DiceTV: What Tech Leaders Really Think About Gen Y’s Ideas

 

Generation Y was going to handle work its way. The only problem is a lot of others aren’t so convinced. If you’re a Millennial, you should hear what Cat has to say, or read this.

Comments

  1. BY tttt says:

    I have to disagree. 3 yrs or more on a job. Who does that anymore especially when you want to advance career wise. I will only stay that long at a job when I am already were I want to be in my career. Translation It just says I am a very motivated individual and I don’t just sit and settle for year on a job with no advancement years and years just because a employer does want to promote. There is another job waiting out there who will. Communication == These companies should be evolving to the new technology that is out there. That means instant message, email, and so on as long as it is not abused. Too many old prunes out there at these companies that refuse to use it. I’m sorry but I am not going to keep getting up from my desk and interrupting the other work I am performing to keep trying to meet you face to face for something not critical when it can be sent through or responded by email. That is a pet peeve of mines and disruptive.

  2. BY tttt says:

    I have to disagree. 3 yrs or more on a job. Who does that anymore especially when you want to advance career wise. I will only stay that long at a job when I am already were I want to be in my career. Translation It just says I am a very motivated individual and I don’t just sit and settle for year on a job with no advancement years and years just because a employer does want to promote. There is another job waiting out there who will. Communication == These companies should be evolving to the new technology that is out there. That means instant message, email, and so on as long as it is not abused. Too many old prunes out there at these companies that refuse to use it. I’m sorry but I am not going to keep getting up from my desk and interrupting the other work I am performing to keep trying to meet you face to face for something not critical when it can be sent through or responded by email. That is a pet peeve of mines and disruptive.

  3. BY Tim says:

    Seems like dice likes censorship. LOL

  4. BY Tim says:

    Seems like dice likes censorship. LOL

  5. BY Johnny says:

    Gen Y has a egotistical assumption of entitlement. They do not want to work for what should be earned. You won’t advance in your career by job hoping; companies make a monetary investment in you when you are hired. If you leave the company in a year, in many cases they lose on that investment, especially when it is someone like the job hopper above that thinks he is going to be the CEO of a large corporation in 5 years. Get real and grow up!

  6. BY Johnny says:

    Gen Y has a egotistical assumption of entitlement. They do not want to work for what should be earned. You won’t advance in your career by job hoping; companies make a monetary investment in you when you are hired. If you leave the company in a year, in many cases they lose on that investment, especially when it is someone like the job hopper above that thinks he is going to be the CEO of a large corporation in 5 years. Get real and grow up!

  7. BY Bill says:

    I agree. Gen Y thinks they know everything. Weather they like it or not, the general rules of business don’t change that much. The more experienced understand and Gen Y needs to understand they don’t. This is especially true during tough times.

    Btw: Gen Y? Adding one to Gen X? Not very original.

  8. BY Bill says:

    I agree. Gen Y thinks they know everything. Weather they like it or not, the general rules of business don’t change that much. The more experienced understand and Gen Y needs to understand they don’t. This is especially true during tough times.

    Btw: Gen Y? Adding one to Gen X? Not very original.

  9. BY Siggy says:

    Im neither Gen X nor Gen Y , but sort of in between the MTV Gen, and I guess its a blessing. Gen Y wants to live life their way , while previous generations had a different mindset. Part of Gen Y’s thinking is rooted in the thrill of taking on newer challenges once they get a feeling of comfort in a place.. I’m really comfy working with Gen Y because they have hope and enthusiasm.. Baby boomers and Gen X’ers on the other hand are at a stage of life where stability matters and hence are more comfortable doing things in ‘Time Honored’ ways.. But if they take a moment to look back to their teens and youth years , they will remember the world was very different back then compared to the relative chaos of today’s job markets .. Accept change or stagnate.. Don’t Kill the hopes of younger workers.. That’s the bottom line..

  10. BY Siggy says:

    Im neither Gen X nor Gen Y , but sort of in between the MTV Gen, and I guess its a blessing. Gen Y wants to live life their way , while previous generations had a different mindset. Part of Gen Y’s thinking is rooted in the thrill of taking on newer challenges once they get a feeling of comfort in a place.. I’m really comfy working with Gen Y because they have hope and enthusiasm.. Baby boomers and Gen X’ers on the other hand are at a stage of life where stability matters and hence are more comfortable doing things in ‘Time Honored’ ways.. But if they take a moment to look back to their teens and youth years , they will remember the world was very different back then compared to the relative chaos of today’s job markets .. Accept change or stagnate.. Don’t Kill the hopes of younger workers.. That’s the bottom line..

  11. BY Corey says:

    The absolute lack of perspective coming from some of you is amazing. Also many of your post read a lot more like assigning your own frustrations to the new generation than any sort of objective assessment.

    Things to remember about “us” (who gets to name the generations anyway?)

    1st – we started our adolescence with explosions and war, paranoia, and political radicalization unlike any time in our history (and without the recourse’s of the “hippies”

    2nd – We were raised (by you older generations) in the 90′s where you all foolishly thought that the market would keep expanding to infinity. We were brought into your insecure economic fallacies.

    3rd – Those of us in generation “Y” who graduated University last year did so in THE WORST YEAR IN THE HISTORY OF HIGHER EDUCATION. Yes, worse than the depression, and way worse than the 80′s so get over yourselves. http://tinyurl.com/7razyj

    4th – We’re adapting to the world we have inherited, just as you all did, and I for one have a bone to pick with how you baby boomers and hippies are leaving things…..

  12. BY Corey says:

    The absolute lack of perspective coming from some of you is amazing. Also many of your post read a lot more like assigning your own frustrations to the new generation than any sort of objective assessment.

    Things to remember about “us” (who gets to name the generations anyway?)

    1st – we started our adolescence with explosions and war, paranoia, and political radicalization unlike any time in our history (and without the recourse’s of the “hippies”

    2nd – We were raised (by you older generations) in the 90′s where you all foolishly thought that the market would keep expanding to infinity. We were brought into your insecure economic fallacies.

    3rd – Those of us in generation “Y” who graduated University last year did so in THE WORST YEAR IN THE HISTORY OF HIGHER EDUCATION. Yes, worse than the depression, and way worse than the 80′s so get over yourselves. http://tinyurl.com/7razyj

    4th – We’re adapting to the world we have inherited, just as you all did, and I for one have a bone to pick with how you baby boomers and hippies are leaving things…..

  13. BY Jay Zee says:

    I just hope this gal doesn’t quit HER day job to be in entertainment. Whiney.. where is that from… Minnesota?

  14. BY Jay Zee says:

    I just hope this gal doesn’t quit HER day job to be in entertainment. Whiney.. where is that from… Minnesota?

  15. BY DBB says:

    I have seen this issue from both sides. I’ve been in IT near 30 years. I started on mainframe at a State Agency. There is a reason Gov Agencies are poor IT performers without consultants. All opportunities for advancement are strictly based on seniority. Hard work is rewarded with “take a test, get on a list and we’ll see what can be done for you in a year”. You don’t want to hear that at 20-something. I lefty for private industry and consulting work. I used to jump every 3-5 years for the same reasons as ttt. After awhile employers look at you as someone who won’t stick around long and you get less offers. 30 years later
    you start thinking about security. I found past co-workers who stayed when I left and are now near retirement with 25-30 years paid into a retirement system with the State. There technical skills have changed much. Who’s better off?

  16. BY DBB says:

    I have seen this issue from both sides. I’ve been in IT near 30 years. I started on mainframe at a State Agency. There is a reason Gov Agencies are poor IT performers without consultants. All opportunities for advancement are strictly based on seniority. Hard work is rewarded with “take a test, get on a list and we’ll see what can be done for you in a year”. You don’t want to hear that at 20-something. I lefty for private industry and consulting work. I used to jump every 3-5 years for the same reasons as ttt. After awhile employers look at you as someone who won’t stick around long and you get less offers. 30 years later
    you start thinking about security. I found past co-workers who stayed when I left and are now near retirement with 25-30 years paid into a retirement system with the State. There technical skills have changed much. Who’s better off?

  17. BY Joe from La Mirada says:

    I thought this generation was going to be called the Oprah Generation of O Gen because of all there mommies who stayed at home and watched a women who never had children.

  18. BY Joe from La Mirada says:

    I thought this generation was going to be called the Oprah Generation of O Gen because of all there mommies who stayed at home and watched a women who never had children.

  19. BY Mark from Management says:

    It’s about time someone from their own generation said it. I’ve hired 2 “Millennial’s” into a Helpdesk / Desktop support group and I can tell you I was under-whelmed with the work ethic and over-whelmed with the arrogance. They didn’t make it past the 6 month probationary period. It’s not like there aren’t people who know IT actually looking to work for their paycheck.

  20. BY Mark from Management says:

    It’s about time someone from their own generation said it. I’ve hired 2 “Millennial’s” into a Helpdesk / Desktop support group and I can tell you I was under-whelmed with the work ethic and over-whelmed with the arrogance. They didn’t make it past the 6 month probationary period. It’s not like there aren’t people who know IT actually looking to work for their paycheck.

  21. BY Owen says:

    Always good to hire Gen Y’ers. Better get them while they still know everything! :-)

    Great video, and excellent ideas. As a hiring manager for many years, I am all for the new ways of thinking, and doing things, but it is a WORK, not play time, which is why they call it a JOB and not a PARTY!

    And to the job hoppers: Sorry, 9 months do not compare to 3 years. If I see you job hop for the sake of job hopping, I will not hire you. Why would I want to hire someone who I know is likely, in a year, to leave? That means I have to hire and train someone else for the position all over again? Sorry, as a hiring manager, if you do not have a good reason for 5 jobs in 4 years (for example) you resume goes in the file, and you don’t get a call.

  22. BY Owen says:

    Always good to hire Gen Y’ers. Better get them while they still know everything! :-)

    Great video, and excellent ideas. As a hiring manager for many years, I am all for the new ways of thinking, and doing things, but it is a WORK, not play time, which is why they call it a JOB and not a PARTY!

    And to the job hoppers: Sorry, 9 months do not compare to 3 years. If I see you job hop for the sake of job hopping, I will not hire you. Why would I want to hire someone who I know is likely, in a year, to leave? That means I have to hire and train someone else for the position all over again? Sorry, as a hiring manager, if you do not have a good reason for 5 jobs in 4 years (for example) you resume goes in the file, and you don’t get a call.

  23. BY Owen says:

    Seriously Cory, not one ounce of blame to put on yourself? I would say time to start accounting for yourself and stop blaming everyone else for your problems. Those of us older than you inherited world wars, cold wars, bank failures, and depressions from our parents, and a lack of the wonderful technology and access you have today, and we did fine, thank you. I think you need to stop blaming everyone else for why things may be hard for your generation. Suck it up and, as you said, get over it. Your opinion may vary!

    BUT, as a hiring manager, those excuses would not fly. So, if you want that next job, you may need to burry those feelings a bit deeper pal.

  24. BY Owen says:

    Seriously Cory, not one ounce of blame to put on yourself? I would say time to start accounting for yourself and stop blaming everyone else for your problems. Those of us older than you inherited world wars, cold wars, bank failures, and depressions from our parents, and a lack of the wonderful technology and access you have today, and we did fine, thank you. I think you need to stop blaming everyone else for why things may be hard for your generation. Suck it up and, as you said, get over it. Your opinion may vary!

    BUT, as a hiring manager, those excuses would not fly. So, if you want that next job, you may need to burry those feelings a bit deeper pal.

  25. BY wahr says:

    I’m an early gen y, and i’m tired of this one-sided old line about “generation y feels entitled”, “generation y is lazy”.
    This is garbage and you know it. We worked our youth away in school just like you, and just like you we require training and experience to perform at the same level as seasoned vets. Where do we get that experience when nobody will give it to us? “But they won’t return our investment in training” you say, well you reap what you sow. We in gen Y grew up bombarded with news of whole departments of 10 and 20 year old loyalists being sacked because it was cheaper in India. You have to reward loyalty if you want your employees to demonstrate it.

  26. BY wahr says:

    I’m an early gen y, and i’m tired of this one-sided old line about “generation y feels entitled”, “generation y is lazy”.
    This is garbage and you know it. We worked our youth away in school just like you, and just like you we require training and experience to perform at the same level as seasoned vets. Where do we get that experience when nobody will give it to us? “But they won’t return our investment in training” you say, well you reap what you sow. We in gen Y grew up bombarded with news of whole departments of 10 and 20 year old loyalists being sacked because it was cheaper in India. You have to reward loyalty if you want your employees to demonstrate it.

  27. BY Jo says:

    Well.. I’m not sure that the points raised are a Gen Y or a Gen X thing. But they may be a “time of life” thing. I was a young whippersnapper Boomer IT chick back in the 70′s. We did job hop without repercussion. We didn’t have to look for work; recruiters by the dozens came looking for us. We could cherry pick projects and we could expect quick promotions. If not, we’d just head out the door.

    Were we selfish and impressed with our own self-importance? Well.. yes!! We were young. We were also experiencing a huge boom in IT hiring that went on for a good 40 years… from the early 60′s to the dot com crash of 2000. No competition from off-shoring or H1B workers.

    So I don’t believe that previous generations necessarily had a different mind set. The Baby boomers were the first generation who really lived life “their way”. We just…. grew up… had kids… and watched the middle class start to collapse in the 2000′s.

  28. BY Jo says:

    Well.. I’m not sure that the points raised are a Gen Y or a Gen X thing. But they may be a “time of life” thing. I was a young whippersnapper Boomer IT chick back in the 70′s. We did job hop without repercussion. We didn’t have to look for work; recruiters by the dozens came looking for us. We could cherry pick projects and we could expect quick promotions. If not, we’d just head out the door.

    Were we selfish and impressed with our own self-importance? Well.. yes!! We were young. We were also experiencing a huge boom in IT hiring that went on for a good 40 years… from the early 60′s to the dot com crash of 2000. No competition from off-shoring or H1B workers.

    So I don’t believe that previous generations necessarily had a different mind set. The Baby boomers were the first generation who really lived life “their way”. We just…. grew up… had kids… and watched the middle class start to collapse in the 2000′s.

  29. BY Independent says:

    This reminds me of my own attitude when I was just starting out in the business world in the early 1980s. I worked for about 15 years as a contractor, and that was a good fit. I do understand the attitude, since it was mine too. It’s part of the arrogance of being under the age of 35 and thinking you already know everything — it really isn’t the exclusive property of Generation Y. I work in my own, small company now so I don’t have to deal with getting a “promotion”. I wear about 20 hats, so there is little danger of boredom (the danger of burnout is much greater). The few years that I worked for a formal organization where I had to play the game of company politics were painful, and ultimately not worth it. But I keep up the contacts from my contracting years, because you never know where your next client is coming from.

  30. BY Independent says:

    This reminds me of my own attitude when I was just starting out in the business world in the early 1980s. I worked for about 15 years as a contractor, and that was a good fit. I do understand the attitude, since it was mine too. It’s part of the arrogance of being under the age of 35 and thinking you already know everything — it really isn’t the exclusive property of Generation Y. I work in my own, small company now so I don’t have to deal with getting a “promotion”. I wear about 20 hats, so there is little danger of boredom (the danger of burnout is much greater). The few years that I worked for a formal organization where I had to play the game of company politics were painful, and ultimately not worth it. But I keep up the contacts from my contracting years, because you never know where your next client is coming from.

  31. BY Phil says:

    I am a Boomer. 1st: The moment you put yourself ahead of everyone else you have created a future failure(or failures). 2nd: This “do it my way” attitude is present in all generations; perhaps more so with Gen Y. 3rd: Learn from your mistakes (this attitude is one of them) or you are doomed to repeat them. 4th: Even if you are successful with this attitude, you are less of a success than you could be. Anyone successful with this attitude is either an entrepreneur, has worked themselves up the ladder following “the man’s rules”, a contractor with only easy clients or homeless. Unless you have capital and the smarts to make it work for you, approaching employment with a “do it my way” attitude is a path to failure. Besides, the thing that makes most people truly successful is putting internal and external CUSTOMERS FIRST.

  32. BY Phil says:

    I am a Boomer. 1st: The moment you put yourself ahead of everyone else you have created a future failure(or failures). 2nd: This “do it my way” attitude is present in all generations; perhaps more so with Gen Y. 3rd: Learn from your mistakes (this attitude is one of them) or you are doomed to repeat them. 4th: Even if you are successful with this attitude, you are less of a success than you could be. Anyone successful with this attitude is either an entrepreneur, has worked themselves up the ladder following “the man’s rules”, a contractor with only easy clients or homeless. Unless you have capital and the smarts to make it work for you, approaching employment with a “do it my way” attitude is a path to failure. Besides, the thing that makes most people truly successful is putting internal and external CUSTOMERS FIRST.

  33. BY Geoff says:

    I agree about the tips, but one thing I think should have been mentioned is the mindset the tech sector has toward Gen Y already, especially in the higher echelon. I’ve heard the CTO for Sony Pictures Entertainment, Mitch Singer, openly berate Gen Y as lazy and not willing to do the work in interviews, public comments and panel discussions at CES and TelcoTV.

    People like Johnny (above) make it seem like that mindset is already pretty set in the work place, something that would make it tough for any group of people to deal with or want to deal with.

  34. BY Geoff says:

    I agree about the tips, but one thing I think should have been mentioned is the mindset the tech sector has toward Gen Y already, especially in the higher echelon. I’ve heard the CTO for Sony Pictures Entertainment, Mitch Singer, openly berate Gen Y as lazy and not willing to do the work in interviews, public comments and panel discussions at CES and TelcoTV.

    People like Johnny (above) make it seem like that mindset is already pretty set in the work place, something that would make it tough for any group of people to deal with or want to deal with.

  35. BY Jim says:

    Some interesting comments; it’s easy to tell which ones came from the millenials.

    Gen-y’ers are no different than previous generations – impatient to run the world and solve all of its problems with their “easy” solutions. The problem is that, despite all of their pronouncements about how great they are, or how motivated they are, or how well they command the newest technology, there’s one thing millenials don’t have that’s vital to becoming a solid professional in any discipline – experience.

    Take furniture-making as an analogy. A person can read 20 books on making furniture, and have all the tools, but an experienced furniture maker will always create better furniture than a novice. The difference is experience. And you can’t get that from technical knowledge, a degree, or an attitude. Intelligence, knowledge, and even the best work ethic are no substitute for solid experience. And solid experience only comes in the long run.

  36. BY Jim says:

    Some interesting comments; it’s easy to tell which ones came from the millenials.

    Gen-y’ers are no different than previous generations – impatient to run the world and solve all of its problems with their “easy” solutions. The problem is that, despite all of their pronouncements about how great they are, or how motivated they are, or how well they command the newest technology, there’s one thing millenials don’t have that’s vital to becoming a solid professional in any discipline – experience.

    Take furniture-making as an analogy. A person can read 20 books on making furniture, and have all the tools, but an experienced furniture maker will always create better furniture than a novice. The difference is experience. And you can’t get that from technical knowledge, a degree, or an attitude. Intelligence, knowledge, and even the best work ethic are no substitute for solid experience. And solid experience only comes in the long run.

  37. BY IT PM says:

    I’m an IT Project Manager and a Boomer. Just started working with a Gen Y recently out of college. She has an Admin job. Routine stuff. Got her foot in the door because, she has a fairly good resume showing initiative. Limited experience, but she is just out of college (heh…. everyone has to start someplace). So I¿ll give her a chance and explain what I¿d not expect her to know or be able to solve. But,
    1) When I give her an activity to work on I have to see it done quickly and done well (can¿t teach work ethic);
    2) When I give her a problem to solve, I have to see reasoning, initiative and problem solving skills right up front (can¿t teach problem solving);
    3) When I ask her to follow-up on something with someone there had better be polite assertiveness (have to get along with people or your out on limb all by yourself. Don¿t get complex projects done that way);
    4) She has many things to learn – You expect it. But, if I have to repeat myself and keep explaining, don¿t have time for it (back to that work ethic again and initiative in learning).
    So its up to her. She has her foot in the door and can make this position what she wants it to be. The more initiative and skills she demonstrates, the more responsibility she will get. And if she does not, then its dead end boring work for her. If she does the boring work, then she will stay for a while. And if she doesn¿t its bye bye.

  38. BY IT PM says:

    I’m an IT Project Manager and a Boomer. Just started working with a Gen Y recently out of college. She has an Admin job. Routine stuff. Got her foot in the door because, she has a fairly good resume showing initiative. Limited experience, but she is just out of college (heh…. everyone has to start someplace). So I¿ll give her a chance and explain what I¿d not expect her to know or be able to solve. But,
    1) When I give her an activity to work on I have to see it done quickly and done well (can¿t teach work ethic);
    2) When I give her a problem to solve, I have to see reasoning, initiative and problem solving skills right up front (can¿t teach problem solving);
    3) When I ask her to follow-up on something with someone there had better be polite assertiveness (have to get along with people or your out on limb all by yourself. Don¿t get complex projects done that way);
    4) She has many things to learn – You expect it. But, if I have to repeat myself and keep explaining, don¿t have time for it (back to that work ethic again and initiative in learning).
    So its up to her. She has her foot in the door and can make this position what she wants it to be. The more initiative and skills she demonstrates, the more responsibility she will get. And if she does not, then its dead end boring work for her. If she does the boring work, then she will stay for a while. And if she doesn¿t its bye bye.

  39. BY Shannon says:

    I love the entitlement thinking of Gen Y…makes it easier for me [proudly a Gen X'er] to get the job…for more money. I have the benefit of experience and some enthusiasm to make me a better candidate.

  40. BY Shannon says:

    I love the entitlement thinking of Gen Y…makes it easier for me [proudly a Gen X'er] to get the job…for more money. I have the benefit of experience and some enthusiasm to make me a better candidate.

  41. BY Walter Miller says:

    Whether its generation Y or X it makes no difference the bottom line is that the company wants to make a profit. Add to that the CEO motivation in determining their outrageous bonuses is causing a change in how Companies view an employee. Years ago there was respect for the employee and companies valued their opinions and contributions. You were basically treated like family and unless you really messed up were a long term employee. Over time the desire for larger profits and CEO bonuses started changing the way businesses have run. It seems that all the CEOs began attending seminars on how to run a business and when they got back they all stated to institute the same ideas. One time it was carpe diem, then synergy, micro-managing, and more recently outsourcing. Corporate respect for their employee diminished as well as the reverse respect from the employee. I don¿t care how much education or qualified you are it really makes no difference. It all boils down to how well the boss likes you or if by outsourcing / downsizing whether its good or not for the long term health of the company affects the current bonuses of a CEO. I have known many of good companies go under because of greed by a CEO rather than product they produced. I would suspect these days more money is made by suing for patent infringements than by producing product.

    As for employee loyalty there is none. Its all about getting a job and making money. Like business the more money you can make the better. So jump and take the better paying job. There is no longer job satisfaction or career path. Humans like to be creative and be recognized for self worth. We are always striving to do our part to change the world. Corporations treat humans as just things to manipulate and discard. If they looked at some of the real capabilities they may be surprised. So if generation X or Y has an attitude problem just look at the source.

    Lastly there is serious discrimination regarding age, race, religion, and sex. This applies to people over the age of 45, women who are not paid equivalent to their male counter parts, blacks because of their color, and also due to your religious beliefs. During my job searching days and I was over 45 I was told by one HR individual most companies except as contractor wont hire me due to the increase in cost in their medical premiums. Another job for quality inspector I applied for was rejected because I didnt not have over 3 years experience yet a younger sexy female friend of mine with no quality experience (said they train her) was hired and got the job. So with all these how to sessions that various job training centers offer it all boils down to being in the right place at the right time.

  42. BY Walter Miller says:

    Whether its generation Y or X it makes no difference the bottom line is that the company wants to make a profit. Add to that the CEO motivation in determining their outrageous bonuses is causing a change in how Companies view an employee. Years ago there was respect for the employee and companies valued their opinions and contributions. You were basically treated like family and unless you really messed up were a long term employee. Over time the desire for larger profits and CEO bonuses started changing the way businesses have run. It seems that all the CEOs began attending seminars on how to run a business and when they got back they all stated to institute the same ideas. One time it was carpe diem, then synergy, micro-managing, and more recently outsourcing. Corporate respect for their employee diminished as well as the reverse respect from the employee. I don¿t care how much education or qualified you are it really makes no difference. It all boils down to how well the boss likes you or if by outsourcing / downsizing whether its good or not for the long term health of the company affects the current bonuses of a CEO. I have known many of good companies go under because of greed by a CEO rather than product they produced. I would suspect these days more money is made by suing for patent infringements than by producing product.

    As for employee loyalty there is none. Its all about getting a job and making money. Like business the more money you can make the better. So jump and take the better paying job. There is no longer job satisfaction or career path. Humans like to be creative and be recognized for self worth. We are always striving to do our part to change the world. Corporations treat humans as just things to manipulate and discard. If they looked at some of the real capabilities they may be surprised. So if generation X or Y has an attitude problem just look at the source.

    Lastly there is serious discrimination regarding age, race, religion, and sex. This applies to people over the age of 45, women who are not paid equivalent to their male counter parts, blacks because of their color, and also due to your religious beliefs. During my job searching days and I was over 45 I was told by one HR individual most companies except as contractor wont hire me due to the increase in cost in their medical premiums. Another job for quality inspector I applied for was rejected because I didnt not have over 3 years experience yet a younger sexy female friend of mine with no quality experience (said they train her) was hired and got the job. So with all these how to sessions that various job training centers offer it all boils down to being in the right place at the right time.

  43. BY Dave says:

    I think you’re missing something, tttt. If you come across as “If I don’t get what I want, when I want it”, nobody will touch you. It won’t take long either; your history will put a red light on you. BTW, it’s not anyone else’s fault but your own.
    Most companies don’t mind if you gain responsibility, move to different areas, etc. as long as you stay within the company. You may have to move around a bit before going up, especially with the larger businesses, but once you do you’ll know more about the business than if you just went straight up right away.
    Second, “old prunes” is not the way anymore. There are people running companies in their 40′s and 50′s. In order to get new technology, there has to be a good business reason why. You don’t spend money on bleeding-edge just because it’s cool. It has to fall in line with the corporate strategy. The dot.coms of the 90′s spent a lot of money on new technology; look what happened. Easy formula – if you spend more than you earn, you’re not in business long.

  44. BY Dave says:

    I think you’re missing something, tttt. If you come across as “If I don’t get what I want, when I want it”, nobody will touch you. It won’t take long either; your history will put a red light on you. BTW, it’s not anyone else’s fault but your own.
    Most companies don’t mind if you gain responsibility, move to different areas, etc. as long as you stay within the company. You may have to move around a bit before going up, especially with the larger businesses, but once you do you’ll know more about the business than if you just went straight up right away.
    Second, “old prunes” is not the way anymore. There are people running companies in their 40′s and 50′s. In order to get new technology, there has to be a good business reason why. You don’t spend money on bleeding-edge just because it’s cool. It has to fall in line with the corporate strategy. The dot.coms of the 90′s spent a lot of money on new technology; look what happened. Easy formula – if you spend more than you earn, you’re not in business long.

  45. BY James Savik says:

    I hate Gen Y brats. They think they are hot shit but they can’t read, write, spell, do math or solve problems. They are useless to me and I don’t hire them.

  46. BY James Savik says:

    I hate Gen Y brats. They think they are hot shit but they can’t read, write, spell, do math or solve problems. They are useless to me and I don’t hire them.

  47. BY John says:

    I agree with many of the “Old Timer” traditions and as a fellow of the Mtv generation, I too must say that ol’ Baby Boomer Phil is pretty correct. When it comes to getting a job, you need to play by the rules (and even those have changed quite a bit in the past decade).

    However, the thing that I have seen with most Y’s is that from day one, they have been taught that if they want something, mom and dad will get it for them and they can have it right away. Now you can blame that on the parents for giving their kids what they want when they wanted it and “spoiling” them, but to me, with so many parents in the work world and having 9-5′s, can you expect any different? “Sure, honey. Whatever you want. Just let me rest. I’ve had a long day at work.”

    This is a fundamental reason why you will see more Y’ers learn how to be entrepreneurs or contractors. They want lifestyle (the opposite of what their parents had) and not to work 25-35 years and at the end suddenly be let go and have their 401k’s shot down. We don’t have social security as an option for retirement. Those that think that far ahead know this to be true. If companies aren’t going to show loyalty to them, why should they show loyalty to a company? They can simply make their own! And with the internet and websites like eBay, Amazon, and Facebook, and Twitter as role models, Y’ers are seeing just how much potential is actually out there to start their own brand.

    Heck, for further confirmation of this, take a look at how popular entrepreneurial classes and curriculum are on large campuses. Fortunately for me, I had the opportunity to be a TA for a few classes. It’s amazing how the old Prussian Education System is losing it’s grip. :-)

    But again, I will say that business is business. There are plenty of things that still need to be done traditionally. But even those things are changing at a great speed. Hang on tight, everyone!!! The paradigm has just shifted!

  48. BY John says:

    I agree with many of the “Old Timer” traditions and as a fellow of the Mtv generation, I too must say that ol’ Baby Boomer Phil is pretty correct. When it comes to getting a job, you need to play by the rules (and even those have changed quite a bit in the past decade).

    However, the thing that I have seen with most Y’s is that from day one, they have been taught that if they want something, mom and dad will get it for them and they can have it right away. Now you can blame that on the parents for giving their kids what they want when they wanted it and “spoiling” them, but to me, with so many parents in the work world and having 9-5′s, can you expect any different? “Sure, honey. Whatever you want. Just let me rest. I’ve had a long day at work.”

    This is a fundamental reason why you will see more Y’ers learn how to be entrepreneurs or contractors. They want lifestyle (the opposite of what their parents had) and not to work 25-35 years and at the end suddenly be let go and have their 401k’s shot down. We don’t have social security as an option for retirement. Those that think that far ahead know this to be true. If companies aren’t going to show loyalty to them, why should they show loyalty to a company? They can simply make their own! And with the internet and websites like eBay, Amazon, and Facebook, and Twitter as role models, Y’ers are seeing just how much potential is actually out there to start their own brand.

    Heck, for further confirmation of this, take a look at how popular entrepreneurial classes and curriculum are on large campuses. Fortunately for me, I had the opportunity to be a TA for a few classes. It’s amazing how the old Prussian Education System is losing it’s grip. :-)

    But again, I will say that business is business. There are plenty of things that still need to be done traditionally. But even those things are changing at a great speed. Hang on tight, everyone!!! The paradigm has just shifted!

  49. BY WebDawg says:

    What the heck?

    Why put the generations in categories anyways? What happens when we get to Z? This is Gen X thinking at its best….

    I think you are getting the overall ‘newness’ of the ideas and how fast information is moving and accelerating and pumping that all into Gen Y.

    Gen Y is like you. Except everything is different. I also think that most of you are confusing with the attitude that the new technology is creating in the younger generation. Simplicity and automation and laziness.

    Things like application processes need to change. Who the hell wants to have login information for 30+ job sites? Why should I fill out my resume 100′s of times over and over when the real problem is a standard resume document format.

    You are cursing your own creations. Think a bit more before you speak.

  50. BY WebDawg says:

    What the heck?

    Why put the generations in categories anyways? What happens when we get to Z? This is Gen X thinking at its best….

    I think you are getting the overall ‘newness’ of the ideas and how fast information is moving and accelerating and pumping that all into Gen Y.

    Gen Y is like you. Except everything is different. I also think that most of you are confusing with the attitude that the new technology is creating in the younger generation. Simplicity and automation and laziness.

    Things like application processes need to change. Who the hell wants to have login information for 30+ job sites? Why should I fill out my resume 100′s of times over and over when the real problem is a standard resume document format.

    You are cursing your own creations. Think a bit more before you speak.

  51. BY Keith Rodgers says:

    The generation that thinks the world owes them a living because they after all have spent 3-4yrs obtaining a degree.
    They think the world and jobs will come to them wrong!
    Put yourself in the employers position would you hire a seasoned experienced professional or a young fresh faced graduate? If your a CEO thats looking to cut costs you choose a fresh faced graduate, then you realize how wrong you were with that decision when they mess up!
    Older people may look stale or stuck in there ways, but thats just a perception thing. The reality is they have been round the block and got the T shirt more times and they know what works and what will not.
    Its not rocket science, so instead of being hostile to X generation listen to them and learn! Experience is a lot more valuable than any paper qualification!

  52. BY Keith Rodgers says:

    The generation that thinks the world owes them a living because they after all have spent 3-4yrs obtaining a degree.
    They think the world and jobs will come to them wrong!
    Put yourself in the employers position would you hire a seasoned experienced professional or a young fresh faced graduate? If your a CEO thats looking to cut costs you choose a fresh faced graduate, then you realize how wrong you were with that decision when they mess up!
    Older people may look stale or stuck in there ways, but thats just a perception thing. The reality is they have been round the block and got the T shirt more times and they know what works and what will not.
    Its not rocket science, so instead of being hostile to X generation listen to them and learn! Experience is a lot more valuable than any paper qualification!

  53. BY WebDawg says:

    Some of you are not thinking objective either. You say things like ‘mom and dad will buy them this’. Are you kidding? Are you the only people that are poor?

    Loyal to a company? Do you watch the news? The collapsing economy? How am I suppose to be loyal to a company that’s cooking the books? Maby I should go work for one of those banks that raised the deficit to 1 trillion. Or an auto manufacture that refuses to innovate because they are making ‘good money’ now.

  54. BY WebDawg says:

    Some of you are not thinking objective either. You say things like ‘mom and dad will buy them this’. Are you kidding? Are you the only people that are poor?

    Loyal to a company? Do you watch the news? The collapsing economy? How am I suppose to be loyal to a company that’s cooking the books? Maby I should go work for one of those banks that raised the deficit to 1 trillion. Or an auto manufacture that refuses to innovate because they are making ‘good money’ now.

  55. BY Rik Reed says:

    Between Boomer and X myself. The biggest issue I see with “Y” is they have taken the notion of question everything and disrespect authority to new highs. It started with the 1960′s generation and continues to escalate. You disrespect someone in my IT shop, you’ll find yourself on unemployment, period. So all you gen ‘Y”s out there looking for jobs or trying to hang on in this economy, it’s not ALL about YOU. It’s about providing quality services and products to your clients. Incorporate that into you attitude and character and lose the entitlement mentality. People with the entitlement mentality are revolting to successful business pros and find themselves jumping to and from bad jobs with long gaps of empty space in between them.

  56. BY Rik Reed says:

    Between Boomer and X myself. The biggest issue I see with “Y” is they have taken the notion of question everything and disrespect authority to new highs. It started with the 1960′s generation and continues to escalate. You disrespect someone in my IT shop, you’ll find yourself on unemployment, period. So all you gen ‘Y”s out there looking for jobs or trying to hang on in this economy, it’s not ALL about YOU. It’s about providing quality services and products to your clients. Incorporate that into you attitude and character and lose the entitlement mentality. People with the entitlement mentality are revolting to successful business pros and find themselves jumping to and from bad jobs with long gaps of empty space in between them.

  57. BY Troy Kin says:

    This is yet another example of the people in power blaming the youth for the problems. It is a consistant historical fact…this is just another manifestation of that. If “Gen Y”ers have poor business skills, that is the fault of their education system, upbringing, college education, councilers, etc…the people who’s responsibility it is to prepare children to become adults are the one’s to blame. Children do not just get older and naturally know how to function in the white-collar world. They need help.

    It is the decision makers’ problem when they lose the ability to communicate with their employees/potential employees. They are the stakeholders, and they are lacking in an essential business skill–understanding your employees. The bigger problem is that they do not care to. Decision makers with opinions like this should not be surprised when their companies “can’t find good employees” or “are unsatisfied with the pool of canidates in the 18-24 age group”. This is just classic transferrance. The decision makers haven’t changed and don’t make honest efforts to understand changes in the marketplace for employees and changes in employee needs and wants. Then they wonder what is going on with “these damn kids”.

  58. BY Troy Kin says:

    This is yet another example of the people in power blaming the youth for the problems. It is a consistant historical fact…this is just another manifestation of that. If “Gen Y”ers have poor business skills, that is the fault of their education system, upbringing, college education, councilers, etc…the people who’s responsibility it is to prepare children to become adults are the one’s to blame. Children do not just get older and naturally know how to function in the white-collar world. They need help.

    It is the decision makers’ problem when they lose the ability to communicate with their employees/potential employees. They are the stakeholders, and they are lacking in an essential business skill–understanding your employees. The bigger problem is that they do not care to. Decision makers with opinions like this should not be surprised when their companies “can’t find good employees” or “are unsatisfied with the pool of canidates in the 18-24 age group”. This is just classic transferrance. The decision makers haven’t changed and don’t make honest efforts to understand changes in the marketplace for employees and changes in employee needs and wants. Then they wonder what is going on with “these damn kids”.

  59. BY Celeste Long says:

    I turn 50 this year and certainly don’t feel like I am 50. the only difference is that I’ve had to learn that my expectations about how things “should” be were a stumbling block to my advancement. Railing against the machine in the corporate world never works if you confront it face on. You only get bruised and battered by throwing yourself against the wall and you ruin your credibility.

    Change always comes best when you understand your employers mindset and you position yourself with solutions that provide an easily seen and gut felt understanding of the the benefits of change.

    As an IT manager nothing irritates me more than the following:
    1. I haven’t been trained
    2. I’m waiting on someone to get back to me
    3. Explaining something more than twice to an employee because they don’t bother to write it down

    Being a professional means being able to self educate, take responsibility and be proactive. If you don’t want to do these things, IT is not the right place for you.

    No one owes you anything. You are getting paid to provide services to your company – not the other way around.

  60. BY Celeste Long says:

    I turn 50 this year and certainly don’t feel like I am 50. the only difference is that I’ve had to learn that my expectations about how things “should” be were a stumbling block to my advancement. Railing against the machine in the corporate world never works if you confront it face on. You only get bruised and battered by throwing yourself against the wall and you ruin your credibility.

    Change always comes best when you understand your employers mindset and you position yourself with solutions that provide an easily seen and gut felt understanding of the the benefits of change.

    As an IT manager nothing irritates me more than the following:
    1. I haven’t been trained
    2. I’m waiting on someone to get back to me
    3. Explaining something more than twice to an employee because they don’t bother to write it down

    Being a professional means being able to self educate, take responsibility and be proactive. If you don’t want to do these things, IT is not the right place for you.

    No one owes you anything. You are getting paid to provide services to your company – not the other way around.

  61. BY Celeste Long says:

    Experience has taught me that my expectations about how things “should” be impeded my advancement. Railing against the corporate machine doesn’t work if you confront it face on. You get bruised and battered and ruin your credibility. Change comes when you understand your employers mindset and position yourself with solutions that provide an easily seen and gut felt understanding of the benefits of change. As an IT manager nothing irritates me more than the following: 1. I haven’t been trained 2. I’m waiting on someone to get back to me 3. Explaining something more than twice to an employee because they don’t bother to write it down. A professional self educates, takes responsibility and is proactive. If you don’t want to do this, IT is not for you.

  62. BY Celeste Long says:

    Experience has taught me that my expectations about how things “should” be impeded my advancement. Railing against the corporate machine doesn’t work if you confront it face on. You get bruised and battered and ruin your credibility. Change comes when you understand your employers mindset and position yourself with solutions that provide an easily seen and gut felt understanding of the benefits of change. As an IT manager nothing irritates me more than the following: 1. I haven’t been trained 2. I’m waiting on someone to get back to me 3. Explaining something more than twice to an employee because they don’t bother to write it down. A professional self educates, takes responsibility and is proactive. If you don’t want to do this, IT is not for you.

  63. BY Y Hope says:

    As a Gen Yer working IT for large corporation, these comments hit close to home. Our IT department consists of mostly boomers, a small percentage of Gen Xers (6-10%) and a very small percent of Gen Y (2-4%). This creates an interesting work dynamic that forces you to make friends with people that outside of work you wouldn’t likely socialize with. Even though this is challenging at times, I honestly feel that I have gained most from the Boomers. They are practical, organized and good role models for us young folks. Granted I do sometimes feel some resentment from the Boomers towards Gen Y, some Boomers ignore us at the water cooler or in conversation too often remind us that we are still so young.

  64. BY Y Hope says:

    As a Gen Yer working IT for large corporation, these comments hit close to home. Our IT department consists of mostly boomers, a small percentage of Gen Xers (6-10%) and a very small percent of Gen Y (2-4%). This creates an interesting work dynamic that forces you to make friends with people that outside of work you wouldn’t likely socialize with. Even though this is challenging at times, I honestly feel that I have gained most from the Boomers. They are practical, organized and good role models for us young folks. Granted I do sometimes feel some resentment from the Boomers towards Gen Y, some Boomers ignore us at the water cooler or in conversation too often remind us that we are still so young.

  65. BY Eric says:

    I am a member of generation Y, and I hate myself.

  66. BY Eric says:

    I am a member of generation Y, and I hate myself.

  67. BY KR says:

    Those of you who think you know everything are very annoying to those of us who do.

  68. BY KR says:

    Those of you who think you know everything are very annoying to those of us who do.

  69. BY Dude says:

    I only watched this video to see if Kat was going to take off any more clothes!

  70. BY Dude says:

    I only watched this video to see if Kat was going to take off any more clothes!

  71. BY rbh says:

    Individuals are individuals, no matter what generation they are in. I am an older worker, but my “Gen Y” coworkers over the last few years have been excellent people with which to work. I think that there are wonderful workers of all ages out there.

  72. BY rbh says:

    Individuals are individuals, no matter what generation they are in. I am an older worker, but my “Gen Y” coworkers over the last few years have been excellent people with which to work. I think that there are wonderful workers of all ages out there.

  73. BY Unknown says:

    It’s sad to see how many of these “Older” comments be summed up in one sentence: “Respect your elders”

    It’s ironic considering 30 years ago, Gen X was engaging in far less “respectful” activities, many of which are now celebrated.

    Ah, well. I guess one of the duties of the middle aged and old is to complain about the young, regardless of what they did in their own youths.

  74. BY Unknown says:

    It’s sad to see how many of these “Older” comments be summed up in one sentence: “Respect your elders”

    It’s ironic considering 30 years ago, Gen X was engaging in far less “respectful” activities, many of which are now celebrated.

    Ah, well. I guess one of the duties of the middle aged and old is to complain about the young, regardless of what they did in their own youths.

  75. BY flatline0 says:

    Being stuck right in the middle of Gen-X and Gen-Y, I have to say I really despise the latter term. It implies that the only birth-right people born after Gen-X have is to follow in the footsteps of their “elders?”.. you guys aren’t that old yet either, so where’s the “superior to your generation” attitude coming from. I’d prefer “Generation Zero”, as Greenday put it.. it implies a more realistic perspective that Gen-Y understands, that there is nothing left for this generation. We are 100% of GDP in debt (unheard of) and every other show on TV tells them to expect armagedon in the next few years. So, maybe the “entitlement” attitude is a result of wanting it “now” b/c no clear vision of the future has ever been provided. I hate to point it out, but the last two generations (X-ers and Boomers) have destroyed the properity and reputation that the WWII generation fought and died for. For what?? so we could have free porn on the internet and a divorce rate of 60%… thanks, but no thanks.. I’ll make my own way.. You guys can pay the social and fiscal debt you’ve pushed on Gen-Y yourselves.

  76. BY flatline0 says:

    Being stuck right in the middle of Gen-X and Gen-Y, I have to say I really despise the latter term. It implies that the only birth-right people born after Gen-X have is to follow in the footsteps of their “elders?”.. you guys aren’t that old yet either, so where’s the “superior to your generation” attitude coming from. I’d prefer “Generation Zero”, as Greenday put it.. it implies a more realistic perspective that Gen-Y understands, that there is nothing left for this generation. We are 100% of GDP in debt (unheard of) and every other show on TV tells them to expect armagedon in the next few years. So, maybe the “entitlement” attitude is a result of wanting it “now” b/c no clear vision of the future has ever been provided. I hate to point it out, but the last two generations (X-ers and Boomers) have destroyed the properity and reputation that the WWII generation fought and died for. For what?? so we could have free porn on the internet and a divorce rate of 60%… thanks, but no thanks.. I’ll make my own way.. You guys can pay the social and fiscal debt you’ve pushed on Gen-Y yourselves.

  77. BY whatever says:

    flatline0, I think you’re missing it.

    I’m a “Gen X” (whatever that means), and I can clearly say, if you truly think that “Gen X” was into the same values as you, you’re sorely mistaken.

    Many of my peers were into “getting out of the system” and “trying to do the right thing, even if it meant forgoing money”. It was more about being true to yourself and doing something that didn’t involve working for nasty souless megacorps that seemed (at the time) hellbent on turning the world into a pile of crap in return for profit (as if anything has changed).

    What were we followed by?

    A group of gimme gimme people that were all about the money, no matter who they stepped on in the process. Sycophants that couldn’t do the work they were given but would kiss a$$ from here to eternity if it meant a fat payday.

    It sickens me that Gen X gets a bad rap when there were many, many contributions made from “us”, just as the Boomers before, and many other generations prior. But I have yet to see anything materialize from Gen Y other than “whaa whaa whaa I wanna bigger paycheck but work only 2 hours, whaa”. Grow up. I’m clocking 55-hour work weeks while trying my hardest to make a home for my family and kids, and yes, I’m bucking the trend with a marriage that has lasted past the miserable 7 year average THAT YOUR GENERATION HAS HELPED BRING DOWN. Really, people are getting divorced because they can’t handle their spouse futzing with their iTunes playlist? WTF?

    If you want to get into a pissing match, keep in mind that the only reason Gen X is having to eat their own words and “work for the megacorps” is that, in the end, stability wins out over uncertainty, especially with a family. Doesn’t mean we like it, it just means we work hard to make a living. Next time you’re sucking down Ramen dinner, keep that in mind.

  78. BY whatever says:

    flatline0, I think you’re missing it.

    I’m a “Gen X” (whatever that means), and I can clearly say, if you truly think that “Gen X” was into the same values as you, you’re sorely mistaken.

    Many of my peers were into “getting out of the system” and “trying to do the right thing, even if it meant forgoing money”. It was more about being true to yourself and doing something that didn’t involve working for nasty souless megacorps that seemed (at the time) hellbent on turning the world into a pile of crap in return for profit (as if anything has changed).

    What were we followed by?

    A group of gimme gimme people that were all about the money, no matter who they stepped on in the process. Sycophants that couldn’t do the work they were given but would kiss a$$ from here to eternity if it meant a fat payday.

    It sickens me that Gen X gets a bad rap when there were many, many contributions made from “us”, just as the Boomers before, and many other generations prior. But I have yet to see anything materialize from Gen Y other than “whaa whaa whaa I wanna bigger paycheck but work only 2 hours, whaa”. Grow up. I’m clocking 55-hour work weeks while trying my hardest to make a home for my family and kids, and yes, I’m bucking the trend with a marriage that has lasted past the miserable 7 year average THAT YOUR GENERATION HAS HELPED BRING DOWN. Really, people are getting divorced because they can’t handle their spouse futzing with their iTunes playlist? WTF?

    If you want to get into a pissing match, keep in mind that the only reason Gen X is having to eat their own words and “work for the megacorps” is that, in the end, stability wins out over uncertainty, especially with a family. Doesn’t mean we like it, it just means we work hard to make a living. Next time you’re sucking down Ramen dinner, keep that in mind.

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