Three Questions for Polly Pearson, VP at EMC

You know the story: Technologists have to work hard to keep their skills relevant and tech companies have to build strong brands to entice the best talent.

Polly Pearson, vice president of employment brand and strategy engagement at EMC, understands that all too well. She has worked closely with executives there to help build the company’s employment brand, and writes extensively on her blog about what you can do to build your own reputation, stay relevant, and make yourself more attractive to employers. Staff writer Sonia Lelii sat down with Polly to ask her a few key questions:

How can IT people build their brand?

What can set you apart during a job interview?

How important are soft skills?

– Sonia R. Lelii

 

Comments

  1. BY Sal Cannella says:

    Hi guys, I found your questions and answers interview with Polly very informative and a good motivator for starting your job search. I¿m a recently laid off IT worker and having a hard time getting started with my job search. This interview reminded me that I have most of the qualities mentioned in Polly¿s answers; now I know the first think I need to do for my job search is to register on LinkedIn.

    Thank you,
    Sal

  2. BY Sal Cannella says:

    Hi guys, I found your questions and answers interview with Polly very informative and a good motivator for starting your job search. I¿m a recently laid off IT worker and having a hard time getting started with my job search. This interview reminded me that I have most of the qualities mentioned in Polly¿s answers; now I know the first think I need to do for my job search is to register on LinkedIn.

    Thank you,
    Sal

  3. BY Jeff M says:

    I have good communications skills, a teaching degree and experiance to go along with my IT degree. I worked for years on these skills so what did it get me? I was the one who got to travel and train in the people who replaced me and my fellow IT people when the company decided to give huge bonuses to managers and cut our jobs. Really? I need Twitter and Facebook to get a job? What a joke that was! The only people you get when you look for those skills are people who spend too much time at work posting about everything they want to be doing but not actually doing anything when they should be working.

  4. BY Jeff M says:

    I have good communications skills, a teaching degree and experiance to go along with my IT degree. I worked for years on these skills so what did it get me? I was the one who got to travel and train in the people who replaced me and my fellow IT people when the company decided to give huge bonuses to managers and cut our jobs. Really? I need Twitter and Facebook to get a job? What a joke that was! The only people you get when you look for those skills are people who spend too much time at work posting about everything they want to be doing but not actually doing anything when they should be working.

  5. BY Neil W. says:

    I’m still waiting for a recruiter to tell me that they found me on LinkedIn. LinkedIn=0%, Other Job Sites=100%. I most certainly don’t want the same people following my on my Facebook either. Facebook=Social, LinkedIn=Professional. If any hiring person saw our Facebook pages, we would all be out of work! I certainly don’t need Twitter either. What a bunch of baloney!

  6. BY Neil W. says:

    I’m still waiting for a recruiter to tell me that they found me on LinkedIn. LinkedIn=0%, Other Job Sites=100%. I most certainly don’t want the same people following my on my Facebook either. Facebook=Social, LinkedIn=Professional. If any hiring person saw our Facebook pages, we would all be out of work! I certainly don’t need Twitter either. What a bunch of baloney!

  7. BY Annonymous says:

    Agreed. EMC is arrogant. But I find employers now are all about the money. They’ll hire a french fry technician from McDonald’s as a Network Engineer if they are willing to work for peanuts. Companies now don’t care about what you can bring to the table. It’s all about how cheap you’re willing to be.

  8. BY Annonymous says:

    Agreed. EMC is arrogant. But I find employers now are all about the money. They’ll hire a french fry technician from McDonald’s as a Network Engineer if they are willing to work for peanuts. Companies now don’t care about what you can bring to the table. It’s all about how cheap you’re willing to be.

  9. BY KG says:

    Of the few interviews I’ve been invited to–NEVER has the employer asked me about my “online” presence. And if one does, I will tell her/him that as a two-time victim of identity theft, I am careful about my privacy and prefer to spend my time reading books. Many people who have been fired use social media tools to post recommendations to offset their firing. If this is “branding,” we are all in trouble, especially if employers get lazy and only read that online fiction rather than actually speaking to our job references. Remember the old saying: “don’t believe everything you read.”? I agree with the person who wrote about EMC’s arrogance/reputation, and I feel she is just saying what everyone else is saying who has jumped on the Web 2.0 social media bandwagon!

  10. BY KG says:

    Of the few interviews I’ve been invited to–NEVER has the employer asked me about my “online” presence. And if one does, I will tell her/him that as a two-time victim of identity theft, I am careful about my privacy and prefer to spend my time reading books. Many people who have been fired use social media tools to post recommendations to offset their firing. If this is “branding,” we are all in trouble, especially if employers get lazy and only read that online fiction rather than actually speaking to our job references. Remember the old saying: “don’t believe everything you read.”? I agree with the person who wrote about EMC’s arrogance/reputation, and I feel she is just saying what everyone else is saying who has jumped on the Web 2.0 social media bandwagon!

  11. BY Ronald B says:

    I’ve been job searching for 10 months after a career in IT. I don’t like hearing that I need to “market” myself, need my own blog or even .com. BUT… This is not the first time I’ve heard it. I got counselling from my former employer, from the state Employment Office and from a hired headhunter (That was a bad thing I did), and they all urge the same thing. I don’t like it, but, if I want a good job and want it sooner rather than later….then I have to follow the rules as much as I can.
    No, we don’t need to use Twitter to get a job, but if we expect to fit in the culture of the modern IT department, being a Twitter user is an indicator that we’ll fit in.
    If we want a job, listen to the advise, try to follow as much of it as we can. Its just the way it is today. Yes, we really are just a hired piece of meat and we’ll be thrown away as soon as we go rancid. Work with what you have now and follow the rules, one of which is to stop whinning and show that you want a job. Listen to people smarter than us – on this subject at least.

  12. BY Ronald B says:

    I’ve been job searching for 10 months after a career in IT. I don’t like hearing that I need to “market” myself, need my own blog or even .com. BUT… This is not the first time I’ve heard it. I got counselling from my former employer, from the state Employment Office and from a hired headhunter (That was a bad thing I did), and they all urge the same thing. I don’t like it, but, if I want a good job and want it sooner rather than later….then I have to follow the rules as much as I can.
    No, we don’t need to use Twitter to get a job, but if we expect to fit in the culture of the modern IT department, being a Twitter user is an indicator that we’ll fit in.
    If we want a job, listen to the advise, try to follow as much of it as we can. Its just the way it is today. Yes, we really are just a hired piece of meat and we’ll be thrown away as soon as we go rancid. Work with what you have now and follow the rules, one of which is to stop whinning and show that you want a job. Listen to people smarter than us – on this subject at least.

  13. BY xenorm says:

    So, Javelineer and Jeff M, you’re saying that it’d be best to forgo IT and become a manager? I’m in, thanks for the advice.

  14. BY xenorm says:

    So, Javelineer and Jeff M, you’re saying that it’d be best to forgo IT and become a manager? I’m in, thanks for the advice.

  15. BY Mike says:

    Oh please. Twitter and Facebook are generally filled with inane comments about haircuts, how many Mafioso you wacked in Mafia wars, or other such useless-to-your-job-search miscellany. ‘Sides, I’ve oft been told that most jobs are landed because you personally know the person who knows about the job. How does that square with some of Polly’s advice?

  16. BY Mike says:

    Oh please. Twitter and Facebook are generally filled with inane comments about haircuts, how many Mafioso you wacked in Mafia wars, or other such useless-to-your-job-search miscellany. ‘Sides, I’ve oft been told that most jobs are landed because you personally know the person who knows about the job. How does that square with some of Polly’s advice?

  17. BY Jim Horrell says:

    The advice given in these short videos is applicable not to just people seeking I.T. people, but all job seekers. I am going to post the link to this page to people in my networking groups.

    Jim Horrell

  18. BY Jim Horrell says:

    The advice given in these short videos is applicable not to just people seeking I.T. people, but all job seekers. I am going to post the link to this page to people in my networking groups.

    Jim Horrell

  19. BY anonymous says:

    Good comments from Sonia, but I find them in conflict with the “real” EMC. Having worked around EMC for over ten years, I can tell you they are one of the most arrogant companies in the industry. Arrogant about their technology, their service and their solutions which are all just average. The EMC pre-employment process focuses more on past personal income than skills and qualities of the candidate.

    Again, Sonia is “saying” the right things, but EMC has been saying the right things for a long time with little or no follow thru.

  20. BY anonymous says:

    Good comments from Sonia, but I find them in conflict with the “real” EMC. Having worked around EMC for over ten years, I can tell you they are one of the most arrogant companies in the industry. Arrogant about their technology, their service and their solutions which are all just average. The EMC pre-employment process focuses more on past personal income than skills and qualities of the candidate.

    Again, Sonia is “saying” the right things, but EMC has been saying the right things for a long time with little or no follow thru.

  21. BY tommyorlando says:

    The world is full of crackpot genuises spouting drivel like this woman. Have you noticed it’s 99% females in these positions? Human Resorces hacks abound – and they just serve as parrots – employers are scared of being sued by this one and that one. People have been “comminicating” since the beginning of time. We don’t need another polyester Polly proving what a hack she is. It’s embarrassing.

  22. BY tommyorlando says:

    The world is full of crackpot genuises spouting drivel like this woman. Have you noticed it’s 99% females in these positions? Human Resorces hacks abound – and they just serve as parrots – employers are scared of being sued by this one and that one. People have been “comminicating” since the beginning of time. We don’t need another polyester Polly proving what a hack she is. It’s embarrassing.

  23. BY The Javelineer says:

    Great. Technical workers must be articulate, have the charisma and writing skills to maintain an online “following,” adapt constantly to brand new technologies – in addition to getting a difficult technical education, difficult technical qualifications, and difficult hands-on training to be proficient.

    Wait a minute. Managers don’t have to do any of that stuff. They get ridiculously easy “business educations” that barely include mathematics, have extremely poor reasoning skills, emphasize wordsmithing rather than workmanship, and generally toss off productive employees solely on the basis of cost. This is rank hypocrisy.

    If a tech worker does the things Ms. Pearson suggests, why would they work for EMC instead of competing with it? If I can create my own brand, I don’t need EMC. If I am articulate and can create an online following, I don’t need EMC. I can compete with EMC.

    Ms. Pearson wants employees to act like entrepreneurs and also act like obedient employees. It’s the same old “something for nothing” game.” The company gets your online following with all its marketing potential. You just get a job. That’s a bad deal.

    American managers are unreasonable and unrealistic.

  24. BY The Javelineer says:

    Great. Technical workers must be articulate, have the charisma and writing skills to maintain an online “following,” adapt constantly to brand new technologies – in addition to getting a difficult technical education, difficult technical qualifications, and difficult hands-on training to be proficient.

    Wait a minute. Managers don’t have to do any of that stuff. They get ridiculously easy “business educations” that barely include mathematics, have extremely poor reasoning skills, emphasize wordsmithing rather than workmanship, and generally toss off productive employees solely on the basis of cost. This is rank hypocrisy.

    If a tech worker does the things Ms. Pearson suggests, why would they work for EMC instead of competing with it? If I can create my own brand, I don’t need EMC. If I am articulate and can create an online following, I don’t need EMC. I can compete with EMC.

    Ms. Pearson wants employees to act like entrepreneurs and also act like obedient employees. It’s the same old “something for nothing” game.” The company gets your online following with all its marketing potential. You just get a job. That’s a bad deal.

    American managers are unreasonable and unrealistic.

  25. BY The Javelineer says:

    Techies must acquire a difficult technical education, difficult technical qualifications, difficult hands-on training ¿ and then acquire advanced writing and communication skills to maintain an online “following,”

    Uh huh. If I can create my own brand, I don’t need EMC. If I can create an online following, then I can sell. I don’t need EMC.

    Ms. Pearson wants employees to act like entrepreneurs and also obedient employees. It’s the same old “something for nothing” game.” American managers are unreasonable and unrealistic.

  26. BY The Javelineer says:

    Techies must acquire a difficult technical education, difficult technical qualifications, difficult hands-on training ¿ and then acquire advanced writing and communication skills to maintain an online “following,”

    Uh huh. If I can create my own brand, I don’t need EMC. If I can create an online following, then I can sell. I don’t need EMC.

    Ms. Pearson wants employees to act like entrepreneurs and also obedient employees. It’s the same old “something for nothing” game.” American managers are unreasonable and unrealistic.

  27. BY Fred Bosick says:

    Personal Branding?

    “Hi, I’m Cheerios, nice to meet you Maxwell House!”

    An excellent reason to have good communication and collaboration skills is that it’s easier for you to train your replacements that are in Russia, India, and China.. The rest of the soft skills allow you to articulate your dissatisfaction at being discarded rather than succumbing to an inchoate rage and getting violent.

    I do not use Twitter or FaceBook. I don’t need to let people know if I’m in the can or to post drunken karaoke pics.

    You entice talent by giving them real problems to solve rather than satisfying incompetent brand manager checklists, and by *paying* them. Whoda thunkit?

    Does anyone think those Indian would-be engineers are promoting their own personal brand and Twittering? Of course not! Tata Consulting and Infosys are the only brands they need, and that you cannot compete with.

  28. BY Fred Bosick says:

    Personal Branding?

    “Hi, I’m Cheerios, nice to meet you Maxwell House!”

    An excellent reason to have good communication and collaboration skills is that it’s easier for you to train your replacements that are in Russia, India, and China.. The rest of the soft skills allow you to articulate your dissatisfaction at being discarded rather than succumbing to an inchoate rage and getting violent.

    I do not use Twitter or FaceBook. I don’t need to let people know if I’m in the can or to post drunken karaoke pics.

    You entice talent by giving them real problems to solve rather than satisfying incompetent brand manager checklists, and by *paying* them. Whoda thunkit?

    Does anyone think those Indian would-be engineers are promoting their own personal brand and Twittering? Of course not! Tata Consulting and Infosys are the only brands they need, and that you cannot compete with.

  29. BY Fred Bosick says:

    An excellent reason to have good communication and collaboration skills is that it’s easier for you to train your replacements that are in Russia, India, and China.. The rest of the soft skills allow you to articulate your dissatisfaction at being discarded rather than succumbing to an inchoate rage and getting violent.

    You entice talent by giving them real problems to solve rather than satisfying incompetent brand manager checklists, and by *paying* them. Whoda thunkit?

    Does anyone think those Indian would-be engineers are promoting their own personal brand and Twittering? Of course not! H-1B is the only brand they need, and that you cannot compete with.

  30. BY Fred Bosick says:

    An excellent reason to have good communication and collaboration skills is that it’s easier for you to train your replacements that are in Russia, India, and China.. The rest of the soft skills allow you to articulate your dissatisfaction at being discarded rather than succumbing to an inchoate rage and getting violent.

    You entice talent by giving them real problems to solve rather than satisfying incompetent brand manager checklists, and by *paying* them. Whoda thunkit?

    Does anyone think those Indian would-be engineers are promoting their own personal brand and Twittering? Of course not! H-1B is the only brand they need, and that you cannot compete with.

  31. BY Don says:

    It is hysterical the way that it has become a meat market. But I can see that the pendulum will swing. Example: The ‘recruiting’ company that got me a job makes like 45% of what I do, the rate I make – my share – is smack in the middle of the ‘going rate’ for SAP. I am a good performer, and there has been nothing I can not do or figure out how to do in a reasonable amount of time. Let’s say at least average and if you ask me ‘above average.’ I am a “resource”. But, due to budget at the client site, they want to save $15 – 30 dollars per hour and by terminating my contract with the recruiter where my hours support 4 other layers (salesman,sales mgr, branch mgr, corporate) and buying ‘locally’ the client can arguably get the same talent for 25% less and the techie gets the same pay… It will be Meatmarket Inc that is replaced by a ‘low-cost provider’, by someone who gets a more honest and well-deserved say 18-28% at most. My strategy is to find a few recruiters who are local, who understands what I do, who are not trying to put their kids thru college on my work alone and really work on BOTH our behalfs. They can offer the client a per hour price that is ‘above perm employee’ but not so near the $100 per hour mark while still paying tech the going rate. The client then does not need to grab the 1st resource available and then kick em to the curb when a cheaper person comes along. I say: if techies stick to their rate, the bloodsuckers will disappear.

  32. BY Don says:

    It is hysterical the way that it has become a meat market. But I can see that the pendulum will swing. Example: The ‘recruiting’ company that got me a job makes like 45% of what I do, the rate I make – my share – is smack in the middle of the ‘going rate’ for SAP. I am a good performer, and there has been nothing I can not do or figure out how to do in a reasonable amount of time. Let’s say at least average and if you ask me ‘above average.’ I am a “resource”. But, due to budget at the client site, they want to save $15 – 30 dollars per hour and by terminating my contract with the recruiter where my hours support 4 other layers (salesman,sales mgr, branch mgr, corporate) and buying ‘locally’ the client can arguably get the same talent for 25% less and the techie gets the same pay… It will be Meatmarket Inc that is replaced by a ‘low-cost provider’, by someone who gets a more honest and well-deserved say 18-28% at most. My strategy is to find a few recruiters who are local, who understands what I do, who are not trying to put their kids thru college on my work alone and really work on BOTH our behalfs. They can offer the client a per hour price that is ‘above perm employee’ but not so near the $100 per hour mark while still paying tech the going rate. The client then does not need to grab the 1st resource available and then kick em to the curb when a cheaper person comes along. I say: if techies stick to their rate, the bloodsuckers will disappear.

  33. BY Enigmatist says:

    From reading this blog so far, its become abundantly clear that this advice is a crock. I agree 100% with most of the posters here. Our jobs are being shipped off and the survivors in the job market are not the skilled labor, but the brown-nosers that have the ‘soft skills’, but no real talent or hard skills. Its become abundantly clear why quality of products and services of American companies are on the decline. Now unemployed and highly skilled Americans have to brand themselves? Top management are just a bunch of unrealistic, unskilled, bean counters. No disrespect to accountants here. I’m talking about the, ‘pay less and expect more out of your employees or we ship your jobs over seas’ mentality. What top management is not factoring in is that what they’re doing hurts the domestic economy and ultimately their bottom line of their companies. Keep smacking the hand that feeds you. You can see where that’s gotten us. All of you clueless at the top managers, get your act together before you cause even more damage to the domestic economy. This economy will not turn around until skilled Americans are employed again instead of sitting at home trying to brand themselves on the internet. Do your part in lowering unemployment instead of coming up with ridiculous criteria for hiring people. I know I speak for a lot of Americans.

  34. BY Enigmatist says:

    From reading this blog so far, its become abundantly clear that this advice is a crock. I agree 100% with most of the posters here. Our jobs are being shipped off and the survivors in the job market are not the skilled labor, but the brown-nosers that have the ‘soft skills’, but no real talent or hard skills. Its become abundantly clear why quality of products and services of American companies are on the decline. Now unemployed and highly skilled Americans have to brand themselves? Top management are just a bunch of unrealistic, unskilled, bean counters. No disrespect to accountants here. I’m talking about the, ‘pay less and expect more out of your employees or we ship your jobs over seas’ mentality. What top management is not factoring in is that what they’re doing hurts the domestic economy and ultimately their bottom line of their companies. Keep smacking the hand that feeds you. You can see where that’s gotten us. All of you clueless at the top managers, get your act together before you cause even more damage to the domestic economy. This economy will not turn around until skilled Americans are employed again instead of sitting at home trying to brand themselves on the internet. Do your part in lowering unemployment instead of coming up with ridiculous criteria for hiring people. I know I speak for a lot of Americans.

  35. BY George P. Williams says:

    continued. Top management are just a bunch of unrealistic, unskilled, accountants. I’m talking about the, ‘pay less and expect more out of your employees or we ship your jobs over seas’ mentality. What top management is not factoring in is that what they’re doing hurts the domestic economy and ultimately their bottom line of their companies. All of you top managers, get your act together before you cause even more damage to the domestic economy. This economy will not turn around until skilled Americans are employed again instead of sitting at home trying to brand themselves on the internet. Do your part in lowering unemployment instead of coming up with even more criteria for hiring people. I know I speak for a lot of Americans.

  36. BY George P. Williams says:

    continued. Top management are just a bunch of unrealistic, unskilled, accountants. I’m talking about the, ‘pay less and expect more out of your employees or we ship your jobs over seas’ mentality. What top management is not factoring in is that what they’re doing hurts the domestic economy and ultimately their bottom line of their companies. All of you top managers, get your act together before you cause even more damage to the domestic economy. This economy will not turn around until skilled Americans are employed again instead of sitting at home trying to brand themselves on the internet. Do your part in lowering unemployment instead of coming up with even more criteria for hiring people. I know I speak for a lot of Americans.

  37. BY Anonymous says:

    The earlier comment about EMC is completely true. The absolute fraud that EMC performs is why they have been sued repeatedly for various criminal acts. If you don’t fit in with them then they (I’ve seen this repeatedly) do whatever it takes to get rid of you. An example.. they say when you’re hired that you are “given” the right to take up to two weeks of training; however if you do that on company time then you are punished with lower performance numbers. That translates into being fired. And when that happens they will NOT give any recommendations as a matter of policy. I was a key employee and even with 8 letters of commendation from customers they still plotted to get me out of there. To make matters worse they cover their tracks by bribing the leaving employee to sign away their rights !!
    Never never never ever even interview with them. It’s the worse company I’ve worked for in over 20 years of IT. They manage to mangle ITIL into a sweat shop. Creativity is not just frowned on; it’s stomped to death and you’re labeled a problem. Do not even challenge anything especially in a team meeting. The crud of the crop rise to the top. Meanwhile HR happily divulges confidential employee information to others. The newest thing is that you have to write up your own evaluation and it stays with you until you leave the company !!

  38. BY Anonymous says:

    The earlier comment about EMC is completely true. The absolute fraud that EMC performs is why they have been sued repeatedly for various criminal acts. If you don’t fit in with them then they (I’ve seen this repeatedly) do whatever it takes to get rid of you. An example.. they say when you’re hired that you are “given” the right to take up to two weeks of training; however if you do that on company time then you are punished with lower performance numbers. That translates into being fired. And when that happens they will NOT give any recommendations as a matter of policy. I was a key employee and even with 8 letters of commendation from customers they still plotted to get me out of there. To make matters worse they cover their tracks by bribing the leaving employee to sign away their rights !!
    Never never never ever even interview with them. It’s the worse company I’ve worked for in over 20 years of IT. They manage to mangle ITIL into a sweat shop. Creativity is not just frowned on; it’s stomped to death and you’re labeled a problem. Do not even challenge anything especially in a team meeting. The crud of the crop rise to the top. Meanwhile HR happily divulges confidential employee information to others. The newest thing is that you have to write up your own evaluation and it stays with you until you leave the company !!

  39. BY Dave says:

    Hi. I totally disagree with the concept of marketing oneself on blogs and social media for the purpose of enhancing employment possibilities for 2 reasons. First, when a person applies for a position, it’s their skill, time dedicated to the job and their experience that they offer. Not social media baggage. Second, a person should not have to plaster themselves all over the internet without a shred of privacy for the purpose of enhancing their employment possibilities. It is possible to be ‘sociable’ elsewhere.

  40. BY Dave says:

    Hi. I totally disagree with the concept of marketing oneself on blogs and social media for the purpose of enhancing employment possibilities for 2 reasons. First, when a person applies for a position, it’s their skill, time dedicated to the job and their experience that they offer. Not social media baggage. Second, a person should not have to plaster themselves all over the internet without a shred of privacy for the purpose of enhancing their employment possibilities. It is possible to be ‘sociable’ elsewhere.

  41. BY Scott says:

    Boy, some of the comments are right on. I might add that for my type of work, and many others I’m sure, if an HR or placement company finds me on Twitter or Myspace, or what ever, (Linked In is good) I’m not really sure I would want to work for that company anyway. To me, that’s like going down to the corner and looking for day workers as a source for a high tech job. No offense to a legal day worker, but I want a company that finds me on a site where I’m among others, with high quality skills and not for my skills on using Twitter Le Dee and Myface or what ever they are. With so many good people out of work, I would think a company would be looking at sites where true professionals would post information like Linked In, Monster, and Dice. Sure if you want to find “insiders” at those places to get a foot in the door, why not, if they were posting like that they probably have a big mouth and want to feel important and blab, etc. Think about it, how many times have you heard of someone getting fired because of their blogs and such… Use it to your advantage, that’s a “high tech” way to find out information and solve problems, right? Dave, you and others have a good point also, you don’t need to sacrifice your privacy for a job, it’s bad enough that it gets compromised as it is… Probably by those people using Twitter and Myface, etc. Well, I’m getting dizzy, I need to get down from the soapbox now. :-)

  42. BY Scott says:

    Boy, some of the comments are right on. I might add that for my type of work, and many others I’m sure, if an HR or placement company finds me on Twitter or Myspace, or what ever, (Linked In is good) I’m not really sure I would want to work for that company anyway. To me, that’s like going down to the corner and looking for day workers as a source for a high tech job. No offense to a legal day worker, but I want a company that finds me on a site where I’m among others, with high quality skills and not for my skills on using Twitter Le Dee and Myface or what ever they are. With so many good people out of work, I would think a company would be looking at sites where true professionals would post information like Linked In, Monster, and Dice. Sure if you want to find “insiders” at those places to get a foot in the door, why not, if they were posting like that they probably have a big mouth and want to feel important and blab, etc. Think about it, how many times have you heard of someone getting fired because of their blogs and such… Use it to your advantage, that’s a “high tech” way to find out information and solve problems, right? Dave, you and others have a good point also, you don’t need to sacrifice your privacy for a job, it’s bad enough that it gets compromised as it is… Probably by those people using Twitter and Myface, etc. Well, I’m getting dizzy, I need to get down from the soapbox now. :-)

  43. BY Scott says:

    I might add that for my type of work, and others I’m sure, if HR or a placement company finds me on Twitter or Myspace, etc., I’m not sure I want to work for them. That’s like using day workers as a source for high tech jobs. No offense intended, I want a company to find me on a site where I’m among others, with high quality skills and not for my skills on Twitter Le Dee and Myface, etc. With so many good people out of work, I would think company’s would look at sites where true professionals post, like Linked In and Dice. If you want to find “insiders” at Twitter, etc., to get a foot in the door, why not, if they’re posting there, they probably want to feel important or blab, etc. How many times have you heard someone getting fired because of blogs… Use it to your advantage, that’s the way pros solve problems, right? Like Dave said, you don’t need to sacrifice your privacy for a job, it gets compromised as it is… Probably by those people using Twitter and Myface, etc.

  44. BY Scott says:

    I might add that for my type of work, and others I’m sure, if HR or a placement company finds me on Twitter or Myspace, etc., I’m not sure I want to work for them. That’s like using day workers as a source for high tech jobs. No offense intended, I want a company to find me on a site where I’m among others, with high quality skills and not for my skills on Twitter Le Dee and Myface, etc. With so many good people out of work, I would think company’s would look at sites where true professionals post, like Linked In and Dice. If you want to find “insiders” at Twitter, etc., to get a foot in the door, why not, if they’re posting there, they probably want to feel important or blab, etc. How many times have you heard someone getting fired because of blogs… Use it to your advantage, that’s the way pros solve problems, right? Like Dave said, you don’t need to sacrifice your privacy for a job, it gets compromised as it is… Probably by those people using Twitter and Myface, etc.

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