Workplace Rules for the New Economy

It’s hard to win the game, if the rules change during halftime. But that’s the challenge confronting workers according to Rick Newman, writing for U.S. News and World Report. He contends that the recession begat an era of permanent economic volatility in which employers will have the upper hand. Workers must understand these new rules and plan accordingly in order to succeed in a workplace that offers little job security. Many of his observations will resonate with IT professionals, so read the list and then make adjustments in your career game plan.

Rule 1. You don’t deserve a job. Anybody expecting good pay for mediocre work will end up deeply disappointed. The winners will be those who hustle, do more than asked, and occasionally swallow their pride.
Rule 2. You don’t know enough. A few decades ago, a college or technical degree and some regular on-the-job training amounted to plenty of education for most professions. Not any more. Technology changes faster than most people can keep up with these days, and workers relying on the same old skills are more likely than ever to be displaced by young Turks with fresher learning.
Rule 3. Less stuff equals more freedom. Spending less and saving more will raise the odds that you can survive a crisis – or pounce on an opportunity.
Rule 4. Prepare for many turns. Changing fields or careers might mean more training or education, but multidisciplinary learning will be a major asset in the future.
Rule 5. Entrepreneurs have an advantage. Employers increasingly value innovative workers who come up with better or cheaper ways to get the job done. So an entrepreneurial attitude can set you apart even if you work for somebody else.
Rule 6. Don’t get addicted to your paycheck. You might earn more some years, less in other years, and go up and down your whole working life.
Rule 7. Loving what you do pays off. Lots of people seek passion in their work, but many end up playing it safe and going with a steady paycheck. That’s increasingly risky. Getting ahead in the future will likely mean working harder and longer, which is okay if you love your work and feel like you’re building something valuable, but awfully tough if you’re just running the clock.

Do you have a new workplace rule to add to Newman’s list?

Leslie Stevens-Huffman

Comments

  1. BY Brian Tuttle says:

    No matter where you go there you are.

  2. BY Brian Tuttle says:

    No matter where you go there you are.

  3. BY peter says:

    experienced will be an advantage with a little knowledge of whats the latest tech out there also helps, though loving your chosen field of interest and spend most of your life perfecting the profession does not mean you’ll be on the hook with the employers, the simple rule now in getting employed nowadays is who you know not what you know, (correct me if i’m wrong)

  4. BY peter says:

    experienced will be an advantage with a little knowledge of whats the latest tech out there also helps, though loving your chosen field of interest and spend most of your life perfecting the profession does not mean you’ll be on the hook with the employers, the simple rule now in getting employed nowadays is who you know not what you know, (correct me if i’m wrong)

  5. BY esj says:

    rule 2: this just feeds into the educational certificate complex. You spend a lot of your personal time and money to gain certificates for narrow niche products. The process trains you to only think about what you’re taught instead of learning broader-based knowledge which lets you solve problems for decades. On the other hand, employers cannot see or understand broad-based knowledge. They look for the certificate or narrow trade knowledge which insurers to constantly churning workforce.

    rule 6: potentially, a better way to say this is that what you get paid does not define what you are worth. You are far more valuable to your family, your friends than you are to your employer. Spend your energy with those who value you. you will not say on your deathbed “I wish I spent more time at work”.

    7: flip it around, do what you love. you can’t force yourself to love what you do especially when employers demand long hours away from those you love. but when you do work with what you love, don’t let it drive you to work long hours or ignore your family. If possible, keep the work that you love for yourself and that will make you the happiest of all.

  6. BY esj says:

    rule 2: this just feeds into the educational certificate complex. You spend a lot of your personal time and money to gain certificates for narrow niche products. The process trains you to only think about what you’re taught instead of learning broader-based knowledge which lets you solve problems for decades. On the other hand, employers cannot see or understand broad-based knowledge. They look for the certificate or narrow trade knowledge which insurers to constantly churning workforce.

    rule 6: potentially, a better way to say this is that what you get paid does not define what you are worth. You are far more valuable to your family, your friends than you are to your employer. Spend your energy with those who value you. you will not say on your deathbed “I wish I spent more time at work”.

    7: flip it around, do what you love. you can’t force yourself to love what you do especially when employers demand long hours away from those you love. but when you do work with what you love, don’t let it drive you to work long hours or ignore your family. If possible, keep the work that you love for yourself and that will make you the happiest of all.

  7. BY Robert Gumm says:

    My thoughts on higher education in the workforce. I have an IT Degree. Spent 40K + to get it. Now after all of that, we learn we have to be “certified”. Thats a few thousand more. Schools should have us with certificates before we graduate. They are they instructors, why don’t they teach it there???

  8. BY Robert Gumm says:

    My thoughts on higher education in the workforce. I have an IT Degree. Spent 40K + to get it. Now after all of that, we learn we have to be “certified”. Thats a few thousand more. Schools should have us with certificates before we graduate. They are they instructors, why don’t they teach it there???

  9. BY Nancy Bir says:

    Employment today is based on the age-old rule to give value for monies received. Best thought is to agree to work you enjoy and associate yourself with respectful employers. Environment and challenging work plays the BIG role in worker attitude.

  10. BY Nancy Bir says:

    Employment today is based on the age-old rule to give value for monies received. Best thought is to agree to work you enjoy and associate yourself with respectful employers. Environment and challenging work plays the BIG role in worker attitude.

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