Shortage of Ruby on Rails Experts in Greater Boston Area

When Pascal Rettig, founder of Cykod.com, went in search of Ruby on Rails developers, he came up empty handed. So he resorted to hiring two people and training them in-house. “I always see a lot of ads for those jobs but no one seems to find those types of developers. We couldn’t find anyone. The job market is weak but in this subset, there aren’t enough employees,” he says.

It’s a particular problem for companies in the Web development and design space. ROR is an open source framework for the Ruby programming language, which has been around since the 1990s but has matured in the last six years and reached critical mass. Greg Sterndale, who works at the Boston-based txteagle and belongs to the local Boston Ruby Group, recently conducted a survey and found 56 of the 66 respondents use ROR at their current job. At least 17 said their company is “extremely” likely to hire Ruby on Rails application developers, while another 12 were “quite” likely. “Many companies are looking for talent,” says Sterndale, “but they’re finding a lack of Ruby on Rails labor. Demand is high but supply is low.”

Sterndale acknowledges it’s a relatively new technology. But as executives start to hear about it, they’re seeking those who have the experience to get projects done using it. For many application developers, this seems like a good opportunity to get in on the ground floor of a new technology that’s gaining momentum. If you want more informaton on how to get started, go to http://bostonrb.org/

– Sonia R. Lelii

Comments

  1. BY Laura Bartkiewicz says:

    I’ve been having a difficult time finding any Ruby on Rails developer as well! Where is the best place to look? Are there any Ruby on Rails events that I could attend to meet more developers and network? I’d appreciate any advice. Thanks! Laura

  2. BY Laura Bartkiewicz says:

    I’ve been having a difficult time finding any Ruby on Rails developer as well! Where is the best place to look? Are there any Ruby on Rails events that I could attend to meet more developers and network? I’d appreciate any advice. Thanks! Laura

  3. BY Mario says:

    The Ruby community is actually quite small . Many of them are Java refugees and all are very sharp . I don’t think they’re “hiding” anywhere, they’re just actually rare .

    You might have better luck doing what Cykod.com did – find good competent people who can code then let them pick up Ruby and Rails on their own .

  4. BY Mario says:

    The Ruby community is actually quite small . Many of them are Java refugees and all are very sharp . I don’t think they’re “hiding” anywhere, they’re just actually rare .

    You might have better luck doing what Cykod.com did – find good competent people who can code then let them pick up Ruby and Rails on their own .

  5. BY Ben says:

    What industries are getting into R&R and why is it more or less versatile then just designing via other web technologies? I’ve only recently started exploring this, but how is it different from just implementing another web database with pertinent application architecture? Is Ruby the new Python or Perl, or is it just a fad? Has anyone integrated a different database behind R&R other then MySQL? These could be rhetorical questions I’m listing for myself to explore :P

  6. BY Ben says:

    What industries are getting into R&R and why is it more or less versatile then just designing via other web technologies? I’ve only recently started exploring this, but how is it different from just implementing another web database with pertinent application architecture? Is Ruby the new Python or Perl, or is it just a fad? Has anyone integrated a different database behind R&R other then MySQL? These could be rhetorical questions I’m listing for myself to explore :P

  7. BY Ben says:

    What industries are getting into R&R and why is it more or less versatile then just designing via other web technologies? I’ve only recently started exploring this, but how is it different from just implementing another web database with pertinent application architecture? Is Ruby the new Python or Perl, or is it just a fad? Has anyone integrated a different database behind R&R other then MySQL? These could be rhetorical questions I’m listing for myself to explore :P

  8. BY Ben says:

    What industries are getting into R&R and why is it more or less versatile then just designing via other web technologies? I’ve only recently started exploring this, but how is it different from just implementing another web database with pertinent application architecture? Is Ruby the new Python or Perl, or is it just a fad? Has anyone integrated a different database behind R&R other then MySQL? These could be rhetorical questions I’m listing for myself to explore :P

  9. BY Sonia Lelii says:

    Hi Laura:

    I referenced the Boston Ruby Group in my blog post. You should give them a try for contacts. Or, if you like, you can give me a ring at 508-879-2810 and I could give you some contacts that may point you in the right direction.

    Yours, Sonia Lelii

  10. BY Sonia Lelii says:

    Hi Laura:

    I referenced the Boston Ruby Group in my blog post. You should give them a try for contacts. Or, if you like, you can give me a ring at 508-879-2810 and I could give you some contacts that may point you in the right direction.

    Yours, Sonia Lelii

  11. BY Laura says:

    Thanks Sonia! I’m calling you now :)

  12. BY Laura says:

    Thanks Sonia! I’m calling you now :)

  13. BY Brian says:

    Ben,
    It’s not a fad. I’ve been using it for 4 years at my company for all my projects. I used to do .NET but RoR delivers results quicker, and the results are more robust thanks to the built in testing tools that make test driven development practical. And it doesn’t hurt that I can wow my CIO with mobile views of my apps that are a snap to put together. It’s possible to use other databases other than MySQL. I’ve used Microsoft SQL Server just so I could use Microsoft Reporting Services to generate fancy reports. RoR is great for delivering business apps behind the firewall. I suspect there are a lot of people like me who have been quietly moving their company in this direction.
    Start at the beginning: http://rubyonrails.org. Good luck with your search.

  14. BY Brian says:

    Ben,
    It’s not a fad. I’ve been using it for 4 years at my company for all my projects. I used to do .NET but RoR delivers results quicker, and the results are more robust thanks to the built in testing tools that make test driven development practical. And it doesn’t hurt that I can wow my CIO with mobile views of my apps that are a snap to put together. It’s possible to use other databases other than MySQL. I’ve used Microsoft SQL Server just so I could use Microsoft Reporting Services to generate fancy reports. RoR is great for delivering business apps behind the firewall. I suspect there are a lot of people like me who have been quietly moving their company in this direction.
    Start at the beginning: http://rubyonrails.org. Good luck with your search.

  15. BY Marc Lacoursiere says:

    I agree with Brian. After 9 years doing .NET programming, I am actually moving towards Ruby on Rails. Its architecture is more structured and it’s a good thing in my experience. All Rails projects have the same base, which makes it easier to catch up on existing ones.

    Look no further if you need Rails developers. I am looking forward to find customers who need programmers with that kind of skills.

  16. BY Marc Lacoursiere says:

    I agree with Brian. After 9 years doing .NET programming, I am actually moving towards Ruby on Rails. Its architecture is more structured and it’s a good thing in my experience. All Rails projects have the same base, which makes it easier to catch up on existing ones.

    Look no further if you need Rails developers. I am looking forward to find customers who need programmers with that kind of skills.

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