Let’s Say it Again: Don’t Let Facebook Sabotage Your Career

At this stage of the game, it’s surprising that some people still need to be told that oversharing on a social network can hurt their job hunt. CIO.com reviews the dos and don’ts of social networking for professionals, noting straight away that 45 percent of hiring managers use social networking sites to screen job seekers, and that number has doubled in the past year.

Another shocking stat: 35 percent of hiring managers have immediately screened out candidates based on what they found on candidates’ social networking profiles.CIO.com’s top seven hints for using social networking to your advantage rather than to your detriment:

    1. Make sure your social networking profiles are complete and rich with search-engine friendly keywords
    2. Use your profile communicate your career status
    3. Post recommendations from current and former managers, staff, clients, and colleagues
    4. Personalize the URLs for your social networking sites. Facebook lets users create URLs for their profile pages that include their names
    5. Join online groups in your area of expertise
    6. Be courteous. When someone wants to connect with or "follow" you, reciprocate.
    7. Use proper grammar and correct spelling in your profiles.

And, it bears repeating, leave out anything that hints at strongly held political positions or that reveals the fact that you really know how to party. Potential employers do not need to see photos of your lost weekend on a Lake Havasu houseboat with eight of your drinking buddies.

–Don Willmott

Comments

  1. BY Kelly says:

    I guess I can see where employers would want to check out social sites like facebook and MySpace in considering candidates, but I really don’t agree with it. My facebook page is for me and my friends and family, and what I post there is not for my boss or my potential boss to see. What I do on a wild and crazy vacation, or if I send my boyfriend a sexy app request and post it for him to see, is my business, not theirs. That being said, I am aware that employers are really starting to Google candidates and check out social sites, so I have my facebook page set to completely private, and I use a different name there. I would urge anyone actively searching for a job to use a professional networking site like LinkedIn with their real name, and use an adapted name or nickname for their social sites for maximum privacy.

  2. BY Kelly says:

    I guess I can see where employers would want to check out social sites like facebook and MySpace in considering candidates, but I really don’t agree with it. My facebook page is for me and my friends and family, and what I post there is not for my boss or my potential boss to see. What I do on a wild and crazy vacation, or if I send my boyfriend a sexy app request and post it for him to see, is my business, not theirs. That being said, I am aware that employers are really starting to Google candidates and check out social sites, so I have my facebook page set to completely private, and I use a different name there. I would urge anyone actively searching for a job to use a professional networking site like LinkedIn with their real name, and use an adapted name or nickname for their social sites for maximum privacy.

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