DiceTV: What to Do When You Find Yourself Embedded in a Business Unit

The Script

Cat: Prepare to embed. Jobs are migrating from IT departments into business units, so  business smarts and communication skills are important, even for a tech genius.

I’m Cat Miller, and this is DiceTV.

Each business unit has its own language and culture - and your new colleagues probably don’t speak geek. So when you find yourself in the new world of the business side, you’ve got to learn your way around.

Start with the acronyms and buzzwords used in your new group, and use them until they become part of your vocabulary. You’ll need practice to be a top notch communicator. So, hang out with others from the business unit to understand their culture and learn the lingo. For e-mails and written correspondence, ask someone you trust to give you pointers.

To be comfortable in your new environment, you’ll need some context. Study your company’s business plan, profit objectives and competitors to understand each unit’s role and challenges.

Lateral assignments or shadowing other employees are great ways to deepen your knowledge of the fundamentals, and spot opportunities for technological improvements.

Or, partner with someone from the unit and trade your technical expertise for their functional knowledge.

Finally, you’ll need to think critically in an embedded role in order to analyze problems and offer innovative solutions.

An appropriate course or book is the best way to learn the basics, but you’ll need practice to hone your skills. Compare your solutions to the experts in white papers and case studies, and work through business problems with an expert coach until you become comfortable with the process.

I’m Cat Miller, this has been DiceTV, and we now return you to your regular desktop.

Comments

  1. BY WebGuyBob says:

    OMG, Kat has ink? I would never have thought. However, she’s still hawt. :)

  2. BY WebGuyBob says:

    OMG, Kat has ink? I would never have thought. However, she’s still hawt. :)

  3. BY Rose says:

    I have to wonder why this is happening. Years ago, every dept. had their own IT depts, servers/data centers, support staffs, etc. Then they decided IT should all be centralized. From a Change Mgt. perspective, I think that’s the right way to be structured. I wonder if a trend toward decentralizing (again) will cause problems down the line, especially from a Change Mgt. perspective.

  4. BY Rose says:

    I have to wonder why this is happening. Years ago, every dept. had their own IT depts, servers/data centers, support staffs, etc. Then they decided IT should all be centralized. From a Change Mgt. perspective, I think that’s the right way to be structured. I wonder if a trend toward decentralizing (again) will cause problems down the line, especially from a Change Mgt. perspective.

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