How to Overcome the Biases of a Hiring Manager

DICETV: It’s human nature to make assumptions about someone before you actually meet them. But failing to challenge a hiring manager’s biases can keep you from landing an interview or a job. So how do you anticipate their concerns and overcome them? Like this.

Comments

  1. BY Mike says:

    Valualize? Is that an actual word?

  2. BY Mike says:

    My mistake. The word used was “Valueize”. Regardless, it does not exist. Cripes.

  3. BY R. Emmett O'Ryan says:

    All good advice although I’m not sure if I would offer up a performance review document. I think that goes a bit far in trying to overcome a hiring manager’s bias.

    As a hiring manager, I prefer good solid references. If a candidate were to offer up a previous performance review I would find this not only a little odd but suspicious and desperate.

    • BY trothaar says:

      As a hiring manager, are you not aware that most companies FORBID supervisors from giving “good solid references”? Are you not aware that most companies will ONLY verify dates, title and salary…period?

      Companies do not even want their supervisors to say positive things about employees, because there have been lawsuits filed where Company A gave a glowing reference regarding their former employee, John Doe, to Company B…and then Doe went on to embezzle or even commit workplace violence. Don’t believe me? Look it up, or better yet, ask your Legal Department.

      It astounds me how many people are oblivious to the legal liability they are exposing their company to if they do anything but verify name, rank and serial number. The world is not full of puppies, rainbows and smiles. It’s full of litigious people who sue anyone they can whenever something bad happens, because “someone must be held responsible.”

      • BY R. Emmett O'Ryan says:

        Are you aware of a system on the internet called LinkedIn?

        While many companies (especially those run by the Cost Accountants and HR) have such practices, it does not prevent an individual from providing a personal reference to a former co-worker – at least not in the US – perhaps in North Korea.

        As for legal liability, etc., when has it been there any issue with saying something positive about someone based on your knowledge? And if a reference has nothing positive to say he can gracefully decline giving any reference.

        Yes, as a manager, I am aware of such ridiculously silly practices put out by HR to supervisors. And I promptly ignore them because I know that HR is there NOT as a benefit to the company, or to me as a manager…

        Have I ever given references on previous employees? As an individual (not representing my company), yes I have and I expect I will continue to do so. Have I ever declined a reference? Yes I have… my personal policy is if you have nothing good to say about some one, say nothing.

        As you want to bring the issue of legal liability into this, as far as I know, most performance review documents are considered company proprietary. If a employment candidate were to offer up such a document – whether solicited or not – do you seriously think I would even consider someone like this.

    • BY trothaar says:

      ——As for legal liability, etc., when has it been there any issue with saying something positive about someone based on your knowledge?——-

      “In Randi W. v. Muroc Joint Unified School District, a former school employer gave unqualified positive letters of recommendation about a former school administrator employee. None of these letters disclosed that the employee had been accused of sexual abuse and molestation of students, and that the employee had resigned after being confronted with the accusations. After being hired by another school, based in part upon the positive recommendation, the employee molested another child. Establishing new legal precedent, the Court held, in cases where there is a “substantial foreseeable risk of physical injury to third persons” arising from an incomplete or misleading positive job recommendation, the former employer will be liable to third persons physically injured by the former employee’s actions.”

      http://www.reish.com/publications/article_detail.cfm?ARTICLEID=128

      ——Are you aware of a system on the internet called LinkedIn?…While many companies (especially those run by the Cost Accountants and HR) have such practices, it does not prevent an individual from providing a personal reference to a former co-worker – at least not in the US – perhaps in North Korea.——

      You actually trust those things? They’re traded by former co-workers (and even strangers–see below) like candy being traded by children. They remind me of the “if you like my Facebook biz page, I’ll like yours” threads that are standard in LI groups.

      I’ve personally witnessed people LYING for each other on LI, claiming to have worked together when they NEVER DID and trading “references.” One of my “contacts”–a complete stranger whom I’ve never even met, let alone worked with–has asked me to do this for them on multiple occasions. I didn’t bite, but others did. I’ve had other “contacts” approach me about this as well.

      ——As you want to bring the issue of legal liability into this, as far as I know, most performance review documents are considered company proprietary. If a employment candidate were to offer up such a document – whether solicited or not – do you seriously think I would even consider someone like this.———-

      Since that individual wouldn’t fit into your “puppies & rainbows” view of the world, I’m guessing not.

      • BY R. Emmett O'Ryan says:

        Oh well, I guess I’ve been successful at finding the right “puppies & rainbows.” I don’t think I am going to change because I’ve have a lot of success and so have many others.

        I’ve also been successful at helping many others be the right “puppies & rainbows” because I look for people who believe in themselves and their abilities.

        Good luck in your endeavors.

  4. BY Eugene says:

    unfortunately it has become a trend with many larger companies that they will not provide references, but only verify employment due to potential liability. I have had two employers in a row with this policy, both major firms, and it made it challenging to find another job since all I have to show for years of fine service are written performance reviews.

    • BY R. Emmett O'Ryan says:

      If you have colleagues who you worked with at your previous companies, quite often hiring managers would be pleased to speak with them.

      As for providing written performance reviews, please be careful as many companies either state implicitly or explicitly that such documents are considered company proprietary or confidential. Providing company proprietary documents to a prospective employer is not well looked upon.

      • BY Mike says:

        You want to also make certain that all of your “evaluations” are written and placed in a permanent file. I had the very pleasant experience of receiving glowing verbal evaluations from a boss; sadly nothing ever in writing. Then my boss was moved to a different position. The new boss made certain my permanent file contained written evals, and every one of them was a negative.

  5. BY Joseph says:

    Why doesn’t the IT recruiter world have a certification to alleviate the bias that is almost pre-existing in nearly every interview among recruiters ? They should know the rules and apply them evenly across the playing field !

  6. BY Dellrugby says:

    I like CAT in the Run DMC shirt. Very nice.

  7. BY Sally Jane says:

    Reviews are done on a yearly basis by managers. You are given a copy of that review to an employee and that copy belongs to that employee. What is wrong with you showing your last review with a new employer when there was a layoff. Some employer’s might ask for a company review and if is a glowing review what is the problem.

    • BY R. Emmett O'Ryan says:

      Many performance reviews I have seen, from my own Company and others, have a marking on them like “Company Confidential” or “Company Proprietary”. As a hiring manager, I have a problem even seeing such documents (that are from another company).

      To date, in 20 years of hiring techs, no one has ever presented one of these to me. I have seen many, many reference letters and I do use LinkedIn and the Internet to check on a candidate.

      Now if someone presented me with a performance review, would I use it? Only if it wasn’t marked “Company Confidential” or “Company Proprietary” would I accept it. Then I would promptly contact the reviewer (former supervisor/manager) to verify that the document was accurate and authentic.

      Now whether the previous manager/supervisor would officially acknowledge the contents of an employee’s Performance Review to a complete stranger… that would certainly be an interesting exercise.

  8. BY Bill Golasinski says:

    If the “Hiring Manager” doesn’t like you, for whatever reason,
    MOVE ON because you are SCREWED.

    • BY Mike says:

      and if you end up with a manager who does not like you, move on because you will be screwed.

  9. BY MAS says:

    I am valueizing that the 2:09 minutes I just spent on this video was valueless.

  10. BY Cori says:

    I find it interesting that the little clip says people might find you “restless” if you job from contract to contract. Fact is that many people that don’t have multiple years of experience can only find contract jobs. Also many places right now are hiring contractors simply to cut down on their expenses. If you look at my resume since graduating with an IT degree it looks horrible. Less than one year with my first company as the position was cut (which then leads to a few months gap in employment). Very short term seasonal job (less than 3 months which then leads to another gap in employment). Contract job that the company put a policy in place that after 2 years of service as a contractor you are required a 90 day break in service, with no guarentee of rehire…guess what gap in employment!

  11. BY linda says:

    I think she is correct in that if you think there is a week spot in your credentials—–so will the recruiter. So anticipate how you would answer a question. I think it is good to write these answers down and see if they make sense to you and address the questions at hand. Just for your own edification.

    I’d never give anyone my performance appraisal.

    How do you overcome an age bias??? Too old???

  12. BY Josh says:

    While this is more or less common sense (which we all know isn’t too common), it’s nice to see that it’s still regarded as sound advice.

    However, does anyone else think the volume is low on these videos? Maybe it’s just me and my setup, but my speakers are fine for everything else…..Weird.

  13. BY Karen says:

    Background sound/music makes it diffifult to hear the presentation

  14. BY Fred says:

    So let’s see: Companies want me to accumulate skills. If I gather these skills through the only available jobs, which are contract, I have a fear of commitment? Sounds like the last relationship I was in. If the company wants me to have a diverse skill set that I have accumulated over time, I’m too old? If I worked before there was a LinkedIn or other social sites, my references are gone with the connection to the people I worked with. I should personalize my resume for recruiters that have a job description that sounds like a lot of the job descriptions that come from other companies. I should submit my resumes for job descriptions from hiring managers who realize that the resumes they are receiving don’t fit the job description they had in their head and the job is put on hold?

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