CRM Developers Face a Bright Future

CRM is relatively new, so there’s a shortage of tech professionals who know how to work with it. Experienced, creative developers take note: You are needed and wanted. If you can specialize, a line of anxious employers may already be forming to your left.

Vimal Shyamji, partner and general manager of technology contracting at Winter, Wyman is seeing a trend in companies that are buying CRM software. “They’re bringing in developers to modify and enhance the software for their specific company and industry,” he said, and as a result, “JAVA developers with CRM experience are in high demand.”

Shyamji works with developers with expertise in SalesForce, one of the newest in the flock of CRM programs. Since it is cloud-based, it has an immediate quality due to its extensive social networking components. “It’s all about customizing systems, the integration work,” he said. “I’ve seen qualified CRM candidates get a job offer and hired in one day and some have received as many as three competitive offers in a day.” That being said, there’s love to be felt for Siebel and those of you who’ve tampered with Microsoft Dynamics, Oracle On Demand and more. Winter, Wyman’s numbers reveal their placements have tripled between 2010 and 2011.

If you want to break into the field it may be a tough. CRM experts are Java developers, who usually gain experience on some type of CRM software within their company. Then they become specialists and jump to the next job. If this is an area that sparks your interest, you may want to start networking your way into your company’s CRM crew.

Shyamji said SalesForce is aggressively hiring as well. He says they’re “tight knit, team oriented and progressive” and “they hire best and brightest.” If you’re ready for an elevated level of challenge, you may want to investigate this company’s employment opportunities.

As a whole, there are blue skies ahead for CRM and its allied industries. Innovation and market competition are driving the growth. The expansion means that more Java developers may try to transition to CRM development, and more enterprise software companies may invest in and try to build out their CRM offerings.

Comments

  1. BY James Green says:

    Another useless article from Dice…But at least the article said you need to have a job before you can get into this type of work. All of the so called career advise Dice shares, you already have a job. And people who already work in this field don’t need the advise, they already know they are a hot commodity. The type agonize we need is how do we obtain the experience that companies want without working for a company. What companies are will to train, like they use too, in what they need.

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