DiceTV: Conquer Your Fear of Awkward Pay Questions

 

Since knowledge and preparation conquer fear always research the market to determine  your value before an interview. The information will not only help you negotiate a better  deal but knowing if your pay is high or low for the market will help you anticipate and  prepare answers to questions about compensation.

The Script

Cat: Well hello job hunters. I’m preparing for a job interview, and as you can see, I’m perfectly relaxed. I used to be tense before interviews because I was terrified of questions like: What’s your current salary? Or, what’s the minimum salary you’ll accept?  Now I’m fearless, because I’ve conquered those awkward pay questions.

I’m Cat Miller, and this is DiceTV.

Since knowledge and preparation conquer fear always research the market to determine your value before an interview. The information will not only help you negotiate a better deal but knowing if your pay is high or low for the market will help you anticipate and prepare answers to questions about compensation.

If an interviewer immediately asks you to name your minimum salary, defer your answer until you have enough information. Explain that once you understand the performance expectations and compensation structure, you’ll be ready to discuss salary. You know, this might be the perfect time to turn the tables by asking the interviewer for the salary range or what employees with similar experience earn. This technique can be very effective in tense situations.

Always quote a range or average earnings when discussing compensation. If the interviewer tries to pin you down, explain that your compensation has varied or that your expectations are based upon market research, which includes data from many industries and companies.

Sometimes, there’s no avoiding questions about pay, so don’t be afraid to tell the truth. Whether you’ve been underpaid or maybe even a little overpaid for the market, explain the reasons before revealing your salary. Anticipate the interviewer’ concerns and address them proactively. If you’ll be satisfied earning a lower salary, explain why. If you deserve higher compensation, state your case. Then ask the interviewer for feedback.

Getting the issues out on the table may help you overcome your fear of those awkward pay questions once and for all.

I’m Cat Miller and this has been DiceTV. We now return you to your regular desktop.

DiceTV: Conquer Your Fear of Awkward Pay Questions

Comments

  1. BY RATAN says:

    I NEED THIS JOB

  2. BY RATAN says:

    I NEED THIS JOB

  3. BY Charley says:

    What are good resources for researching compensation, especially in this economic climate? Where can one look for good information? I have (very) successfully used the technique of asking the HR person what their salary range is for the position that I’m applying for. Having the range, I made some small talk and while doing quick math and made a salary request for the exact middle of the range. They didn’t accept that, but they went $1K lower. I was still $20K ahead of where I thought I would be! I was then let go in the recession; they kept only the people in the lower quadrant of the pay range. Can’t always count on HR giving up the pay range, so I need outside info to make an informed decision.

  4. BY Charley says:

    What are good resources for researching compensation, especially in this economic climate? Where can one look for good information? I have (very) successfully used the technique of asking the HR person what their salary range is for the position that I’m applying for. Having the range, I made some small talk and while doing quick math and made a salary request for the exact middle of the range. They didn’t accept that, but they went $1K lower. I was still $20K ahead of where I thought I would be! I was then let go in the recession; they kept only the people in the lower quadrant of the pay range. Can’t always count on HR giving up the pay range, so I need outside info to make an informed decision.

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