DiceTV: Check Out New Cities BEFORE You Take a Job There

The Script

Is your city in a funk? Has your career stalled? Perhaps you’ve considered relocating to a tech hot spot like Austin or the Silicon Valley. Canta and I are thinking about it. Well,  before you pull up stakes and head for greener pastures there’s a few things you should consider.

I’m Cat Miller, here with my best friend Canta,  and this is DiceTV.

Cities like Boston or New York can be tempting when you look at the salaries, but the cost of living is higher too. You may end up in a small apartment with less discretionary income despite earning a higher salary. Take advantage of websites and online tools that compare the cost of living and relocation expenses before you commit.

If urban living doesn’t pencil-out, consider second-tier cities that feature vibrant tech communities. You might be able to live well on a mid-range salary in Austin, Pittsburgh or Raleigh. Even the Washington D.C./Baltimore area offers a robust tech market and you’ll enjoy great job security because the region is supported by a steady flow of federal funds.

If you’ve been dreaming about a new career in sunny California, don’t be dissuaded by reports of high unemployment. The golden state currently has more than 13,000 job listings on Dice and experts say California will create 46,000 new and replacement IT and communications jobs in the next two years. In fact, California tech jobs are expected to grow by 7 percent which is nearly double the estimates for the region’s overall job growth.

But California is so large, you need to do your homework before you pack your bags. The state has seven cities with populations greater than 500,000 and each area caters to different industries and careers. Tech firms in the Silicon Valley are actively recruiting Web developers, software developers and engineers, while San Diego is home to a number of telecom and defense firms.

Review job postings, press releases, census data and information from the local chamber of commerce to get a feel for the business climate and to select a city where your career can flourish.

You’ll – we’ll know we’ve found greener pastures when we find the right position, the right salary and the perfect place to live, with a handsome Schnauser next door.

I’m Cat Miller – this is Canta – and this has been Dice TV. We now return you to your regular desktop.

Comments

  1. BY MoChaMan says:

    One big issue with relocating and finding a job in a different city is that employers will immediately throw your resume in the trash if your city is not the same as their city . In order to get a job in another city you need to have a friend there that will let you borrow his/her address for yourself so you can pretend to live in that city and make yourself a viable candidate.

    You also need to figure out how you’re going to get there for interviews . One strategy is to schedule all your interviews for one day , then take that one day off and drive or fly out for all the interviews .

    Also, take seriously the hint that less expensive / midsize cities with lower salaries will result in more income . In Boston , a condo or house will cost about 5 times your annual salary . In San Antonio, on the other hand , a house costs only 2 or 3 times your annual salary . This makes Austin the least expensive major technology city in the country and the most fun as well !

  2. BY Turd Ferguson says:

    in support of the posts above: i see many job postings on job boards for months. with glut of labor in this economy? pulease. something’s fishy. companies and HR are vicious predators now these days. i don’t even bother applying for anything remotely fishy. i save my time for more legitimate posts/firms.

  3. BY Mark M. says:

    The costs of housing in the major cities CA are stratospheric, and the taxation is brutal, often surpassing NYC.

    –So, ignore that based on Job Listings? There’s the perspective of a job board for you:

    There are tons of listings in the NYC area too, and most of them are Indian body shops based out of Edison NJ that are resume trolling. Look at some of the companies other listings and see how often a “new” req get’s renewed each week with a different recruiters name or simply reposted.

    Why do recruiters do this? Because the job listing is for market research (mainly what is the going rate) and hopefully getting some internal contacts out of you from any references you hand over. Never give references prior to a confirmed interview! They can learn much more about your suitability from a tech screening than from talking to friends who’ve agreed to butter you up.

    Asking for references up front is a good indicator that you might be dealing with a shady organization. Another is getting a pathetic tech screening in a popular technology that is several versions out of date. Try grabbing random and unique strings out of the posting and searching across Dice for the same string. You’ll be surprised how many cut and paste job listings you’ll see. (Do you think they would do this if it were a real job?)

  4. BY Mark M. says:

    The costs of housing in the major cities CA are stratospheric, and the taxation is brutal, often surpassing NYC. So, ignore that based on Job Listings? There’s the perspective of a job board for you. There are tons of listings in the NYC area too, and most of them are Indian body shops based out of Edison NJ that are resume trolling. Look at some of the companies other listings and see how often a “new” req get’s renewed each week with a different recruiters name or simply reposted.

    Why do recruiters do this? Because the job listing is for market research (mainly what is the going rate) and hopefully getting some internal contacts out of you from any references you hand over. Never give references prior to a confirmed interview! They can learn much more about your suitability from a tech screening than from talking to friends who’ve agreed to butter you up.

  5. BY MattyMat says:

    I’m am an IT recruiter here in sunny Southern California— and we have no problem convincing contractors, or direct hires, to move to California— not only because of the lack of upper level IT positions elsewhere in the country— but purely because of the weather, as well as salaries are slowly becoming competetive again.

    Now… try to recruit Embedded Systems Engineers to Fargo, ND?? Good luck.

  6. BY Chris says:

    However, avoid cities that are too small, in a depressed area, or have limited technically-related opportunities, even if the cost of living is low.
    Yes, the thought of buying a 2500 square foot Victorian house, in a moderately good state of repair, for only $90K (nine and one zero) is very appealing. (And this is actually possible in some very small cities, in economically depressed, more remote areas.)
    But a really small city can be a trap. A small city might have only one company that needs your specialty, or only one company that is large enough to be doing significant hiring. If you want to settle down, buy a home, and raise a family while staying in one place; your alternative job options may be very limited.
    If the company you hire on with is the only game in town, they probably already realize this. Once you’ve bought a house and have become committed to the location; expect to see your pay raises and other perks become flat.

  7. BY dipak wagh says:

    i suggest india is best destination for services.

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