t pay well, don’t expect people to go into that field.

    Smart people think very carefully about these things and if you pay your salespeople or lawyers who work for the company more than the people who build the products, the smart people will go into sales or law.

    • BY Proud Paulbot says:

      That is exactly why I decided to forget about tech and go into marketing. There’s simply more money to be made in marketing — and the learning curve isn’t anywhere near as steep.

      I like what another poster below said:

      ——-business expects jobseekers to take *all* the risk of acquiring skills in the language/technology of the month and then cherry picks the hapless applicant to train the offshore resource and then get laid off.——-

      That’s what I saw myself doing: spending months on end struggling to go through tutorials and learning various technologies–all the while not being able to pay my bills–and still not being able to get a job.

      There are several problems with this:

      1) It’s not possible to become fluent in all of these languages simply by going through online tutorials. Total fluency comes from using them every day in a work situation. This is the way it is in ALL fields, not just tech; there are many things one simply cannot learn in a classroom situation alone.

      2) How am I supposed to pay my bills while I’m spending my days going through tutorials? I can say from experience that when you’re worried about whether you’re going to have a place to live in a few months–actually, whether you are going to become homeless and die–it’s impossible to concentrate on anything else but primal survival.

      3) Even if, by some stroke of luck or genius, I did manage to achieve fluency in 12 languages, by the time I achieved it, they’d be obsolete.

      I’m doing what these unemployed JD’s have been advised to do: forget about what you went to school for, and find a way to make money outside of the field you studied:

      http://www.forbes.com/sites/shenegotiates/2012/03/13/no-job-student-loans-due-consider-the-alternative/

      I wish I had taken this path earlier. Perhaps my credit wouldn’t have been ruined if I’d stopped chasing rainbows a year ago.

  4. BY Ken says:

    I am a IT hiring manager in Cincinnati and received over 200 qualified candidates for each opening I had. Sounds like these business leaders are shilling for more outsourcing visas.

  5. BY matt says:

    Its called telecommuting, obv Cincinnati is not clever enough to get the job done!

  6. BY Carol McCullough says:

    There is a very simpe solution to local shortages. Allow people to telecomute from other areas in the US. The technology is there and it is available.

  7. BY Proud Paulbot says:

    ——If we weren’t Cincinnati and a natural philanthropic community——

    Philanthropic? Taxes are hardly philanthropic. If you don’t pay them, gov’t thugs storm into your home and take you to prison.

    I invite anyone to point me to the section of the Constitution that states the GOV’T has the responsibility to pay for training workers for private enterprises, and that private enterprises have the right to demand such.

    If these businesses see a need for training THEIR employees, then it is THEIR responsibility to pay for it…NOT THE TAXPAYERS’. Why in the world should training your employees be my problem?

    ———The burden of educating young people about tech careers is really falling on business——

    And they think this “burden” should fall on…..WHO? Oh, let me guess: the government, meaning the taxpayers, who should pay to “educate” the populace about these jobs.

    Sorry, but the “burden” of “educating” the populace–and retaining and training employees–is the problem of individual businesses, NOT THE GOV’T. This is simply the way business works. This is the way it has ALWAYS worked…in EVERY FIELD, not just tech.

    • BY delta says:

      Paulbot,

      I’ve been thinking some time now of taking the same path you have – tech to marketing. Would you be able to provide any advice on how you made the transition?

      Thanks!

      -Delta

      • BY Proud Paulbot says:

        Well, for me, it’s really a transition BACK to marketing. I was a marketing copywriter for years before attending college…where I decided to get a STEM degree because I was told, “That’s where the jobs are.”

        Yep.

        Unfortunately, most tech people cannot replicate what I did, because they have no work background other than in tech. Conversely, I have no work background in tech, only in marketing.

        Right now, I’ve leveraged that experience into contract work for an online PR firm. It pays well–up to $18.00/hour, as opposed to the unpaid “internships” I was told I’d need to work (for YEARS) to qualify for a $10.00/hour tech job–but it is contract work. I need to build my own business for the long-term.

        I sorely wish I’d switched gears and poured all of my effort into getting marketing-related work last year, instead of spending months banging my head into a wall. My credit is ruined, and I nearly ended up destroying my life and that of my family.

        My advice for people with a tech background but no marketing or sales background would be to look at Sales Engineer opportunities. It’s really difficult to find a good Sales Engineer. I cannot do that job because I don’t have enough tech knowledge, plus I’m more of a marketing person, not a salesperson. A company *might* be willing to take on a promising candidate who has no sales experience, but is a walking encyclopedia of tech and has good people skills.

  8. BY David says:

    I strongly agree with Carol’s and Matt’s comments. Besides, having job openings is garbage if you’re not filling them. The federal government is doing the same thing. They also need more tech people, but they’re not “back-filling” positions when military or civilian personnel leave. IMO, businesses and the government are shooting themselves in the foot.

    Personally, I’d love to telecommute. It’d be a lot better than my current 3 hour roundtrip commute to my current job.

  9. BY David says:

    Ken – As I previously indicated, having over 200 qualified candidates per position means nothing if your company is not filling the positions.

    • BY Mark Feffer says:

      Actually, this is a good point. Ken, can you shed some light on why the jobs aren’t getting filled?

      • BY Ken says:

        I filled our open positions immediately. So no problems here.

      • BY James Green says:

        You know the answer to this one Mark, companies want to hire inexpensive h1b workers in stead of more expensive highly compitent american workers. Companies want to complain to increase h1b head count by claiming there are not enough American workers to fill those jobs. And dice continues to spread this propaganda message.

  10. BY Julius Rainey says:

    I look at Dice.com and I found this site too, https://ohiomeansjobs.com/omj/..

  11. BY Glen Sorensen says:

    I liked Cincinnati. But I needed a job. And I like high tech jobs. So I had to leave. Last person out, please shut off the lights. :))

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